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Full text of "Big Sky Value : Montana tourism & recreation strategic plan 2003-2007"

s 

338.4791 

C18BSV 

2002 




STATE DOCUMENTS COLLECTION 

; ?. r '^ 2006 



IdONTANA STATE LIBRARY 
1515 E. 6th AVE. 



t$ig Sky Value*** 

Montana Tourism & Recreaffc>n"Sifktegic Plan 

2003 - 2007 



y co 

PRIiPARED BY 

THE HINGSTON ROACH GROUP, INC. 

IN ASSOOATION WITH 

PREMIER PLANNING & AMY HAYS 

SEFIEMBER 2002 




SPONSORRD BY 

MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PROMOTION DIVISION 
MONTANA TOURISM & RECREATION INITIATIVE (MTRI) 






iW-flf 

3 0864 1003 5275"9 



Montana's Public Land Base 




Cnj National Forest *)^ State Parks 

^■| Wilderness 

^^B National Parks 

I 1 BLM 



Private Land (61%) 
Montana is 39% public land 



Table of Contents 



Executive Summary ES-1 

Chapter 1: Introduction 1 

Project Context & Purpose 1 

Planning Process 2 

Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 5 

Statewide Socio-Economic Trends 5 

Tourism Trends 8 

Tourism & Recreation Assets and Opportunities 18 

Tourism & Recreation Challenges and Threats 26 

Chapter 3: Markets 35 

Potential Markets: National Tourism Trends 36 

Resident Visitors: Travel Habits of Montanans 46 

Nonresident Visitors: Current Traveler Profile 49 

Montana's Compefitive Niche 64 

Top Priority Target Markets 67 

Chapter 4: Strategy 71 

Strategic Vision 72 

Guiding Principles 73 

Market-Driven Approach 74 

Strategic Goals 75 

Strategic Framework 76 

Organization & Roles T7 



Chapter 5: Priority Objectives & Actions 81 

Managing Information 82 

Managing (Use of) Assets 99 

Creating Teams 116 

Chapter 6: Implementation 129 

Implementation Process & Steps 130 

Organization, Roles & Resources 132 

Priority Projects & Action Table 133 

Appendices 137 

A. Acronyms 139 

B. Montana Code Aimotated 141 

C. Resources 

D. Reference Materials 



Figures 

Fig. 1.1 
Fig. 1.2; 
Fig. 2.1 
Fig. 2.2 
Fig. 2.3: 
Fig. 2.4: 
Fig. 2.5 
Fig. 2.6: 
Fig. 2.7: 



Info-Gathering Process 1 

Information Flow for Tourism Strategy 2 

Fuil-Time & Part-Time Employment, 2000 6 

Personal Income & Earnings by Industry, 2000 6 

Montana Industry Sector Trends 1990-1999 7 

Nonresident Visitors 1990-2000 8 

Lodging Sales Trends 8 

Average Room Rate, 1991-2001 9 

Hotel Occupancy, 2001 9 



Figures (conf d) 

Fig. 2A Lodging Tax CoUections by Quarter - Statewide 9 

Fig. 2.9: Lodging Tax Collections by Region „ 10 

Fig. 2.10: Quarterly Lodging Trends by Region 11 

Fig. 2.11: VisiUtian/Traffic Trends at Key Destinations/Gateways 12 

Fig. 2.12: Visitation at Major Destinations, 1999 13 

Fig. 2.13: State/Natioruil Park Vtsitabon Comparison « 14 

Fig. 2.14: Stale Park Visitors 1992-2000 14 

Fig. 2.15: State Park k Fishing Access Site Visitation „ 14 

Fig. 2.16: Montana Ski Area Trends 15 

Fig. 2.17: Big Game Resident License Sales Trends 16 

Fig. 2.18: Resident k Nonresident Hunting Licenses Sold 16 

Fig. 2.19: Nonresident Big Game k Deer Combo Licenses «.... 16 

Fig. UO: Resident vs. Nonresident Fishing Licenses. 17 

Rg. 2.21: Land Ownership in Montana 18 

Fig. 2.22: Land Ownership Map 18 

Fig. 2.23: Key Heritage k Cultural Assets 19 

Fig. 2.24: Accommodations by Region 20 

Fig. 275: Montana Transportation Gateways 21 

Fig. 2.26: Rest Areas k Highway Improvements 23 

Fig. 227: Airline Routes To/From Montana 23 

Fig. 2.28: Amtrak Ridership in Montana 1992-2000 24 

Fig. 2J9: Montana Lodging Tax Uses 25 

Fig. 2J0: Hot Spots Map 29 

Fig. 231: Motorized Recreation Trends in Montana 29 

Fig. 3.1: Montanans' Activity on Most Recent Leisure Trip by Season 46 

Fig. 3.2: Leisure Trip Activities of MonUnans by Trip Type 47 

Fig. 33: Accommodatians Used for Montanans' Overrught Trips 48 

Fig. 3.4: Top Priority Target Markets Map 68 

Fig. 33: Montana's 2000-2001 Nonresident Tourist Markets Map 69 

Fig. 4.1: Market-Driven Approach. 74 

Fig. 42: Stale Level Team 77 

Fig. 4 J: Regional Level Team 77 

Fig. 4.4: Statewide Tourism Management Network 78 

Fig. 4A Statewide Tourism Management Network Benefita 79 

Fig. 5.1: Rest Areas k Highway Improvements 104 

Fig. 5.2: State-Funded Gateway VICs 109 

Fig. 53: Symbol Signs 112 

Fig. 6.1: Existing System of Tourism k Recreation Communication 130 

Fig. 6.2: Refined System of Tourism k Recreation Communication 131 



Tables 

Table 1.1 
Table 2.1 
Table 2.2: 
Table 23: 
Table 2.4 
Table 23: 
Table 3.1 
Table 3.2: 
Table 33: 
Table 3.4: 
Table 3.5; 
Table 3.6: 
Table 3.7 
Table 3.8; 
Table 6.1 



Strategic Planning Process Steps k Timelitte, 2001-2002 3 

1990-2000 Regioruil Lodging Revenue Growth by Quarter 10 

Sportsmen Spending in Montana, 2000 17 

Commercial Air Service Enplanement Trends by City 24 

Commercial Air k Car Rental Service by Qty „...._„....___ 24 

2001 Uses of Montana Lodging Tax ___™»__„25 

Reasons for Montanans' Leisure Travel (in Rank Order) 47 

Origin of 2001 Nonresident Visitors ™49 

Top 10 States of Origin ™™ SO 

Primary Trip Purpose of Nonresident Visitors S6 

Nonresident Tourist Length of Stay Comparison 62 

2001 Nonresident Tourist Repeat Visitation Rate Comparison 62 

Montana's 2001-2002 Nonresident Target Markets 67 

Top U.S. Metro Market Sources of Iitquiries to Call Center 69 

Strategic Plan Objectives k Actioro 133 



Sidebars 

Sidebar 3.1 
Sidebar 3.2; 
Sidebar 3.3; 
Sidebar 3.4; 
Sidebar 3.5; 
Sidebar 3.6; 
Sidebar 3.7; 
Sidebar 3.8; 
Sidebar 3.9; 
Sidebar 3.10: 
Sidebar 3.11 
Sidebar 3.12; 
Sidebar 3.13; 
Sidebar 3.14 
Sidebar 4.1: 



National Retail Trends 44 

Destination Travelers to Montatva from 4 Key States 51 

Winter Trends: 2001 vs. 1993/1998 52 

Spring Travelers in 2001 „.........^.-. S3 

Summer Trends: 2001 vs. 1996 54 

What the Research Doesn't Tell Us S5 

Vacationer Characteristics by Season «. S7 

Pass-Through Traveler Characteristics. S8 

VFR Traveler Characteristics 59 

Business Traveler Characteristics » ~60 

Destination Traveler Characteristics »»>. 61 

Montana's Top Competitor States 64 

National Image of Montana » ..~..^..65 

Top Wority Target Markete _™. ~_68 

Montana Tourism k Recreation Stakeholders. — 80 



Acknowledgements 



Montana Depi of Commerce. & Promotion Division 

Mark Simonich, Department Director 

Betsy Baumgart, Division Admiiustrator 

Victor Bjomberg, Tourism Development Coordinator 

Pam Gosink, Group & Overseas Marketing Manager 

Carol Crocket, MTRI Coordinator 

Anna Marie Moe, Industry & Operations Administrator 

Corrie Hahn, Information Systems Maiuger 

Sarah Lawlor, Consumer Marketing Manager 

Mary Boyle, Publicity Coordinator 

Deb Williams, Photography 

Sten Iverseiv Montana Film Office 

Tourism Advisory Council (TAP 

Kathy Brown, Chair, Nicholson Inc., Helei\a 

Scott Asche, Holiday Inn, Bozeman 

Maureen Averill, Flathead Lake Lodge, Bigfork 

Kim Champney, Big Sky Airlines, Billings 

Debbie Donovan, Larslctn 

Ed HeruicK Fairmont Hot Springs, Anaconda 

Ramona Holt, H Bar R Ranches, Lolo 

Doima Madson, Yellowstone Tour & Travel, West Yellowstone 

Sharon Rau, Sidney Chamber of Commerce, Sidney 

Michele Reese, The Big Mountain, Whitefish 

Mike Scholz, Bucks T-4 Lodge, Big Sky 

Homer Staves, Staves Consulting, Billings 

Carolyn Valacich, Great Falls Symphony, Great Falls 

Clark Whitehead, BLM, Lewistown 

George Willett, Showdown Montana, Neihart 

Richard (RJ) Young, Fort Peck, Poplar 

Lynda Bourke-Moss, Billings (thru June 2002) 

Bob Dompier, Best Western Heritage Inn, Great Falls (thru June 2002) 

Kelly Flyim, Hidden Hollow Hideaway, Townsend (thru June 2002) 

Rick McCamley, The Pine Lodge, Whitefish (thru June 2002) 



Montana Tourism & Reaeation Initiative & Working Group 

Keith Thurkill (Chair), Tom Clifford & Amy Teegardeiv USFS 

Clint Blackwood, Montana Lewis & Qark Bicentennial Commission 

Scott Eckberg, NPS 

Shannon Heath, USFWS 

Cinda Holt, Montana Arts Council 

Darin McMurry, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

Amie Olsen & Ellen Baumler, MHS 

George Petemel, BLM 

aive Rooney, DNRC 

Pat Saindon, MDT 

Dave Sharpe, MSU Extension 

Chris Smith & Chas Van Genderen, FWP 

Jeff Tiberi, Montana Heritage & Preservation Development Commission 

Tourism Region & CVB Contacts 

Delores Tanglen, Joe Eckhardt, Linda Wolff & Jim Sdiaefer, Custer Country 

Linda Anderson & Ramona Holt, Glacier Country 

Sarah Bannon & Connie Kenney, Gold West Country 

Kim Lacey, Carla Hunsley & Doug Smith, Missouri River Country 

Gayle Fisher & Clark Whitehead, Russell Country 

Susan Albrecht, Scott Johnson & Terry Abelin, Yellowstone Country 

Mame Hayes & David O'Connor, Big Sky Chamber 

Rhonda Harms & Butch Ott, Billings CVB & Chamber of Commerce 

Cyndy Andrus, Bozeman CVB, & David Smith, Bozeman Chamlier 

Coniue Kenney & Eddie Steward, Butte-Silver Bow Chamt>er 

Kelly Shaffer & Rick Evans, Great Falls CVB & Chamber of Commerce 

Jennifer Bingham & Cathy Burwell, Helena CVB & Chamber of Commerce 

Carol Edgar, Kalispell/Flathead CVB & Joe Unterreiner, KaUspell Chamber 

Kim Latrielle, Missoula Chamber & Mary Lou Wilton & Mike Dickey, Missoula CVB 

Marysue Costello & Jeff Kurtz, West Yellowstone CVB 

Rhonda Fitzgerald & Chris Carter, Whitefish CVB 



Univ. of Montana Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research 

Norma Nickerson, Director 
Thale Dilloi\, Research Associate 



IdbiLIj 



IL). Yoiii«, Pmident Fort Pkdi 

Dtma MMtin. Vk> Profalcnt. Fact Briknap 

YTOnrnda Henri Thompaocv Stc/Tnm, Dull Knife Memorial College Exiefwian 

LiMnne Bcloourt Rocky Boy* 

RkhMd HopUrai BLM TriM Coofdlniiar 

ktedril iUn«Mihcr. LMk Blghom Calk«* 

KMMta Red Star Harriiv Crow Tribe 

Mator Robtaworv Norlhem Cheyeime 

Lucy Vanderbur^ The People't Center, Saliih-Kootenai 

Feral Warier, BtacUeet Tribe 

Gordon Beloourt MontaiWWyoining Tribal Leader* Coundl 

fWh»T Agftify CoiHacta 

Kurt Alme k Connie Deady, Montana Dept. of Revenue 

RabeocB Baumarav Made in Mcntaiu, Montana Dept of Conuneroe 

Ma Cortwrighl Montana Lewi* Ji dark Bicentennial Commiaaion 

David CSmcbv Cowctnar't OfBce of Eoonomic Oppottimity 

Margaret Conki USPS IMC Bioenlennial Coordinator, Miaaoula 

ferry Kaiaer, Bureau of IrKlian Affairs 

Marrfia Karte k Tammy Wert YeUowatone National Park 

Tod Kaaiefv Regional Development Officer, Montana Dept of Commerce 

Nancy Kraft. FWP Hunting k Fishing Licensing Division 

Ken LewH Fort Belkiup Tourism Director 

David Mailiiv Rcacardi Specialist Montana Department of Commerce 

SMky MdCamey, Muaeum of the Rockies 

Jerry Ndacrt dader National Park 

kCkeOUver. LAC Bicenten n ial Cdtyeaaional Caucus Field Liaison 

Ralph PKk k Lee Boycr, Dept of Agriculture 

|eri Mae Rowley, Montana Superhost', Flathead Valley Cmty College 

KenSodcttwrgAMaity Walkiru. Montana Dept. of FWP 

Roy Snyder. US. Army Corp* of Engiiwen, Fort Peck , 

Dick Turner, Jan Vogel k Mike Bousliman. MDT 

lane Weber, L&C NatT Hlaloric Trail Interpretive Center, Great Falls 



Gene BbckweO, Montana Recreation 4i Park* Association (MRPA) 
Glenn Bodirit Arts Chateau Museum, Uptown Butte 
Rosalie Caltik Miaaoula Community Devek>pment Corporation 
RoMn Cmninghaav PiMng Outfitter* Assn. of Montana (FOAM) 
ShiHt Donrtt MonlMa bmkMpm Association (MIKA) 
Dan Engrinov CMcfOivaoard Servicer, AMTKAK 
Btuor Fading MonlMa Trout UnUmHed 

Howard Mtttag, Virginia Tech Dept. of Hospitality k Tourism Management 
Loren Plyna Traveler's Rest Prcservatian k Heritage Aaaociation 
|ohn GatcheH Conservatian Director, k Margaret Webster. Eastern Wildland* 
Chapter, Montana Wildemeas Association 



Steve Colnar, Qly of Livingston 

Jill Hamiltorv Glasgow Chamber of Commerce 

Jean Johnaon. Montana Outfitter* k Guides Assodatkm (MOGA) 

Carl Kodunan. Don Serido k Brenda Peterson, Wendt-Kochman 

Kris Komar, Double K Outfit 

Naf«cy Korizek-Hincs k Shawn Crum. H20 Advertising 

Faye Lestmeister k Bill HowelL Montaiu Snowmobile Aaaodation 

Main Street Uptown Butte, ItK. 

Mark Martin, Missoula Cultural Council 

Jim McCowaa MARS STOUT 

Joy McGrath, Montana Shares 

Larry Mires k Duane Sibley, Fort Peck Interpretive Center 

Montana Ecxinomic Developers Association 

Montana Rural Development Partrwrs 

Lisa Perry, Northwest Airlines, Billings 

Irette Peterson, Best Ina Missoula 

Carol Place, Great Falls Historic Tour Trolley 

Kimberly Roth, Southgate Mall. Missoula 

Charlene Schuster. Montana Beef Coundl 

Craig Sharpe, Montana Wildlife Federation 

Dori Skruknid k Jon Sesso, Butte-Silver Bow Planning Dept 

Smith Travel Research 

Betty Stone, Cottonwood Ina Glasgow 

Amy Sullivaa Montana Tourism Coalition (MTQ 

Steve Thompson, National Parks Conservation Aasodatian 

Robin Urban, World Museum of Mining, Butte 

Joan Vetter Ehrenberg, Grouse Mountain Lodge 

Diaiw Wolfe, Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce 



The Planning Team 

The Hingston Roach Group, Inc. (206) 983-2175 

Lorraine Roach, Principal boachMhrgroup.com 

Ruth Mohr, Research Analyst rmoh itlugiu up.coin 

Amanda Crosby, Exec. Assistant ■cnxfa yilugnw p.cnm 

PO Box 400, 416 W. Main, Ste. Z GrangevUle, ID 83530 



Premier Planning 

Gail Brockbank, Principal 

PO Box 217, Helena. MT 59624 

Amy Hays 

103 QuaU Court KalispeU, MT 59901 



(406) 442-4141 
gailb«mtnet 

(406) 257-4212 
chanHmyCaoLoom 



Big Sky Value... 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 

Tourism and recreation in Montana are at an historic moment. Decisions made - and actions 
taken - in the next five years will affect Montana's environment, its economy and its citizens for decades. 
Those decisions and actions must be strategic, and consistent with the values and priorities of Montanans. 
As the state faces perhaps the largest tourism event in years - the Lewis & Clark Expedition Bicentennial 
- this Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan serves as a guide for tourism and recreation leaders as they 
develop plans and programs for the Bicentennial years and beyond. Tourism can enhance Montana's 
economy and create jobs, but it also can create challenges. The key is to target high-value, low-impact 
visitors; to focus resources strategically on sustainable tourism activity that enhances Montana's economy 
while meeting the needs of Montanans and nonresident visitors in a changing tourism marketplace. 
There is much at stake. 

Tourism is Montana's 2"'' Largest Industry, Generating $1.7 Billion per Year 

Montana hosted 9.6 million nonresident visitors in 2001. About 59% of them visited in summer, 
20% in winter, 11% in spring and 10% in fall. They had a tremendous economic impact on the state: 

♦ Nonresidents spent $1.7 billion in Montana; $1.2 billion for retail items, restaurant & beverage, 
gas and groceries, or 12% of all statewide sales in those retail goods categories 

♦ Tourists ate 110,000,000 meals in Montana, or 2.1 million per week; $332 million spent on 
restaurant meals and beverages, another $125+ million on groceries and snacks 

♦ Nonresident traveler expenditures accounted for $336 million in 2000 employee compensation 

♦ Approximately half of all commercial airline passengers flying to/from Montana in 2001 were 
nonresidents'; without tourism, Montana could lose a significant portion of its current airline 
service, negatively affecting other business sectors and economic development efforts 

Tourism is an essential element of Montana's economy. Tourism development strategies must be 
informed by - and integrated with - all of Montana's natural and economic assets: agriculture, mining, 
forestry, technology, manufacturing, construction and education. This Tourism and Recreation Strategic 
Plan was developed in the context of tourism's role in Montana's overall economic picture. 

Montanans view tourism as an essential component of the state's economy; however, they want 
the kinds of tourism that maximize benefits to their communities and businesses, while minimizing 



Executive 
Summary 



♦ Economic Impacts of Tourism 

♦ Tourism Challenges, Threats, 
Opportunities & Markets 

♦ Strategic Planning Process 

♦ 5- Year Tourism Strategy 

♦ Objectives & Actions 

<* Implementation & Timeline 



The 2003-2007 Strategic Plan will 
guide tourism & recreation in Montana 
for the next five years & beyond. 
There is much at stake. 




Tourists Qte 110,000,000 meals m Montana in 
2001, or 2.1 million per week, spending $332 
million in restaurants. Better linkages are 
needed between tourism & Montana agriculture. 



' Univ. of Montana Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research, Winter/Spring/Summer 2001; MDT-Aeronautics Division 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Executive Summary 



ES-1 



Spcndin9 ^ nonrcsklcnt Amncr travelers 
drococd by $28 5 million from 1996 to 2001 

NotiofialV. P*of>l« ore taking shorter 
wocatiow: Montono is at a disa<Kanto9e 
baeeum of its distoncc to major markets. 

Strategic, targeted promotions ore 
needed to mointoin Montono's marfcet shore 
ogoifSt increasing competition. 



Ctawmimty fironts (DOQ: 

Cm mmit f Toirn* Atim m w t 
Tounsm/Aec'fi Infrott . Eiients 

MT Fish. Wildlife A Pvfcs 

MT Htstoncol Society 
H«t*r««al tlt**/ti9ns 
Lit m a mH n m d CotwiM /ynwti 
Ci^ttel toirs. Scmer CoMiction 

MT I leritage Preaervation 
o Dcvdo^MMfvt ComfiNttioii 
Ac^HTt/iMnafC hwtonc property 

Umv. of MT/rntfi - Research 

MT Inft Trade Progrtm (tXXr) 

Agency Lodging Bembursemcnt 
State 4 



200.000 



706.819 
674.702 



2001 Ums «f Mfliitdm Ledgiiig Tax 

Tourism Promotion. DcVt i Stof f : 

Dept of Commerce* $6,294,078 

16 Tmnsm Begwns/CVBs 2.446.680 



400.000 

271.853 
200.000 
190.014 

Oept. of ae««iwe 115.395 

T«ic c e ts it >ew / o d wi w /«nforc m i » i»t 

TOTAL: $11,539,542 

* $2.6 mMiON fpwt on Mentora odvertising 



impacts on their own outdoor recreation experiences, and on Montana's outstanding natural, historic and 
cultural assets. 

Tourism Faces Challenges of Competition, Seasonal Declines and Impacts on Assets 

Tourism in Montana experienced extraordinary growth from 1990 to 2000; however, statewide 
activity has leveled off since 1998. In some areas , in certain seasons, tourist traffic or use is heavy and 
there are impacts. In other seasons and at other locations, facilities and services are utilized well below 
capacity. Challenges and threats related to Montana's tourism and recreation include: 

* Year-round tourism has increased, but summer visitation & spending dropped from 1996-2001; 
spending decreased by $28.5 million - average travel group size & length of stay decreased. 

* Hotel occupancies in Montana vary greatly by region & season, reaching 80% from July-SepL, 
but dipping below 60% from Oct.-May, which is below break-even point for most businesses 

* Tourism seasonality creates instability and increased costs in other sectors: labor, housing, 
finance, wholesale, retail, distribution, food & beverage, insurance and transportation all suffer 
when tourism drops - businesses/airlines must raise prices to make up for seasonal fluctuations 

* Montana is being outspent by other states as much as 10-to-1 in tourism promotion; and the 

slate has competitive disadvantages in image/distance from markets, requiring highly targeted 
marketing 

* Costs to operate and maintain natural/historic/cultural assets have increased with use, and 
stable funding sources are needed to prevent degradation and provide high quality experiences 

* Visitors seeking certain outdoor recreation activities impact Monlanans' recreation 
experiences, so a shift in target markets is needed to attract high-value, low-impact visitors 

* Conflicts about land/water access St management have escalated with increasing use; solutiona» 
' including compromises, limits & allocation, are needed to address management conflicts 

* Management of natural/historic/cultural assets & promotions requires accurate data tracking 
in order to determine visitor counts, trends, impacts & return on investment of promotion funds 

* Two-thirds of Montana businesses have fewer than 10 employees (excluding self-employed) - 
technical assistance is needed to maintain Montana's family-ownod businesses 

* Montana's lodging tax was created to fund tourism promotion, research it industry education 
(similar to a commodity "check-off" program); diversion of the funds for other purposes will 
diminish their effectiveness, creating a downward spiral of tourism revenues 

* Strong teams tt partnerships are needed to successfully implement the Tourism Strategic Plan 



ES-2 



Execimvc Summary 



Montana Tourism tt Rfcrfatkin Strati«c Pt an 2003-2007 



Changing Tourism Trends Present New Market Opportunities for Montana 



Nationally and internationally, the tourism industry has changed dramatically over the past 
decade. Customer tastes, preferences and travel planning methods are very different. So are 
transportation and Montana's national and international competition. These trends offer Montana 
opportunities to focus on attracting high-value, low-impact tourists: 

♦ The Time Crunch Affects Travel Planning: weekend trips (1-5 nights) are up 70% in past 
decade to 54% of all U.S. travel; longer trips declining; 59 million people use Internet to plan trips 

♦ Women Make the Decisions: women make 75% of all travel decisions; top concerns are safety, 
hygiene, "creature comforts," shopping, convenience ("one-call," all-inclusive packages) 

♦ Mature Travelers Rule: Americans over 50 comprise 80% of all leisure travel; control 75% of the 
nation's wealth; seek active experiences, heritage/culture, soft adventure; travel in off-peak times 

♦ Family Values are Back (Families are Blended & Multi-Generational): family travel is up; seek 
value for the money, variety of things to do, activities designed (and packaged) for kids 

♦ History & Culture are the #1 Attraction: 65% of all U.S. travelers include heritage/cultural 
experiences on their vacations; segment is more educated/affluent than average traveler 

♦ Festivals Attract One-Fifth of All Travelers, esp. Young Families: most popular events are 
music, ethnic/folk/heritage, county/state fairs, parades, food festivals and religious festivals 

♦ Rural Places are Appealing: 62% of all U.S. adults visited small town/village; 33% took kids 

♦ Packaged Niche Products are Key to Success: travelers want experiences tailored to their tastes 

♦ Business Travelers Deserve More Attention: business travelers spend most, stay 3.3 nights, 
combine business with vacation travel; potential targets for Montana business recruitment efforts 

♦ Non-Business Meetings & Conventions are Big Business: 27 million U.S. attendees in 1999; 
most popular are religious, self-improvement/education, hobby-related; spent $529/trip 

♦ Canadians are Returning: visitation to U.S. up 9% from 1998-2000; 59% planning/considering 
travel to U.S. in 2002; 81% prefer packaged vacations, like deals; 87% will use Internet to plan 

♦ Europeans Spend Five Times More Time & Money: $l,530/trip; like rural places, off-peak times 

♦ Adventure and Geo-Tourists are Large Markets: 92 million soft adventure (camping, hiking, 
biking, skiing, horseback riding), 31 million hard adventure (rafting, climbing, mtn biking) 

♦ Sportsmen Numbers Remain Steady, More Women Join the Club: 2/3 are men, but women 
catching up; hunter #'s up 250,000+ nationally 1998 to 1999; more fishermen traveling to fish 

♦ Tourists Shop 'Til They Drop: #1 activity of leisure travelers (63% shop), l-in-5 spend $500+ 

♦ Montanans Spent $707 Million Outside the State in 1999: 75% of Montanans take one or more 
leisure trips annually (higher than national average), spent $962 million in 1999 (9.5% of income) 



Market Opportunities for Montono 

Attract higher-value, lower-impact visitors: 
* Create weekend getaway packages targeting 
nearby metro markets in shoulder seasons 
Promote "softer side,' amenities to women 
Target mature travelers, provide services 
Create packages/destinations for families 
Showcase Montana's heritage/culture 
Promote festivals & events, esp. LAC events 
Focus on rural appeal, but nearby amenities 
Develop specialty/niche packages & products 
Encourage extended stays, add-ons for 
business travelers 

Attract more meetings <S conventions 
Increase promotions targeting Canada 
Promote specialty itineraries for Europeans 
Highlight guided (vs. self -guided) adventures 
Promote limited ouided hunting & fishing for 
highest return, lowest impact on residents 
Showcase Montana's unique shops, products 
Encourage Montanans to visit their backyard, 
keep more 'Montana money* ot home 




Beartooth Highway 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Executive Summary 



ES-3 



A 1999 Study of consumers in four key 
iMctropoirtan travel markets rcwaoicd 
potcntiol trovckr imogts about Montono: 

Ro«itn>€ ImoQCS 

• Vast, uflspotkd bndscapcs 

• Mountoins. antcr 

• Fistiing. Kunting. hiking, camping 

• Wtstcm cultw«: 'Cot^ofi A Indians' 

• Lacks sophisticaf K>n. cufture. arts 

• Fear high gualrty amenities 

• Things ta 'sw*. but not to *do* 

• Not •kid-friendly'. safety concerns 

• Hard to access, dif f icuH to purchase 

S«rt« MT bMf« A Potitwmng Asmsoti 1. 12/99 



MsntOM's Cemp«tit<v« Advontogt 

The advantages that Montono has over 
Its competitor states can be summarized by 
the f oNoOTng descnptorr. 



Clean or ond aater 

HeoHhy and abundant anUlife 

Outstondmg hiftoncol attroctions 

(authentic, not 'Disney^ 

2.000 miles of the Lewis A Ckrk Trail 

Cosuol but classy culturol A urban 

amenities 

Safe 

6ood highway/rood system 

Ccnuine. friendly people 

£ood value for the money 



Montana's Competition has Similar Attractions, Better Access by Air 

Research by the American Travel Survey shows that Montana's main competitor states are 
California, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Oregon, South Dakota, Arizona and Colorado. They, loo, 
offer outstanding natural landscapes, national parks, and interesting history and historical sites. But they 
have advantages in a number of key areas: 

• More urban amenities: shopping, dining, culture 

• High quality entertainment (opportunities to enjoy "name" entertainment and nightlife) 

• More packaged, age-appropriate activities for children 

• Convenient access (especially direct flights from major metro areas) 

Top Priority Target Markets Emphasize High- Value, Low-Impact Visitors 



The planning team recommends the 
following demographic and geographic target 
markets, based on an analysis of current trends, 
conditions, challenges, threats and Montana's 
tourism vision, goals and competition: 

Demographic 

• Mature travelers, income $75,000+ 

• Couples, income $75,000+ 

• Conventions tt meetings, esp. non-business 

• Heritage/cultural travelers, esp. L&C 

• Families with children, income $75,000+ 

• Guided adventurers, income $75,(XX)+ 

Geographic 

• Nearby states/provinces for weekend 
getaways, conferences, skiers 

• California for vacationers 

• Southwest for matures 

• Midwest for families, skiers 

• Eastern metro markets for vacationers 

• Europe for couples, families, adventurers 

• Montanans for more money kept at home 



Montana's 2000-2001 Nonresident Tourist Markets 




From ITRR Peseorch: 

5 Winter 

6 Spring 
v Summer 
% Foil 

From FWP License Sales: 



rrofn Intcrwt Coiwcrsiofi RcMorch* 
I MT Web Site Users 

State^wnol Targets 2001: 
W Ti 



Trovel Montono 
A Region/CVB 



' Nonresident Fi s he r men 



ES-4 



ExEcvnvH Summary 



Montana Tourism & Rfcrcation Straikx: Pi an 200)-2007 



Tourism Strategic Planning Process was Inclusive & Multi-faceted 

This Strategic Plan contains many "fingerprints" - the ideas, concerns, input and wisdom of 
Montanans from many communities, sectors and organizations. Plan stakeholders - the partners -- 
include private businesses, regional tourism organizations, chambers of commerce, convention & visitors 
bureaus, state and federal agencies, universities and colleges, tribes, heritage and cultural organizations, 
business trade associations, agriculture organizations, sportsmen's and conservation groups, and elected 
officials. 

The Plan was developed on the principles of community-based strategic planning, involving 
partners at all levels in a collaborative planning process. Public outreach was key to the plan's 
development (see figure to the right). This Strategic Plan, completed in Fall 2002, reflects local values and 
priorities regarding tourism development, potential impacts, long-term economic diversification and 
promotion. Successful implementation will require strategic cooperation and assistance of all partners. 

Stakeholders Identified Vision, Guiding Principles, Goals, Objectives & Actions 

At the initial public meetings that identified the elements of Montana's vision for tourism in 2007 
(and t>eyond), there was surprising consensus expressed by Montanans from a wide variety of 
perspectives, sectors and geographic locations. The vision statement has five components presenting a 
"desired future condition" for tourism and recreation in Montana. Below is a summary of the vision : 

VISION: It is the year 2007. Tourism and recreation in Montana has achieved the following: 

Balance . Montana's unique character and sense of place are retained while providing quality experiences 
for both residents and nonresident visitors 

Cooperation . Effective public-private-nonprofit-tribal partnerships are engaged in visionary, collaborative 
planning and implementation efforts which foster economic growth and stability, while respecting the 
values of Montanans. 

Support . Sufficient financial and technical assistance are available from various sources to support 
effective tourism marketing/research, management of natural/historic/cultural assets, and business 
development. 

Respect . Tourism is recognized as an essential element of Montana's economy and social well-being. 

Accountability . A comprehensive evaluation system is being used to measure and track the success and 
the impacts of tourism development and marketing, consistent with the strategic goals and objectives. 



Strategic Plan Public Outreach 
Efforts included the Following: 

8 public meetings, 400 attendees 
(Kalispell, Missoula, 6reat Falls. Billings, 
Miles City, Glasgow, Bozeman and Butte) 
Meetings with industry, og, conservation, 
culture and other stakeholder groups 
Presentations to TAC, MTRI, 
regions/CVBs and Governor's Conference 
on Tourism (October 2001, Februory, 
April, June and October 2002) 
Online survey of representatives from 75 
stakeholder groups, 250 participants 
Direct communication with stakeholder 
representatives, over 650 comments 
Public comment throughout process 



'For the first 100 years of its history, 
Montana was a 'Company Town. ' We have not 
yet built a strong entrepreneurial legacy in this 
state. ' 

- Local Montana Economic t>evek)pinent Director 



Physical Assets 
(places, facilities, 
sites, attractions 

infrastructure) 




Past A 
Current 
Tourism 
Trends 
(state/nat'l) 



Resources 

(organizations 

ogencies, fundini_ 

tech'l assistance' 



Socio-Economic 

Trends (industry, 

population, 

employment) 



Services, 
Events & 
Activities 



State/Peglonal 
Programs A 
Promotion 



Information-gathering for Strategic Plan 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Executive Summary 



ES-5 



e 
m 

E 



Strategic Plan's AAorket-Dnven Approach Strategic Plan has a Market-Driven Approach: Serve Needs of Montanans & Visitors 

Successful tourism and recreation require a market-driven approach (see figure at left). In this 
case, Montanans and nonresidents are the markets, or "Demand". The product, or "Supply", is the 
tourism and recreation products/services offered by the public, private and nonprofit sectors (parks, 
forests, hotels, restaurants, tours, events, airlines, museums, etc.). The quality and success of the product 
depends upon the building blocks of effective business support services (technical, financial), adequate 
infrastructure to support tourism (transportation, signs, restrooms, telecommunications services, etc.), 
and balanced management of Montana's natural, historic, and cultural assets. The "Foundation" of the 
system is effective, informed planning and partnerships, with adequate funding for implementation. The 
link between Supply and Demand is communication: marketing, promotion and public relations. 



'1 




a 
a 
a 



c 

9 

e 



Tourism/ Racreation 

Products ft Services 



Business 
Support 



Infra- 
structure 



Assets 

Managemi 



L:' 



Planning, Partnerships, Funding 
(Implementation System) 



Iiifrdttnictix refers to toinsm-rclatcd fociktics. 
•mtfariatien. utilities, etc 
t rafars t* suetanoble monagement 
of MTs nstwl. hifteric A cuftvrol ousts. 



Strategic Plan Guiding Principles 

• Serve Montorxins' needs first 

■ Manoge for sustainobility 

• Moximize economic & social 
bentfiU 

• Retoin local control 

■ Respect Diverse needs & 
perspectives 

• Collaborate to resolve issues 



Guiding Principles Define the Plan's Values, or "Moral Compass" 

There are many ways to "do" tourism. Montana businesses, citizens and stakeholder groups 
who participated in the planning process expressed that tourism in Montana should be a high quality 
experience which respects and celebrates Montana's unique heritage and character, not a "tacky tourist 
trap." They also want tourism to be sustainable: tourism should contribute to the economy without 
sacrificing long-term benefits for short-term profits. 

The Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan is guided by six principles. These principles 
reflect the values, or "moral compass," expressed by Montana citizens through the planning process. 
They are the standards by which all tourism and recreation programming and actions should be 
evaluated and prioritized. The guiding principles are: 

♦ Serve the needs of Montanans first : retain Montana's character, sense of place and assets while 
providing economic benefits for citizens and businesses 

♦ Manage for sustainable, high-quality visitor experiences: practice good stewardship 

♦ Maximize economic and social benefits by targeting high-value, low impact visitors 

♦ Retain local control of decision-making about types and quantities of visitors to invite 

♦ Respect diverse needs, perspectives and concerns in tourism planning and promotion 

♦ Collaborate to resolve issues through posifive, inclusive, solutions-based processes 

If tourism and recreation planners, marketers and stakeholders adhere to these principles as they 
implement strategic actions over the next five years and beyond, Montana can achieve the vision for 
tourism outlined on the previous page. 



ES-6 



ExEcimvE Summary 



MOt4TANA TCXnUSM it RECREATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 



Seven Strategic Goals Provide Framework for Plan's Objectives & Actions 

There are seven broad goals toward which action will be focused to attain the vision for 2007: 

1. Enhance awareness and support for tourism and recreation among Montana citizens and elected 
officials, including additional funding sources to support sustainable tourism. 

2. Increase four-season tourism revenues in all regions of the state, through enhancement of 
products/services that focus on high-value, low-impact visitors, especially heritage and cultural 
tourists. 

3. Implement a more coordinated, proactive system to manage, enhance and protect Montana's natural, 
historical and cultural assets with balanced, sustainable levels of resident and nonresident visitor use. 
Improve and maintain tourism and recreation infrastructure to support high quality resident and 
nonresident visitor experiences. 

Nurture desirable business growth and diversification in the tourism and recreation industry through 
business support services and technical assistance. 

Communicate with the markets through highly targeted promotions that increase awareness and 
attract desirable tourists; measure, track and evaluate tourism results and trends. 
Build an effective tourism and recreation "team" to facilitate partnerships, share information and 
leverage funding/technical resources in order to realize the vision for 2007. 



4. 



5. 



7. 



'Tourism and recreation are crucial 
components of a healthy society. Just as 
essential as other state services such 
as schooling, sanitation, and justice. 
The vision for tourism and recreation in 
Montana should reflect that. ' 

- Citizen at public meeting 




Canoeing on the Missouri River 



Strategic Framework has 3 Elements: Information, Assets & Teams 

To accomplish the strategic goals, the planning team worked with Montana's tourism and 
recreation stakeholders to identify specific objectives and actions. The seven goals originally generated 
forty-two objectives and one hundred and fifty specific actions. Those objectives and actions were then 
prioritized, consolidated and grouped into three key elements that make up the strategic framework: 

1 . Managing Information 

2. Managing (the Use of) Assets 

3. Creating Teams 

Collection and dissemination of accurate information is critical to good business decisions, asset 
management decisions and public policy. As visitation, or use, increases, the level of asset management 
also must increase ("the more guests you have in your home, the more you must vacuum the carpet"). 

The key to effective implementation of the Strategic Plan actions is to build stronger collaborative 
teams at the state and regional levels between private, public, tribal and nonprofit sector partners. 



'Vision is the world's most desperate need. 
There are no hopeless situations, only people 
who think hopelessly. ' 

- Winifred hJewman 




New Montana Rest Area Design 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Executive Summary 



ES-7 



of^sfSpK nan rnonry ncnoti ^f^os 



' Build oworeness: totnsm A lodging tax 

• Coordinotc ads A promotion: state. 
reg<o<M - public rclottons. pockoging 

- Trocking i research 

- Develop MT Mche in focused markets 

- Info-sharing: coltect/dtsseminote 

Mwgliig (Use of) Assets: 

- Bobncc bctvpccn asset protection i 
visitor /business needs 

• Access to public/prraote lands 

• Transportation system A signs 

- 6ood ste«*ardship of noturol/ 
historic/ cultural assets, some limits 

- Visitor informotion/interpretation 

• Enhanced communities, facilities 

C^MtVI0 Tmmw^ 

- Unitages bctticen ogncultire A tourism 

- Partnerships to oddrcss asset mgmt 

• Business assistance 

- Entrepreneurial opportunities 

• Funding partnerships/other sources 

- Enhanced 'edu-structure' 

- Effective Ptan mplementation 



System of Touristt* & Recreation Communication, 
Organization Relationships & Funding 



Si«po>f 

PBrtntrt 


Tourists 

MonUnans / Nonresidents 


• 

RtgionaVLocal 




/ 


\ P9rfn0n 




OOC 

TAC 

Slate/Fod 
Aganoet* 

UM/ITRR 

MTTA 

Ad Agency 


/ 


/ 


\ 


s. 


Bat. Cofnmunities 

CVB». Ch«mb«f» 

Nonprofits 

Agertcias Tnb«« 

Trad* Groups/MTC 

Consarvstion/WHdlifa 

Sportsmen 

Elw:«ed Offioalt 
(Fed Stale Local) 


/ 


6 Tourism 
Regions 


\ 








<^ 


.<>. 


> 










sj"*""" 


■■■■ V 



Strategic Plan Contains 22 Objectives, 94 Actions and Priorities for Implementation 

Over the next five years, Montana's tourism and recreation partners will have ample oppmrtunity 
and incentive to build stronger collaborations as they work to achieve the Strategic Plan's objectives and 
actions. A Strategic Plan Objectives and Actions quick reference spreadsheet is contained in Table ES-1. 

Not all the Plan's actions will or can be implemented immediately. The strategic planning team 
developed a priority list of actions based on the context of current tourism trends and challenges, as well 
as balance and capacity among the partners and their resources. These are summarized in the box at left. 

The Implementation System: Enhanced Partnerships, Regional/Local Involvement 

During the past decade, Montana's lead tourism players have focused primarily on promotion 
activities - building Montana's image and "getting the word out" beyond the state's borders. The success 
is evident. To be responsive to the future needs of Montanans, and to changing markets, a broader, more 
collaborative role is needed. Effective implementation of this Plan - to best serve the customer and the 
tourism industry (private, public, tribal and nonprofit stakeholders) - requires enhanced partnerships. 

The tourism communication system depicted below can tap additional resources: more partners 
bring more resources to the table. There are numerous federal, corporate and foundation programs 
available for tourism and recreation-related projects, if they are linked to economic development, 
heritage/culture, value-added agriculture, transportation, conservation and education. By reaching out to 
other partners, tourism stakeholders can create win-win programs to achieve the vision and goals 
identified in this Strategic Plan. They therefore can preserve the lodging tax for its original intent: 

promotion, research and stakeholder education, and they can work with 
partners to obtain other funds to accomplish additional actions that support 
community values and high-value, low-impact tourism and recreation. 



Next Steps Require Teamwork & Collaboration to Achieve 
Vision and Goals 

Extraordinary opportunities await Montana's tourism and recreation 
stakeholders! True teamwork and collaboration will result in achieving the 
vision and goals described in this Strategic Plan. The Plan provides the 
blueprint for action. It is now up to all of Montana's tourism and recreation 
partners, including elected leaders, to seize the opportunity and move forward 
proactively with implementation of this Plan. The result will be economic 
development and quality of life benefits for all Montanans. 



> nVP, MHt. Mtn. MAC. DOR. MftrOC. UeUMSU. DNMC. {ttft. BIM. NPS, MfYlt. COE. BIA. BON 



ES« 



ExECimvE Summary 



Mom- ANA Tourism & Recreation STRAiEcac Pi.an 2OO3-2O07 



Table ES.l: Strategic Plan Objectives and Actions 



Objective 

Action 




Timing 


Partners 
(Sec page ES-12 for key to codes) 


Priority 


03 


04 


05 


06 


07 


A. AAonoging Information 
















A.l Maintain the Atontano Lodging Tax for Tourism Pronwtion and Development 
















A. 1.1 Build citizen awarzr^ss about benefits/impacts of tourism and uses of lodging tox 




A.1.2 Build awareness among elected of f iciols about tourism's impacts and benefits 


1 


F 


w> 


^TR,CVB,DOC,TAC,MTC,BTA,Biz>(TRlJTW»>»OJ«TTA 


A.I.3 Seek endorsements from communities and "non-tourism" organizations 


2 


jMTC,BTA,NPO,CVB,TR,t>OC,TRB,TAC 


A.Z Conduct Stt^tegic Promotions that Attract Top Priority Markets 




1 1 1 


A. 2.1 Coordinote advertising to maximize state, regional & private Return on Investment 




■■■■■■lAd, DOC,-m,CVB,Biz,Attn 


A.2.2 Encouroge cross-promotion between tourism partners and sectors 


' r 


I 1 j 30OC>d,DOAg,NPO,TR,BTA,Trb,Bii 


A.2.3 Consider options for film production incentives 


3 


^^^H 1 |DOC,TAC,'m,CVB,Biz | 


A.2.4 Plan for promotion of special events <& challenges 


3 






■^■■C>OC>ALCBC,'m,CVB,NPS,Biz,Ad/WP | 


A. 3 Create New Tourism & Recreation Products through Packaging 












A. 3.1 Aiseis potential for local/regional pocl<ages. & coordinote suppliers 


2 








TR,CVB,Biz.Attn, NPO,0OC,Trb 


A. 3.2 Promote off-peal< weekend getaway packages/events to "nearby" markets 


2 


^^^^^^^^■0OC,TR,Biz,CVB 1 


A.3.3 Capture more poss-through travelers with mini-packages 


2 


^ 




aBiz,CVB,Attn,TR,t>OC,Trb,CC | 


A. 4 Create New "OMliiMtiaM" with Special Designations & Events 












A.4.1 Work with MbT A Icgiskiture to implement Montana byways 4 corridors programs 


2 




Bi^^ 




MDT,TR,Trb,N(>0,Biz>*HS,CVB,L6,CC.DOC 


A.4.2 Use colloborotive efforts to create special designation areas 


2 




« 




MDT,TR,CC,CVB,DOC,NPO.Trbi6.Biz 


A.4.3 Seek opportunities to host nationol/internotional sports competitions 


3 




CVB,Biz,TR,0OC,L6 


A. 5 Enhance Atontana's Winter Recreation Products/Services 












A.5.1 Refine Montana's niche in the destination ski market A snowmobile markets 


1 




.4mmi 


"~dDOC,BTA,Ad,Biz 


A.5.2 Package skiing & snowmobiling with other activities 


2 








jBTA,-ra,CVB,Biz,Attn.NPO 


A. 5. 3 Expond "altcrnotivc" winter activities 


2 


fad^HfiHttMlTR.CC,CVB,Biz,Attn>JI>0, Trb | 


A. 6 Attract More Meetings & Conventions to Montana 












A.6.1 Refine Montana's niche and "brand" in the meeting/convention market: 


J 


^^H ''-"'"'' 








CVB,CiOC.BTA,Biz,Ad,L6 


determine feasibility of enhanced facilities 


2 










CVB.DOC,BTA,Biz,AdJ^ 


A.6.2 Conduct troining on the needs i trends of meeting/convention morkets 


2 








i 


I 


CVB,D0C,Bi2,BTA,Univ 


A.6.3 Use tecal historicol/cultural ottroctk>ns to enhance venue offerings 


2 




■Ml 




J 


CVB,TR.8i2,Attn,MAC>»HS, NPO 


A. 7 Enhance System of Tracking, Analysis A Information Dissemination for Stakeholders 














A.7.1 Continue strategic research about resident & nonresident travelers 


1 




ITOJ,BBER,C>OC,TAC,TRJI*U:BC,SA,FA.Biz 


A.7.2 Regukirly measure AAontanans' opinions about tourism it recreation 


1 






ITRR,0OC,TACJ«TRl,SA,FA,Bii 


A.7.3 Conduct regukir conversion reseorch to measure results of marketing efforts 


2 




DOC,-rajTRR.Ad,CVB 


A.7.4 Establish a central "cleoringhouse" for data collection, analysis and reporting 


1 








ITRR,DOC,TR,MTia,CVB,Attn.8iz. MTTA 


A.7.5 Create a statewide "baseline" database of tourism & recreation assets 


2 








ITRR,0OC,TR,DOft,MTRI,8TAJ*RPAJWTTA 


A.7.6 Enhance doto-gathering systems at attractwns 4 VlC's 


1 






MTRI,TR,VIC,CVB,CC,Trb,DOCJTRR 


A.7.7 Upgrade lodging tax reporting systems at AAontono Department of Revenue 


2 ^M 






DOR,DOC,BTA,ITRR 


A.7.8 Coordinate with the private sector for enhanced tracking/reporting 


3 


^g^ 


CVB,CC,TR,BTA,ITRR,t>OC 


A. 8 Create a Connected System to Shore Information i Resources 




\\ 




A.8.1 Crtate a tourism & recreation tistserv to share information 


1 ■^■HH 


H! 




m?R.DOCJ*TCJWTRI>ATTA,TR.NPO 


A.8.2 Creote o dotobose of tourism/recreation technical & funding resources 


3 1 H' ' 






■^ C MEDA.BBeRA«DP,OU 


A.6.3 Share information atxxit state/regional advertising pkins to facilitate coordination 


1 


■ 


■H^ 




., 


a0C,Ad,TR,CVB,Biz 


A. 8.4 Enhance shoring of tourism 4 recreation photo libraries 


3 


1 






DOC,TR,CVB,NPO,MTRI 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Executive Summary 



ES-9 



Toblt ESI: Strategic Plon Objectives ond Actions 



Ob>*ct*ii« 

Action 




TllfwHJ 


Portt««r« 
(So* poga ES- 12 for key to codti) 


»norir) 


03 


04 


05 


06 


07 


B. Managing tftc Um of Assets 
















6 1 5««k Botonc* B«r««n AtMt Prattcti«n A Vititor/Busincsi N*«d> 
















• 1 1 CaKpi\» «< MMKtory/cvakMtiefi of >ianral/)u(tonc/cumrol oncts i focilitiu 




1 


- 








SAfA.Trt.L6.H>0»>tM'nilJtl»A 




> 1 




1 










i' 





MsAfA.Tri>)*OjLi9fiW ConmK.OlJ 








OIB Loj.SAf A8TA 








■ 




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FA,[X)A9.extJ.0.f*0 


• 2 Addms Aeaam Imma m PubNc A fH«««« Undi A WaMrt 


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> t 






. 


SAF* Trb>»OAO 




' L 


FWPJ.O,TR.NPO 


S2 3 Un ipaorf fr«<«* *o feciWtot* <*«cun«n of ococn to pubhc/prnat< landi A mattrt 


2 k -^ 


.■«■, -«•■>' 


JSA/A,NPO.TI».Trb 


t 3 Dewlap an Enhanced Transportation Syitcn tn Montana 


r _ 






1 


B 3 I A^tonc* mpHmm'^a^iC^ of Mortono t rest ar«o ftrotc^y 


' PH 


^ 




Wm)H>T.ooc.-ni.ccyic.NPO 




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B33 «ltaHiwt«iarc*nar«/a>parttteidntifyiiMdiA«iihaiic*airnrvioi 


< U 






«Mt)T.DOC.TO,CVB*i 






■ 








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• 39 WeHiartticarrantalaftKiateKkKtifyiiMdtAciAaKtMrvtoM 




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1- 








VM TBCC.NPS.Attn.B.iJdUTJIMe* 


• 3 7 Extaoct Montana' (trail rr«t«m 


~^TB 








MO T JWTW ,STAC>*Oi6.Tr**2 W) 
































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• 42 Edi>cat«Mirtar«aboutathKSandrapont>b<liticso<iput>hcApHM««fan^ 




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t § 1 i^H^^HMHS/A.Trt>.Unv/WP | 


•.9 Im^nm SUHmkia Systoin of Highiray St^m 


1 ^ 


'I 




• ) 1 0«T<iap/iyl«— Bt Ufn guKklmu for MrvKSi. ottroctioM 4 buWiMHII 




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MDTDOC.TnjMCojMLrrjBtiJMHS^TA.Trfc. MTTA 








MDT.OOC.TH*! 


• 9 3 AdAvai appropnota i«(/ptacaiMrt of txtlbaard] while moixtoinnq bfldioipcs 




T li I'H'M TD uhT B.,;iMajwrT 1 


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till 


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1 ■^■■■■■■■■tXXifi.Ext.ITDR 


M7 Ciiiawi>» r«»w of oty/eawrty/tnbol iiif rottmctura i publK MrvtcM 








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2 B 1 1 1 1 flMLCTAlAa.DOOeDA 1 



ES-10 



ExECimvF Summary 



MOIMTANA TOURC<M & RECRFJ^TION STRATEGIC Pi AN 2003-2007 



Table ES.l: Strotegic Plan Objectives and Actions 



Objective 

Action 




Timing 


(See page ES-12 for key to codes) 


Priortt) 


03 


04 


OS 


06 


07 


C. Creating Teams 
















C.l Identify Opportunities to Link Agriculture with Tourism 
















C.1.1 Create meciionisms for tourism businesses to use Montana agricultural products 


^^^H 


yHJi'^A9'BTA.TR.CC,B<z | 


C.1.2 Enhance existing programs with focus on tourist markets 








1 


^■DOAg.DOC,NPO.Biz.TR | 


C.l. 3 Develop cooperative morketing campaigns between agriculture and tourism 






1 


0OC,Ad.BTA,Biz.DOAg 


C.1.4 Educate visitors about Montana agriculture i ranching 




■■lllli 


C>OAg,TR.CVB,NPO,B.z 


C.Z CrMt* Partnerships to Address Asset Management A Funding Noads 


1 1 








C.2.1 Identify opportunities for partnerships to address asset needs 


> Hl^Bk 




MTRI^A.FA.NP0.TR.Bi2.Trb 


C.2.2 Evaluate agency regukitions & policies to determine differences in priorities/programs 


-T-Mf^- 






MTRI 


C.2.3 Encourage citizens to volunteer for osset maintenance projects 


> i^ 




|H^^^HsA.FA.NP0,Trb | 


C.3 Increase Awareness & Utilization of Business Assistance Programs 


L 


m 


Bra 




■^ 




C.3.1 Provide informotion obout business assistance to tourism d recreation businesses 


» m 


DOC.TR,BTAJttTTA 


C.3.2 Offer entrepreneurship & management training for tourism & recreation businesses 






^ 


-: 




iDOC4BDC.TR.BIZ 


C.3.3 Address workforce issues A training programs 


2 


^iDU.TR 


C.3.4 Encourage financial lending to provide capital for tourism & recreation businesses 


2 ^^^^^^^^^^Hdoc^bdcmeda I 


CA Identify Business Opportunities to Serve Visitors on Public Unds 




III! 1 


CA.l Identify opportunities for new or enhanced tourism/recreation services 








SA.FA,Bi2 


CA.Z Discuss ways to simplify regulations & permitting processes while protecting assets 










^ 


SA,FA,NPO,BTA,Biz 


C.4.3 Investigate contracting of maintenance operations to private businesses 










J 


SA.FA 


C.5 Enhance /Montana's "Edu -Structure" to Support Tourism 










1 




C.5.1 Expand education programs for tourism & recreation careers 




C.5.2 Oevetop a stof f training progrom for VIC's 




i^ 




DOC.VIC.TR,CVB.CC 


C.5.3 Provide regional familiarization tours for state/regional/tribal/k)cal tourism staff 






— 


: TR,DOC,VIC.Attn,Bii 


C.5.4 Include educational presentations at tourism & recreotion meetings & events 




i TAC,TR.CVB.MTRI 


C5.5 Work with MSU to create "tourism extension agents'* in each tourism region 




T 


mm 




_J|MSU.0OC.DOAg,TR 


C.6 Build Funding Partnerships to Uverage Existing Dollars 










1 


C.6.1 Encourage strategic partnerships for cooperative project funding 




imir*" 


--' 




-■jsA,FA,TR.CVB.CC,BizNPO 


C.6.2 Identify opportunities to pool public & private marketing dollars 






lTR.CVB,Biz.DOC.Attn.Ad 


C.7 Develop Additional Funding Sources for Tourism 4 llccreation 














C.7.1 Consider selective and/or local option taxes on goods 4 services used by tourists 




^m 


■''HH 


Leg.MACo,MU:T,BTA,Biz 


C.7.2 Evoluote expansion of user fees for public focility recreation 






^H 1 i 


SA,FA,NPO 


C.7.3 Encouroge ottractkins to generate more revenue from visitors 








M 


iMHS.FWP,MRPA.DOC.NPO.Biz 


C.7.4 Develop local/regional revenue-sharing visitor pockoges 






1 


TB.CVB.DOC.Biz.Attn.NPO 


C.7.5 Create a "Montana Visitor Passport" program 








^ 


MTRI .DOC.TR.Attn.NPO.Biz.Ad 


C.7. 6 Seek additional revenue for the Block Manogement program 








FWP,LO,NPO 


C.8 Develop Portnerships to Facilitate Implementation of Strategic Plan 
















C.8.1 Conduct workshops at TAC meeting & in each region to discuss pkin implementation 














TR,D0C,CV8,SA/A>»0,Biz 


C.8.2 Conduct training for region/CVB boards of directors i members 












■re.CVB.DOC 


C.8.3 Obtain funding to enhance regional tourism orgoniiotions 








DOC.TR.TACfA 


C.8.4 Coordinate Strategic Plan implementotion i monitoring through DOC 






H 




■ 


DOC>»Tia.FWP 


C.8.5 Form on implementation team of privote/public/tribol/nonprof it representotives 






Mm 


DOC.TAC.MTCJ«TRI.Trb.NPO,eiz 


C.8.6 Coordinate with Sovernor's Office of Economic Opportunity 






• mil" "^j ooc J«TC,8TA,MEDA 


C.8.7 Develop a user-friendly system of annual reporting on status of strategic pkin 






^DOCMTRI.TR.CVB.NPOJIATTA 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Executive Summary 



ES-11 



Action Tobic Key to Codes 



Ad Advertising Agency MHS 

Attn Attroction MLTT 

Bi2 Pnvote Sector Business AALCBC 

BTA BusirKSS Trade Associations AARDP 

B8EC Bureau of Business/Economic Devlpmt MRPA 

CC Chamber of Convnerce MSU 

CV8 Conventton/Visitor Bureau MTC 

DU Montana Dept of Lobor and Industry MTRI 

DOAg /Montana t)ept of Agncultvre MTTA 

DOC /Montana Dept. of Convnerce NPO 

DOR /Montana Dept. of ttevenue MPS 

Ext Ag Extension Service OLB 

FA Federal gov't/ Agency RCAD 

FWP /Montana Fish. Wildlife & Parks SA 

ITRft U of M Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research SBDC 

Leg /Montana Legislature STAC 

\A Local 6overr«nent TAC 

LO Land Owner TR 

MAC /Montana Arts Council Trb 

MACo Montana Association of Counties Univ 

MOT /Montana Dept of Tronsportotion VIC 

MEDA /Montana Economic Developers Association 



Montana Histoncal Society 

Atontono League of Cities & Towns 

AAontono Lewis & Oark Bicentennial. Comm 

Montana Rural Development Partners 

Montana Recreotion tt Parks Associatiofl 

AAontona State University 

AAontono Tourism Coalition 

AAontona Tourism A Recreation Intiotive 

AAontona Tribal Tourism Allionce 

Non-profit organizations 

Notional Park Service 

AAontona Outfitter Licensing Board 

Resource, Conservation A Development 

AAontona Sov't/Agency/Dept/Commission 

Smoll Business Devlpmt Corporation 

State Trails Advisory Committee 

Tourism Advisory Council 

AAontona To«rism Regions (Countries) 

American Indian Tribes 

AAontona Universities A Colleges 

Visitor Information Center 



The AAontona Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 

is «vaJloble electronically at http://travelmontana.statc.mt.us. 

For more Informotion. contoct AAontona Deportment of Commerce, 

Promotion Division (Travel AAontono) of (406) 841-2870. 



Planning Team Contact: Lorraine Raoch. Pnncipd 

The Hingrton Reach 6roup. Inc. 90 Box 400. Srangevillc. ID 83930 

Tel: (206) 9832179. E-niail: lroach«thrgrtiup com 



ES-12 



ExECimvF. Summary 



MONTANA Tourism b Rfcrfatkin Stkatk;ic Pi an 2003-2007 



Strategic Plan will Guide Tourism Programming for 5 Years & Beyond 

Tourism and recreation in Montana stand at an historic moment. Decisions made - and 
actions taken - in the next five years will affect Montana's environment, its economy and its 
citizens for decades. Those decisions and actions must be strategic, and they must be consistent 
with the values and priorities of Montanans. As the state faces perhaps the largest tourism 
event in years - the Lewis & Clark Expedition Bicentennial - this Tourism and Recreation 
Strategic Plan will become the guide for all tourism and recreation leaders as they develop 
plans and programs for the Bicentennial years and beyond. There is much at stake. 

Strategic Plan Defines Role of Tourism in Montana's Overall Economy 

Tourism is Montana's second largest industry, generating $1.7 billion annually and 
making it an essential leg of Montana's economic stool. Tourism development strategies must 
be informed by - and integrated with - all of Montana's economic and natural assets (Figure 
1.1). Agriculture, ranching, mining, forestry, technology, manufacturing, construction and 
education are other legs of Montana's economic stool. Therefore, this Tourism and Recreation 
Strategic Plan was developed in the context of tourism's role in Montana's overall economic 
picture. Moreover, the Strategic Plan is not merely a set of goals and list of actions. It begins 
with a strategic framework - an overarching context for the recommended actions - and ends 
with quantifiable objectives that include ways to measure results. 

This is the third 5- Year Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan developed by the 
Department of Commerce as part of a long-term planning process that began in 1991. The first 
plan was completed in October 1992, following statewide research and outreach to private and 
public sectors via surveys and planning workshops. A vision statement was defined, twenty 
specific goals were grouped into four major goal areas, and actions were identified for each 
goal. Public and private sector organizations used the plan to guide tourism development and 
promotion policies, programs and activities. In 1996, the process continued with an update of 
the 1992 plan to cover the years 1998-2002. The 1998 update identified a vision statement, 
twenty-three goals grouped into five theme areas, sixty-two action areas, and organizations 
responsible for implementation of the action areas. An accompanying Action Booklet 
summarized the action areas by responsible organization. Midway through the five-year time 
period (November 2000), a mid-term report was prepared to evaluate progress on the action 



Chapter 1: 
Introduction 

♦ Project Context & 
Purpose 

♦ Planning Process 



The 2003-2007 Strategic Plan 
will guide tourism & recreation in 
Montana for 5 years 4 beyond. 
There is much at stake. 



Physical Assets 
(places, facilities, 
sites, attractions, 

infrastructure) 




Past* 
Current 
Tourism 
Trends 
(stote/nafl) 



Resources 

(organizations 

agencies, funding, 

tcch'l assistance) 



Socio-Economic 

Trends ^industry. 

population, 

employment) 



Services. 
Events A 
Activities 



State/Regional 
Programs A 
Promotion 



Fig. 1.1: Info-6athering Process 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 1: Introduction 



There is no shortage of opinions 
about tounsm in Montana. 



Strategic Plan Public Outrcoch Efforts 
included the Foilowing: 

• 8 public meetings (Kniispcll. Masoula. 6reat 
Falls. Billings. Miles City. Glasgow. Bozeman 
and Butte) 

• Meetings with industry ond stakeholder 
grot^ 

• Presentations to TAC, MTRI. rcgions/CVBs 
ond Governor's Conference on Tourism (in 
October 2001. and February. April. June 
and October 2002) 

• Online survey of rcprcscntatwes from 75 
stakeholder groups 

• Drcct commumcotton with stakeholder 
representat ivcs 

• Public comment period 




Fig. 1.2: Information Flow for 
Tourism Strategy 



areas identified in the strategic plan. The booklet indicated actions that had been completed or 
not completed, along with comments about each action. 

This 2003-2007 Strategic Plan builds on the work completed in the first two plans, and is 
designed to be action-oriented - to address "what, why, how, where, when, who and how to 
pay for it". To be implement-able, the Plan includes not just strategies and actions ("what" and 
"how"), but also priorities, timeline, resf)onsibility and resources to support implementation. It 
is not designed to sit on the shelf and gather dust - it is intended to be a dog-eared, page-worn 
implementation blueprint and reference tool for Montana's tourism and recreation 
stakeholders. It focuses on building teams to fully integrate tourism and recreation into 
Montana's overall economic development efforts. 

The Planning Process was Inclusive and Multi-Faceted 

This Strategic Plan contains many "fingerprints" - the ideas, concerns, input and 
wisdom of Montanans from many communities, sectors and organizations. Successful 
implementation will require the strategic cooperation and assistance of these partners. Stake- 
holders included private businesses, regional tourism organizations, chambers of commerce, 
convention & visitors bureaus, state and federal agencies, universities and colleges, tribes, 
heritage and cultural organizations, sportsmen's and conservation groups, and elected officials. 

There is no shortage of opinions about tourism in Montana. This Plan was developed 
based on the principles of community-based strategic planning, involving partners at all levels 
in a collaborative planning process. Therefore, Montana's Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 
was driven by local and regional grass-roots planning efforts and needs, which then were 
woven into statewide strategies and priorities. The Plan reflects local values and priorities 
regarding tourism development, potential impacts, long-term economic diversification and 
promotion. 

The planning team began by tapping the expertise and strategic insights of Department 
of Commerce staff. Tourism Advisory Council members, university, state and federal agency 
representatives, and statewide cultural, sportsmen's and conservation organizations. These 
individuals provided "big picture" perspective on statewide programs, priorities, trends, issues 
and political realities. The "big picture" information was used to inform discussions with local 
and regional groups through public outreach. Then the input from local and regional groups, 
in the context of the "big picture", was used to develop an integrated Strategic Plan (Figure 1.2). 



CHATTOil: Introduction 



Montana Tourism h Rf.crf.atk)n Stratfcic Plan 2003-2007 



A four-phase planning process was used to complete Montana's Tourism & Recreation 
Strategic Plan. The phases, steps and timeline are summarized below and in Table 1.1. 

I. Orientation and Information-Gathering 

A. Meetings with Client Team to clarify objectives, scope, outcomes, timeline 

B. Obtain state & regional planning documents, updates of data for 2000/2001 

II. Evaluate Current Conditions: Supply & Demand 

C. Evaluate Montana's tourism and recreation "product", or assets: infrastructure, 
facilities, events, attractions, promotion/communication system, resources, key issues, 
opportunities, impacts, challenges and threats 

D. Review research data about current travelers in Montana and trends from 1990-2001 

E. Review data about surrounding states, national/international trends. Department of 
Commerce (DOC)/Travel Montana (TM) programs and marketing efforts, markets, 
competition 

III. Engage Stakeholders in Development of Strategic Plan 

F. Solicit input about local/regional priorities and needs: 8 public meetings, online survey 
of stakeholders, meetings with industry /agency/tribal/nonprofit groups, presentations 
to Tourism Advisory Council (TAC), Montana Tourism & Recreation Initiative (MTRI) 
and Governor's Conference, public comment period 

IV. Develop Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 



Strategic Plan Focuses on Supply 

& Demand. Ways to Address 

Challenges A Opportunities 

♦ Executive Summary 

♦ Chapter 1: Introduction 

♦ Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 

♦ Chapter 3: Markets 

♦ Chapter 4: The Strategy 

♦ Chapters: Objectives A 
Actions 

♦ Chapter 6: Implementation A 
Action Table 

♦ Appendices: Resources, 
Reference Materials, etc. 



G. Develop draft vision, guiding 
principles, strategic framework, 
goals & objectives, evaluation 
methods; present to TAC, 
stakeholder groups 

H. Based on input, develop draft 
Strategic Plan; distribute for 
public comment 

I. Refine and complete final 

Tourism & Recreation Strategic 
Plan for 2003-2007 



Table 1.1: Strategic Planning Process Steps A Timeline, 2001-2002 

PionnlnQ Element Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mor Apr AAoy Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct 

Meet w/ DOC/TAA Team, TAC, MTRI ■ 

8 Public Meetings ■ ■ 

Information-Gathering ■■■■■■■■ 

MIKA, MOSA Conferences ■ ■ 

Draft Vision/Framework/Soals ■ ■ 

Meet w/ TAC, MTRI; Refine ■ ■ 

Online Survey/ Comments, Refine ■ ■ ■ 

MTRI Meeting, SOV's Conf ; Feedback ■ ■ 

Develop Draft Plan Actions/Elements ■ ■ 

Meet with TAC, MTRI ■ 

Write Draft Plan, Client Input, Refine ■ ■ ■ ■ 

Public Comments, Refine ■ 

TAC Meeting, Adopt Final Plan ■ 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 1: Introduction 



(This page deliberately left blank.) 



ChapterI: Introduction 



Montana Tourism & Rrcreatkin Strathiic Pi an 2003-2007 



To plan for the future, first we must understand the past and present. This chapter 
provides an overview of existing conditions related to tourism and recreation in Montana. It 
begins with a "big picture" summary of statewide socio-economic trends. It discusses tourism's 
role in Montana's economy, including statewide and regional tourism/recreation trends over 
the past decade. It then outlines the natural and man-made assets that support tourism and 
recreation, as well as the challenges and threats facing Montana's tourism and recreation 
industry, in the context of the changing economy, environment, and political climate. 

A. Statewide Socio-Economic Trends 

Montana is the fourth largest state in the U.S., encompassing 145,552 square miles, and is 
home to only 902,000 citizens, or 6.2 people per square mile (2000 Census). Yet Montanans 
hosted nearly 9.5 million nonresident visitors in 2001. Those nonresidents spent $1.7 billion in 
Montana, helping to make tourism and recreation the state's second largest industry. 

A.l Montana is Growing & Changing, Quality Job Opportunities are Needed 

From 1990 to 2000, Montana's population grew from 799,065 to 902,195, up 13%, and is 
projected to top 1,000,000 by 2010. However, some areas of the state grew at a much higher 
rate, while others actually lost population. Montana's population is aging, and is the fourth 
oldest of any state in the U.S., with a median age of 37.8 in 2000 (up from 33.8 in 1990). There 
are two factors that may be contributing to this trend: retirees moving to Montana, and a 
smaller proportion of people age 25-34, as Montana loses young adults after college due to lack 
of job opportunities. 

Although the total number of households grew by 17% over the past decade, family 
households increased by only 12%, while non-family households (unrelated people living 
together) increased by 28%. Family size decreased by about 3% to 2.45 people per household. 
Housing units grew along with the population, increasing by 51,478 units, or 14%. The number 
of vacation/occasional use homes and condominiums rose by 3,732 units, or 18%, indicating a 
significant increase in the number of residents and nonresidents with second homes in 
Montana. These nonresidents are part-time residents, as well as visitors, within and to the state. 

Montanans' per capita income rose by 53% from 1989 to 1999 to $17,151, but it was still 
58% below the U.S. average of $29,469. The state's median household income in 1999 was 
$33,024. The average annual wage (all industries) in 1999 was $23,253, which was 50"^ in the 



Chapter 2: 

Existing 

Conditions 

A. Statewide Socio- 
Economic Trends 

B. Tourism Trends 

C. Tourism and Recreation 
Assets & Opportunities 

D. Challenges & Threats to 
Tourism and Recreation 



'The great thing in this world is not 
so much where we are, but in what 
direction we are moving. ' 

- Oliver Wendell Holmes 



Per Capita Income ■ 
of Montanons 1 


Montana 
1989 
1999 
% Change 


$11,213 

$17,151 

53% 


U.S. 

1999 $29,469 
Difference -58% 
(MT vs. U.S.) 





Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



Fig. 2.1: Full-Time A Port-Time 
Employment, 2000 



Ag Santcn. 

QmIGm Fo««»y. R»Wng 4 FwmEimngt 

1% 
TCPU 

9% 




Contkudon 

6% 






nation; however, the average male working full-time, year-round in 1999 made $30,503, while 
the average female working full-time, year-round made $20,914. About 16% of Montanans live 
in poverty (33% of families with a female head of household live in poverty). Montana leads 
the nation in the number of multiple job-holders, which puts significant stress on families. 
Nearly 90% of Montanans age 25+ have at least a high school diploma, compared to the national 
average of about 82%, but only 24% of Montanans have a bachelors degree or higher (U.S. 
average is 25%). 

A.2 Highest Growth is in Lower-Wage Sectors 

From 1990 to 1999, the number of jobs in Montana rose 24%, from 370,000 jobs to 
460,000 jobs. However, the highest growth was in the lowest paying sectors of retail and 
services - the categories that include tourism and recreation. Nonresident traveler 
expenditures in Montana accounted for about $366 million in employee compensation in 
2000, according to University of Montana research. Montana's traditional industries of 
agriculture and mining have declined (see Figure 2.3, next page). The statewide 
unemployment rate in 2001 was 4.6%; however, some counties had unemployment in the 
double digits. 



Fig. 2.2: ?trsw)tA Income 4 
Earnings by Industry. 2000 





Ag S«nKM. 
FoTMtry r»hng 


9%. 




kOhm 


irH 




OMtGo* 


1% 


MntnQ 


Conskucftofi 


EnlMprtMt 




n,/ 


8% 


23% 


M~; 


r- ^ 


MvH/fKkfftn^ 


TCPU ^ 


» Y- 


tf^^ 


■^ "* 


•» \1 


^2. 


^^ 


i 


6% 

MMTm* tMwttMitTndt 


W 

Sm*m 
27% 


1» S% 







Figures 2.1 and 2.2 at left show the ratio of income/earnings compared to the 
number of jobs by industry sector in 2000. The sectors that produced a higher percentage 
of income than the number of jobs they contributed are Government (+6.4% earnings over 
number of jobs). Transportation & Public Utilities (+3.1%), Manufacturing (+2.0%), 
Construction (+1.3%), Wholesale Trade (+1.2%) and Mining (+1.1%). The sectors that had 
a lower ratio of earnings compared to the number of jobs created were the following: 
Retail Trade (-7.2%), Services (-3.4%), Farms (-2.9%), Finance/Insurance/Real Estate (-.8%) 
and Ag Services/Forestry /Fishing (-.7%). It is interesting to note that "Tourism" is not 
listed as a distinct industry in reported economic data. 

The Montana Governor's Framework for Economic Development (2002) states, "Gross 
State Product (GSP) is the broadest measure of the economy. It is the value of goods and 
services produced by a state. Montana's GSP was estimated at $19.8 billion in 1998, 
ranking Montana 49*'' in the nation in per capita GSP. Montana's real dollar GSP from 
1986 to 1999 expanded by only 35%. During the past five years our annual rate of growth 
of 1.2% was the 5'*' slowest GSP growth rate in the nation." 



Chapter 2: Exbtinc, CoNomoNS 



Montana Tourjsm & Rectif atkw Strattcic Pi-an 2009-2007 



Figure 2.3 shows how the value of goods and services produced in 
Montana changed from 1990 to 1999. Note that Construction had the 
highest growth rate, followed by Services, Finance/Insurance/Real Estate 
(FIRE), Wholesale and Retail Trade. The value of Manufactured Goods 
rose by only 41%, and Transportation/Communications/Public Utilities 
(TCPU) by 34%. Meanwhile, Mining and Agriculture declined. 

Tourism and recreation are part of the Services sector - the second 
highest growth sector. Tourism also has driven revenues to the 
Construction sector (building of hotels, resorts, vacation homes, 
restaurants, retail stores). Nonresident tourists spent an estimated $1.2 
billion on retail goods alone (including retail sales, restaurant and 
beverage, gas and groceries) in 2000, which was 12% of statewide retail 
goods sales of $10 billion. Weak growth in traditional industry sectors 
means that tourism plays an increasingly important role in Montana's economy 



Fig. 2.3: Montana Industry Sector Trends 1990-1999 
(Change in Value of Goods A Services Produced) 



139 3% 




'•vv 



vv^'^^.d?'^ c}s^^ 



A.3 Small Businesses Need Effective Support System to be Competitive 

Montana's business sector consists mainly of small, family-owned businesses. More 
than half (54%) of businesses in 2000 had fewer than five employees. Nearly two-thirds had 
fewer than ten employees, and only 4% had 50 or more employees. Of the state's 48 largest 
private sector employers, 75% are service sector businesses (health care, retail, banking, 
business support services and hotel/restaurant), and only 25% are manufacturing, agriculture, 
construction and utilities businesses (see sidebar at right). 

Many of Montana's small businesses are vulnerable to competition from out-of-state 
corporations and national chains that are moving to Montana. The tourism and recreation 
sector is no exception ~ it is particularly dominated by small businesses. Most of these family- 
owned businesses are not linked to support services and training provided by large 
corporations and national franchises. If Montana wants to maintain its local character and 
family-owned businesses, it must have an effective system to provide technical assistance, 
capital, and timely information to current and potential business owners about state/national 
markets and trends. Professional development and business training are essential to help 
ensure that Montana-based companies are competitive. 



^\^-- 



^N^^°^ ^« 



.*t.c^^ 



"For the first hundred years of its 
history, Montana was a Company Town. ' 
We have not yet built a strong 
entrepreneurial legacy in this state. ' 
- Local Montana Economic Develp't Director 



Two-Thirds of Montana Businesses 
have Fewer thon 10 Employees* 

Of Montana's 48 largest private 
sector employers, 15 are health care, 10 
are retailers, 7 arz manufacturers, 5 orz. 
business support services, 3 are banks, 3 
are hotel/restaurant groups, 3 are 
utilities, 1 is an agricultural cooperative 
and 1 is a construction firm. 

* Businesses with payroll. Excludes railroad, 
self-employed, most agricultural employment. 
Source: MT Dept. of Labor A Industry, 2001 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



Tourism Trends 



B.1 Nonresident Visitation Grew 46% from 1990-2000; Seasonality is a Challenge 

For the purposes of this document, the terms "visitor" and "tourist" are interchangeable, 
and refer to both residents and nonresidents who travel for leisure or business purposes, taking 
money the\' earned in one place, and spending it elsewhere. The number of nonresidents 
visiting Montana rose 46% from 1990 to 2000 (Figure 2.4), compared to 85% growth in lodging 
sales (Figure 13). However, the number of summer visitors declined from 19% to 2001. 



Fif 2.4: fJu fS i d w it Visitars 1990-2000 




nm mi im im3 in* ins !«w 1997 19« 1999 2000 



'Teta lo rat-im ■• 



Fig. Z3. Lodgmg Sales Trends 





Statewide Lodg in g Sales & Room Rates 

Statewide lodging sales grew approximately 85% from 1990 to 2O00 (Figure 
25). However, when viewed in real dollars, the growth was 41% (adjusted for 
inflation, based on tfie Consumer Price Index, or CPl). Therefore, half of the growth 
in revenue (44%) was due to inflation - price increases - rather than growth in 
\olume (number of customers). 

According to Smith Travel Research, average hotel room prices in Montana 
rose from $40 p»er night to about $58 per night from 1991 to 2001 - an increase of $18 
per night, or 44% (see Figure 2.6 next page). If room rates had increased consistent 
\\ith CPl inflation rate, the increase would have been only $4.26 per night or 1 1%^ 
from $40 to about $44. Therefore, the growth in real terms exceeded the rate of 
inflation by 33%, or $13.74 per night (an increase of 34%). However, this growth is 
not consistent statewide: room rates have increased significantly in resort and 
urban areas - especially in peak season - but they have grown more slowly in rural 
areas and shoulder seasons. 

CXxupanc>- & Seasonality 

Figure 2.7 shows the average monthly hotel occupancy in Montana during 
2001, compared to the overall occupancy of the Mountain Region (MT, ID, WY, CO, 
UT, NV, AZ, NM). While Montana hotels run at an average of 75*-% occupancy in 
peak tourist season (July-September), occupancy rates drop to 50% or lower for six 
months of the year - which is below break-even point for most hotel businesses. 
This trend dtows that the su pply of hotel rooms exceeds demand (on a year-round 
basis). AldKHjgh this is consistent %vith national trends, and advantageous for 
consumers, it is unprofitable for the hotel industry. 



CHAmt2: ExcnNcCoNomoNS 



Montana TouoBM li RKKAnoN Snunoc Plan 2 



$70 
$60 
$50 
$40 
$30 
$20 
$10 
$0 



In 2001, Montana's hotel occupancy was two percentage points below 
the Mountain Region average (Figure 2.7). However, Montana's seasonality 
was much more dramatic: peak season occupancies in Montana were higher, 
but off-peak times dipped much lower. This fluctuation creates instability in 
the industry, resulting in many seasonal/temporary jobs, high turnover, and 
low-wage jobs with few benefits. 

Figure 2.8 compares lodging tax collections by season (business 
quarters, as reported by the Montana Department of Revenue). There is great 
disparity not only in the amount of lodging sales from season to season, but in j^ 

the rate of growth over the past decade: 1*' quarter (Jan-Mar) grew 94%, 2"*^ 
quarter (Apr-Jun) grew 83%, 3"^ quarter (Jul-Sep) grew 87%, and 4"" quarter 
(Oct-Dec) grew 74% (figures unadjusted for inflation). 

The seasonality of tourism in Montana affects sales in many business 
sectors besides lodging: restaurant, retail, wholesale, grocery, banking, auto, etc. It also 
impacts labor markets: temporary and seasonal jobs create instability in families and 
communities, increase costs of employee training and unemployment insurance, and create 
employee housing challenges. Seasonality also increases transportation costs: airlines and 
rental car companies determine flight schedules, inventory of aircraft/cars and prices based on 
demand. Low demand in off-peak times increases costs in peak season to make up the 
difference. Clearly, additional tourism revenue is needed in off-peak months in order to 
provide stability and sustainability in tourism and recreation businesses, and higher-wage jobs. 



Fig. 2.6: Average Room Rate, 1991-2001 




^— 'Avg Room Rate M Inflation-Acljusted I 
Source: Smith Travel Research 



Fig. 2.7: Hotel Occupancy, 2001 



Fig. 2.8: Lodging Tax Collections by Quarter - Statewide 




/^«^ ^ ¥^ ^ ^ ^ v^^ c^^<^ 



-Hotel Occupancy Rates. Mountain Region 
-l-lotel Occupancy Rates. Montana 



$5,000,000 
$4,500,000 
$4,000,000 
$3,500,000 
$3,000,000 
$2,500,000 
$2,000,000 
$1 .500.000 
$1,000,000 
$500,000 
$0 




Source: Smith Travel Research 



1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 

k-lstOtr ^l»-4th Qtr 1 



-3rdQtr 



-2nd Qtr 



Montana Tourism & RiiCKEAiiON Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



B.2 Growth & Trends Vary by Tourism Region 



Fig. 2.9: Lodging Tax Collections by Region 




Table 2.1: 


1990-2000 Regional Lodg 
Growth by Quarter 


ng Revenue 


"iwoo 


rotr 


Z-'Qtr 


3"*Otr 


4'*'Qtr Overall 


eiocicr 


64i 


90% 


80% 85% 


Gold West 


OjO 


66% 


68% 


65% 68% 


Russell 


Qt^ 


34% 


32% 


26% 32% 


Yellowstone 


cn^ 


145% 


1JZ% 


129% 150% 


Missouri River 


31% 


32% 


(5%) 


42% 38% 


Custer 


64% 


66% 


71% 


(72%) 69% 



Montana's six tourism regions each have their own unique character and assets. They 
also experienced dramatic differences in tourism development and visitation over the past 
decade. Figure 2.9 at left summarizes the growth in lodging tax collections for each region from 
1990 to 2000. As mentioned earlier, the overall lodging sales growth statewide was 85%, but 
growth rates differed significantly by region: 

" Yellowstone Country: 150% 

• Glacier Country: 85% 

■ Custer Country: 69% 

■ Gold West Country: 68% 

• Missouri River Country: 38% 

• Russell Country: 32% 

Table 2.1 shows quarterly lodging sales trends for each of the six 
tourism regions. Note the quarters of highest growth rates (circled). 

In Glacier Country, communities reported declines in Summer 
visitation due to a 28% drop in visitors at Glacier National Park (down by 
525,000 from 1992-2001). However, lodging revenues grew by 90% in 3"* 
quarter region-wide (July-Sept.), and 2~* quarter growth was 92%, while 1" 
quarter revenues grew by only 64%. Heritage and culture travelers are a 
growing segment of the visitor market. In the Flathead Valley area, Canadian 
visitation has declined, but business travel has increased. Much of the lodging 
revenue growth there has been room rate increases. The Missoula area has 
experienced significant commercial development in the last decade, attracting 
business travelers, destination shoppers and conferences (especially trade 
association groups). The success of the University of Montana Grizzly football 
team has accelerated fall visitation. The Bitterroot Valley reported a decline in 
visitors and hunters in 2000 because of the wildfires. However, increased 
visitation generated by interest in Lewis and Clark is reversing the decline. 

In Gold West Country, heritage and cultural travelers are an 
important segment, frequenting the region's outstanding heritage assets 
(Uptown Butte, the Montana Historical Society, Lewis & Clark sites, and 
Helena's Summer Symphony). The World Museum of Mining reported a 



2000 



10 



OlAPTfR 2: EXBTINC CONDmONS 



Montana Tourlsm & Recreation SreATwac Plan 20Q3-2007 



Gold West Country 




1100 000 ~ 



'68% growth overall: 71% Q1 , 66% 02, 68% 03. 65% 04 



decline in 2000-2001, likely due to many fires in the region. Regionally, the highest growth was 
in 1" quarter (71%), followed by 3^'' quarter (68%). 

In Russell Country, tourism providers report that historical/cultural travelers are 
increasing as a percent of all visitors, especially those following the Lewis & Clark Trail. 
Additionally, river trips on the wild & scenic section of the Missouri River are increasing. 
Russell Country is the only region where 3"" quarter does not generate the most lodging 
revenue - the peak time is 4"^ quarter, primarily 
because of hunting. The highest growth quarter 
from 1990-2000 was 1*' quarter, followed by 2"*^ 
quarter and then S''' quarter. Local providers 
report that meetings and conferences are 
responsible for part of the growth. According to 
2000-01 University of Montana Winter study. 



Interstate 15 between Canada and Great Falls 
receives about 9-10% of all statewide 
nonresident traffic in winter. This may be due 
in part to sports travelers attending semi-pro 
hockey games in Great Falls and Canada. 

In Yellowstone Country, communities 
reported declines in summer visitors due to 
falling visitation at Yellowstone Park. However, 
region-wide lodging revenues grew by 137% in 
3"* quarter (Jul-Sep), despite a slight decline in 
2000 due to fires. Much of the revenue growth is 
price increases; however, sales indicate that 
volume has grown as well. Local 
representatives also reported that international 
visitation was down, likely due to unfavorable 
exchange rates for Europeans and Canadians 
(consistent with national trends). Yellowstone 
Country's highest growth was in 1*' quarter, 
with the Big Sky Resort area typically providing 
nearly half of lodging tax collections. 



Fig. 2.10: Quarterly Lodging Trends by Region 



siraocK 
iiaooQoc 
li«oax 
ii2aoa£ 
sioooQo: 
laxctt) 
seoooco 

14010)0 

ixoon 

K 



Slacicr Country 



5^-0— ■'V~~^ 



■ ■ ■ 



'85% growtti ovarall; 64% 0, 90% 03, 92% 02, 80% 04 
Russell Country 



$1 200.000 
S1.000.000 
$800,000 
S600.000 
(400 000 
S200.000 

so 



- - ^ . ^ " " . 

■ii 



1990 1981 1982 1993 1994 t99S 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 



'32% growth overall: 37% 01, 34% 02, 32% 03, 26% 04 

l-*-Ql -• 



yeljowstone Country 




tmt ins ISM •«•; 



'150% growth overal 191% 01. 145% 02. 137% 03, 129% 04 
Missouri River Country 




*38% growth overall 44% 03. 42% 04. 32% 02. 31% 01 
Custer Country 




•02 



08 



'69% growth overall: 72% 04, 71% 03. 66% 02. 64% 01 

-Q4| 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



11 



Summory of Regional Trends 

A look at regional trends around the 
state indicates the following: 

• Off-peak seasons hod higher 
growth in lodging revenues than did 
summer (Q3) m all regions but 
Missouri River Country 

• Heritage/cultural travel is 
increasing, esp. related to Lewis A 
Clark. Indion culture 

• Notional Pork visitation is down, as 
is visitation at many other major 
attractions 

• Commercial travel (meetings, 
conventions) is increosing 

• There arz increasing concerns 
obout impocts from tourists on 
residents and/or natural resources 

IP specific locations 

w.iy".:;:...-. ■.■ -i' "ii'i I.-. .aaasir.^ 






Fig. 2.11: Visitation Trends at Key Destinations d 
Traffic Trends at Key Gateways, 1995-2001 




Snowmobiling in the Park is an important component of the region's winter recreation 
opportunities. With uncertainty of future snowmobile access there, tourism providers seek to 
develop more diversified winter recreation products and services. 

Missouri River Country was the only region whose highest growth was in 3^ quarter. 
Both Fort Peck Lake and the CM. Russell National Wildlife Refuge reported significant 
increases in visitation, likely due to fishing. Ft. Peck Reservoir visitation increased 24% from 
1992 to 2001, while the CM. Russell Wildlife Refuge visitation rose 136% from 1998 to 2001. 
The Fort Peck Dam Interpretive Center and Museum near Glasgow, which will open in 2003, is 
anticipated to be a major regional draw. Interestingly, Ft. Union Trading Post, just across the 
border in North Dakota, was down 27% from 1993 to 2001. Communities and tribes in Missouri 
River Country are preparing for the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial. 

In Custer Country, commercial travel is significant business, especially the convention 
and meeting market, since Billings is Montana's largest city. Heritage/cultural travelers also are 
an important segment, attracted by the Little Big Horn Battlefield and Lewis & Clark sites along 
the Yellowstone River, such as Pompeys Pillar. Billings also reports significant numbers of 
destination shoppers from Wyoming, and it is a major hub for visitation related to medical 
services. However, hotel occupancies in Billings did not increase significantly from 1998-2001, 
despite growth in overall revenues. This is likely because higher revenues reflect price 
increases, and visitors are dispersed among more hotel properties, so occupancies did not rise 
commensurate with revenues. Custer Country's highest growth from 1990- 
2000 was in the 4"' quarter, perhaps due to increased business travel, 
Christmas shoppers and sportsmen. 



B.3 Visitation at Key Attractions Declined from 1995-2001 

A closer look at visitation for specific sites reveals a mixture of 
growth and decline around the state. Figure 2.11 shows 1995-2001 visitation 
trends at fifteen major destinations, and at thirteen key highway entrance 
points to the state. All of the highway entrances experienced rising traffic 
counts except U.S. 89 at Yellowstone Park, and 1-15 at the Idaho border. 

For the most part, destinations with water recreation appeal saw 
increasing visitation (Upper Missouri, Big Hole and Upper Madison Rivers, 
Fort Peck Lake). Other sites ref>orting increases were Pompeys Pillar, Giant 



CMAFTT.R 2: EXISTINC CoNomoNS 



McwTANA Tourism it Rkctikatkwj Strath;ic Pi an 2003-2007 



Springs State Park and the CM. Russell National Wildlife Refuge. Note: agencies indicated that 
some increases may be attributable to improvements in methodology used to count visitors. 
Figure 2.12 compares visitation at major destinations in 1999. 

Conversely, several major destinations reported declines in visitation, most notably 
Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks. Fev^er tourists stopped at the battlefields (Little 
Bighorn, Big Hole), Grant Kohrs Ranch, the National Bison Range and Lewis & Clark National 
Interpretive Center. These trends are surprising, since statewide visitor counts, lodging sales 
and traffic counts all increased. Visitation downturns in 2000-2001 are partially attributable to 
wildfires and high gasoline prices, but most sites experienced declining numbers from 1995-99. 
These findings raise the question: 

If overall visitation increased, but visitation at key attractions declined, 
where are the visitors going, and what are they doing? 

To investigate the answer, the planning team reviewed seasonal lodging sales trends at 
the regional level. State park/fishing access site visitation trends, hunting and fishing license 
sales and skiing trends. They also interviewed local and regional tourism representatives and 
destination site managers, and reviewed the findings of several research reports on nonresident 
travelers in Montana (see Chapter 3, Markets). 



B.4 Most State Park Visitors are Residents 

As Figure 2.12 at right shows. Glacier National Park 
attracts four times the visitation of any other site except 
Yellowstone Park. Seven of the ten sites listed are managed 
by federal agencies (Park Service, US Forest Service, Bureau 
of Reclamation, Corps of Engineers, US Fish & Wildlife). 
Only one of the ten sites is a Montana State Park. 

Figure 2.13 (next page) compares visitation at all 
Montana State Parks with visitation at Glacier and 
Yellowstone National Parks from 1995-2000. State Park 
visitation did not increase significantly over this time period 
(although it did not decrease like the national parks and 
many other sites). Residents are using their state parks more, 
while nonresidents comprise a smaller share of state parks 



State and regional visitor trends 
raise the following question: 

'If overall visitation increased, 
but visitation at key attractions 
declined, where are the visitors 
going, and what are they dairy?' 









Fig. 


2.12: 


Visitation at Major Destinations, 1999 


IMOOOOV 






1,600.000- ' 




1,400 000- ' 




1.200,000-' 




1.000 000- ' 




000,000 - ' 




600 000- ' 




400 000- ' 




r\ 


n 


200 000- ' 
0- < 


L 


l^ ~I^JT^jT^jT^jT^^-V^-iJ 



Gtactcr NP LiMe BMhofn 
BatOtfttM 



Lake 



B^horn Nabonsl B«onF)*0i«*d Lsk* Ctarh Cwtyon Mbscumol La 
Canyon Rvtff* SP flMCfvcw t»« ftocttM I 

NMonalRvc 

Area 



• ■AOafk Ma maw 

Socwty 



NOTE: Yellowstone Notional Park, which attracts nearly 3 million visitors per year, 
is not included because it is primarily in Wyoming, and it is not possible to determine 
the number of those visitors who travel in Montana. Source: ITRR, Univ. of Montana 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2CX)7 



Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 



13 



pig. 2.13: State/National Pork Visitation Comporison 



t»«4 i«t« ttf? IttI IttI 3000 



I • MT»m»»»r«t ■ OwcmNP * 



vancariiaiK nr 



Fig. 2.14: Stote Pork Visitors 1992-2000 




1992 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 
|a%MT Residents ■ % Non-MT Residents I 



visitors (Figure 2.14). In 1988, state parks reported that visitation was about half 
residents, and half nonresidents. In 2000, nearly three quarters (72%) of state 
parks visitors were Montanans, while only 28% were nonresidents. 

While overall state park visitation was flat, state fishing access sites 
(FAS) saw increases of 30%, representing an additional 1.1 million visitors to 
fishing access sites from 1996-2000 (Figure 2.15). Meanwhile, visits to national 
wildlife refuges in Montana increased by 44% from 1996-2001, according to the 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). 

The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) estimates that 
stale parks create approximately 1,500 private sector jobs and $16.5 million in 
direct income for residents of nearby communities. Nonresident expenditures 
adjacent to parks are estimated at $45 million (FWP, May 2001). 

FWP and USFWS staff believe that some of the increased visitation may 
be the result of sportsmen who are moving to public lands to hunt and fish 
because of closures on private lands. Increased Summer visitation to state 
parks, fishing access sites, and refuges may partially account for downward 
visitation trends at national parks and other sites, as Montana residents seek 
recreational opportunities that are less crowded, and less expensive than 
national parks. 

Fig. 2.15: State Park A Fishing Access Site 
Visitation Estimates, 1991-2000 




1991 1992 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 



■ Coirbined FAS/F^rh 



■ FAS Vsdatnn 



14 



Chaptkr 2: Existing CoNi>moNS 



Montana Tourism & Rfc-rs ation Strati=x;k: Pu^n 2003-2007 



B.5 Winter Travel is Up, But Recreation Trends are Mixed 

First quarter (Jan-Mar) had the highest rate of growth in lodging revenues of 
any quarter from 1990-2000. Total winter nonresident visitation increased by 
518,400 (37%) from 1998-2001. However, skiing trends in Montana can be described 
as "variable" over the past decade. Of the destination ski areas. Big Sky and Bridger 
near Bozeman saw the most growth. Big Mountain at Whitefish and Red Lodge 
south of Billings had some good snow years, but relatively little growth overall. 

Nationally, skier visits increased in the 2000-2001 season after a decade of 
decline. This was due to several factors: early, heavy snowfall, deeply discounted 
season passes, continued growth in snowboarding (22% of Rocky Mountain Region 
visits), and development. As with other major destinations, resort owners in 
Montana are looking to real estate development for significant revenue growth, in 
addition to increases in skier visits. 

Regional ski areas experienced mixed growth. Local ski areas held their 
own, but were most vulnerable to weather conditions, due to generally lower 
elevations and lack of snow-making capability. 

Resident snowmobiling has grown about 65% over the past decade, based 
on snowmobile registrations, which increased by 8,000 from 1990-2000. Some of the 
increase included rental machines and previously unregistered machines, but 
overall resident use is up. Nonresident snowmobiling appeared to decline 
statewide from 19% of visitors participating (267,007) in 1998 to 6% of visitors 
participating in 2001 (115,422), according to ITRR Winter 2001 research. However, 
the number of snowmobilers in Yellowstone Park increased by 14% during the same 
time period, according to the National Park Service. 

Montana's winter recreation product continues to diversify with expanded 
indoor, as well as outdoor, activities. In addition to skiing and snowmobiling, 
outdoor recreation includes Winterfests, train rides, ice carnivals, competitions, ice 
fishing and boating. Residents and visitors alike enjoy winter shopping, trade and 
gun shows, museums, expositions, rodeos, symphony and theater productions, 
holiday festivals, bazaars, light shows and parades. Shopping is the most 
frequently mentioned indoor winter activity for nonresident visitors, according to 
ITRR studies. 



Fig. 2.16: Montana Ski Area Trends 
Destination Ski Area Visits 




1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 

Source: US Forest Service 
-a— Big Mn » Big Sky > Bndger ^ Red Lodge I 



70000 



Regional Ski Area Visits 




1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1996 1999 2000 

-LodTrMt i 



•Snowbowl 
Lookout 



•Showdown B Diicovery 
-Blacktail 



Local Ski Area Visits 




1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 
[-•-Marshal-*— Maverick— *-T»«oo Pa«» t Turner Ml | 

"Destination" ski areas are defined as lOOk* skier visits; 
'Regional" ski areas ore defined as 20k-70k skier visits; 
'Local" ski areas are defined as <20k skier visits. 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



15 



Fig. 2.17: iig Gomt Resident License Soles Trends 




-m Rm Con»«r«atan (Gan) 

■ Rm 0««f A 
• RaaElk 
•Ra* 0«*r B An««rtMB \M>rtatBil. Singto Region 

■ Ra* Spo«l>man's (wto baar) j 
-RaaSpoftiman'tOncI baar) 



Ftg. 2.18: Resident & Nonresident Hunting Licenses Sold 
700.000 

» » » 



800.000 
500.000 

400 000 
300.000 
200.000 
100.000 




s*' s*'' .*'' s^ 



Residenl ■ 



■ Nonresident I 



Fig. 2.19: Nonresident Big Game & Deer Combo Licenses 
nooo Y" 

14 MO 




B.6 Hunter Numbers are Declining; Fishing Continues to Increase 

To Montanans, fishing and hunting is a birthright - a part of their 
heritage - and a significant benefit to being a Montana resident. In fact, 
Montana is famous nationally and internationally for its fishing and big game 
hunting. Feature films like A River Runs Through It and The Horse Whisperer 
highlighted Montana's fish and wildlife assets, and attracted celebrities who 
purchased land in Montana. However, notoriety has created some controversy. 

Downturns in agriculture and ranching have forced property owners to 
seek alternative sources of revenue from their land. Leases of fishing and 
hunting rights to outfitters and sportsmen's clubs is a viable economic 
diversification strategy for farmers and ranchers. However, the result is closure 
of private lands to other sportsmen, decreasing access to hunting and fishing 
areas, especially for Montana residents who traditionally have been allowed to 
hunt or fish on their neighbor's property. 

Hunting 

The planning team received many comments expressing concern about 
sportsmen's opportunities in Montana. Often, the comments implied that the 
number of sportsmen has increased substantially, yet the actual license sales 
figures tell a different story. Sales of big game licenses to Montana residents 
have declined in nearly every category since 1996 (Figure 2.17), and overall sales 
have declined 14%. 

The number of all hunting licenses sold to nonresidents is less than half 
the number sold to residents, and has increased only 10% over the past decade 
(Figure 2.18). Sales of big game and deer combo licenses to nonresidents are 
capped at a five-year average of 23,600 per year, but have not reached even that 
level since 1997 (Figure 2.19). In some parts of eastern Montana, bird and big 
game hunting has grown significantly in national wildlife refuges. This may be 
a result of reductions in hunting access elsewhere in the state, along with 
increasing numbers of hunters from North Dakota and Wyoming. License sales 
affect federal funding to each state: the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration 
program, administered by the USFWS, apportions funds based in part on the 
number of paid hunting license holders. 



16 



CHAPreR 2: ExiSHNCCONDmONS 



Montana T(XJRI.sm k Rfcreatktn SrnATiiCK.- Pi an 2003-2007 



According to FWP and the International Travel & Tourism Research Assn. (TTRA): 

■ Hunting license numbers have fallen significantly across North America in the 1980's and 
1990's, and the activity has come under increasing attack by anti-hunting groups. (TTRA) 

• If the downward trend of resident license sales continues, local support for hunting may 
abate to the point that it is no longer perceived to be "for food or wildlife management," but 
solely for economic and tourism reasons. (FWP) 

Currently, hunting is an important economic activity and sport in Montana; largely in 
rural and economically depressed regions of the state. However, as new forms of 
special interest tourism have developed and continue to expand, more traditional 
recreation activities, such as hunting, have declined. 

Fishing 

Since 1990, resident fishing license sales have increased by about 6%, while 
nonresident sales increased by 19% (Figure 2.20). Many of these nonresident fishermen 
are "incidental" rather than "destination" fishermen: they may fish only a day or two, 
while residents may fish many days in a season. However, in drought years, certain 
areas of the state experience significant pressure as fishermen gravitate to a few 
drainages. The increase in nonresident fishing has contributed to growing concern 
about protecting Montanans' traditional fishing experiences versus promoting fishing 
to nonresidents. 



Tabic 2.2: Sportsmen Spending j 


in Montana, 


2000 


Anglers 


$222 million 


Elk hunters 


$ 83 million 


Deer hunters 


$ 74 million 


Antelope hunters 


$ 10 million 


Bear hunters 


$ 4 million 



Fig. 2.20: Resident vs. Nonresident 
Fishing Licenses 



260,000 
250,000 
240,000 
230.000 
220,000 
210,000 
200,000 
190,000 
180,000 
170,000 
160.000 




Economic Impact of Hunting & Fishing (Source: Montana FWP) 

Sportsmen in Montana spent substantial dollars in 2000 on transportation, food, 
lodging, guide fees and other items (Table 2.2). The average non-guided, nonresident hunter 
has an economic impact of $1,600 per trip to Montana, while a guided hunter has a $3,800 
impact (total of $200 million in 2000). In general, the top states of origin of guided hunters are 
Pennsylvania, California, Washington, Texas and the mid-west (MI, WI, MN), while the top 
states of origin of do-it-yourself hunters are Washington, California, Minnesota, Wisconsin, 
Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Dakota, and Oregon. 

Nonresidents support a significant share of Montana's fish and game management 
efforts: two-thirds of all fiscal year 2000 hunting/fishing license revenue to FWP came from 
nonresidents. Additionally, 43% of the entire FWP Department's total 2001 revenue came from 
nonresident hunting/fishing license sales. So, if the number of nonresident sportsmen declines, 
the FWP budget will decline, or resident sportsmen will have to make up the loss in revenue. 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ s# ^ s* N* N* ^ 



• Nonres FishgLic 



■Resident Fshg Lie 



Impact of Nonresident Hunters 

Guided $3,800/trip 

Non-guided $l,600/trip 

(Source: FWP) 



43% of the entire FWP Department 
budget came from nonresident 
hunting/fishing license sales in 2001. 
(Source; FWP) 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



17 



C Tourism & Recreation Assets and Opportunities 



pig. 2.21: Land Ownership in Montana 




61% of Montana land is privately owned. 
39% is owned by public agencies & tribes. 
Source KRIS 



Fig. 2.22: Land Ownership Map 




1 







Tourism and recreation assets can be divided in four general categories: 
attractions, activities, events and support systems. Because of its vast land base, many 
of Montana's attractions, activities and events are linked to its natural resources 
(Figures 2.21 and 2.22 at left). Examples of each are listed below, and more detailed 
information is provided on the pages that follow: 

Attractions 

Natural (God-made) : Mountains, forests, grasslands, rivers, streams, 

lakes, wildlife, landscapes, flora, fossils 
Developed (man-made) : Cities, resorts, ski areas, hotels, campgrounds, 

restaurants, shops, museums, galleries, theaters, parks & recreation facilities 
Publicly-owned or manag ed: national parks/sites, monuments & forests, 

wilderness areas, rivers, lakes and streams, state/county/city parks, 

tribal lands, civic facilities, recreation facilities (pools, golf, etc.) 
Privately-owned : businesses, farms/ranches, homes, golf courses, resorts 

Activities 

Outdoor (Active. Passive) : Hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, 
skiing, rafting, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, golf, 
horseback riding, scenic driving, wildlife viewing, etc. 

Indoor (Active. Passive) : Shopping, swimming, skating, bowling, 
paintball, dining, spas, tours, visiting family/friends, etc. 

Events 

Spectator : Sports events, theater, concerts, reenactments, etc. 
Participatory : Festivals, meetings/conferences, reunions, dances, 
sports competitions (triathalons, fun runs, etc.) 

Support Systems 

Su pplies & Services : Suppliers of goods/services, construction, maintenance, etc. 
Education & Training : Industry knowledge, career training, business resources 
Infrastructure : Transportation, communications, community services, facilities 
Funding & Public Policv : Institutional support, funding for promotion/programming 



18 



Chapter 2: Exktinc; CoNomoNS 



Montana Tcxjrism & Recreation Straticic Pi.an 2003-2007 



C.1 Montana is Rich in Heritage and Cultural Assets 

Montana is rich in its quality and variety of historical and cultural 
assets, from folk music to symphony, cottage crafts to art galleries, pow 
wows to museums and interpretive centers, civic theater to off-broadway, 
ghost towns to urban centers. Montana's famous historical figures include 
Chief Plenty Coups, Chief Joseph, Lewis & Clark's Corps of Discovery, 
General George Custer, The Copper Kings, CM. Russell, Jeanette Rankin 
and many others. Figure 2.23 at right highlights key historic and cultural 
sites/facilities. By viewing these assets on a map, it is possible to see how 
tourism planners can "connect the dots" between historic, cultural, natural 
and urban destinations to develop cultural and heritage corridors, loop 
tours and packaged trips for targeted customer markets. 

Montana contains 2,000+ miles of the Lewis & Clark Trail - 25% of 
the entire route. More than 100 Montana communities lie in the Lewis & 
Clark Trail corridor, along with six of Montana's seven Indian reservations. 
The Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission has led planning and funding efforts for fifteen 
local and five tribal Bicentennial organizations, and a dozen state and federal agencies. As a 
result, Montana is better prepared for the 2003-2006 Bicentennial commemoration than most 
states. However, an additional 4-8 million visitors are projected, and much work remains, as 
Montana has so many miles of the Trail in areas where services/facilities are limited and assets 
are sensitive. Most of the communities along the route are small, rural towns, relying on 
volunteer efforts for planning and implementation. Volunteer burnout and lack of resources to 
manage/maintain sites, facilities and events are serious concerns if Montana is to take advantage 
of economic opportunities offered by the event, without being overrun by Bicentennial visitors. 

A key to balancing increased visitation with protection of natural, historic and cultural 
assets is to target the types of visitors who prefer more developed experiences (museums, 
reenactments, state/national historic sites, events and historic downtowns). Montana has plenty 
of these assets, so it is possible to steer visitors away from sensitive sites/areas and toward more 
developed sites that can handle higher visitor loads. However, developed sites also present 
challenges: higher visitor numbers mean increased costs for staffing, maintenance, 
interpretation, waste removal and utilities. Reliable funding is needed for these items. 



Fig. 2.23: Key Heritoge & Cultural Assets 




est 
, Country Vm 



Lewis 8 Clark Sites ^ 
Key Histonc/CuHural Sites | 
Lewis & Clark Trail ««^ 



Montana is projected to host an 
additional 4-8 million visitors for the 
Lewis d Clark Bicentennial between 
2003 and 2006. Volunteer burnout 
and lack of resources are serious 
concerns if Montana is to take 
advantage of the economic 
opportunity, without being overrun. 

A key to balancing increased 
visitation with protection of assets 
is to target visitors who prefer 
developed experiences over primitive 
ones. It is possible to steer visitors 
away from sensitive sites/areas and 
toward more developed sites that 
can handle higher visitor loads. But 
funding is needed to staff and 
maintain these sites/facilities. 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



19 



Fig. 2.24: Accommodations'* by Region 




C.2 Accommodations Assets Vary Widely by Region 



L •# Lmlfciiie Rooms 
C " W RV/C'amping I nhs 



A'\T<MAccam\ We* '^', 29% T 

T«%TatilBKlTw 

95 lodging properties hove meeting/conference facilities. 
• 4S6 Ranch/Resort /Hot Sprg/Condo/Vac Home/Cabin units not included. 



In Missouri River Country, 
creative options for accommodations 
during the Bicentennial art being 
considered, such as "villages' of tipis 
and outfitter ivall tents. These 
options would give visitors a unique 
experience, while boosting the 
region's economy and lodging tax 
collections. 

Montana's hospitality and service 
received the highest satisfaction 
rating among nonresident visitors in 
2000-2001. Programs like SuperHost! 
help build service skills in the tourism 
and recreation industry. 



Montana has a tremendous variety of accommodations to 
suit customer tastes and preferences, from economy motels to 
luxury resorts, bed & breakfast inns to guest ranches, retreat 
facilities to convention centers, and primitive campsites to full- 
service camping resorts. Figure 2.24 at left shows the number of 
lodging units (guest rooms) and RV/camping spaces for each of 
the six travel regions (numbers are circled). It also shows the 
percentage of units that each region contains compared to the 
statewide total (%A). All private and some public lodging and 
camping facilities collect the 4% lodging tax, which funds tourism 
and recreation promotion and development. 

Additionally, Figure 2.24 compares the lodging tax 
collected by each region to the total amount of tax collected 
statewide (%T). It is interesting to note that while Glacier Country 
contains 34% of the accommodations facilities statewide, it collects 
29% of the lodging tax - the same as Yellowstone Country, with 
21% of the accommodations facilities. This is likely due to the larger number of camping 
facilities in Glacier Country, as well as higher average room rates (and therefore tax charged) in 
Yellowstone Country. Missouri River Country contains 3% of the accommodations facilities, 
and collects 2% of the lodging tax. 

Since Missouri River Country contains a large portion of the Lewis & Clark Trail, 
increased visitation during the Bicentennial will put elevated pressure on existing facilities. 
Creative options are being considered for temporary accommodations (such as "villages" of 
tipis or outfitter wall tents) to handle anticipated travelers. Such lodging options would give 
travelers a unique experience, while boosting economic impacts from the Bicentennial and 
increasing the region's lodging tax collections. 

A statewide survey of nonresident visitors in 2000-2001 by the University of Montana 
Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research (ITRR) revealed that the hospitality and service 
received by visitors from Montanans was given the highest satisfaction rating of all elements of 
the visitors' trips. The SuperHost! hospitality training program and other educational programs 
for businesses have helped to build hospitality and service skills in the tourism industry. 



20 



CHAPTU 2: EXISHNC CoNDmONS 



Montana Tourism & Rkcrfatkw Strategic Plan 20Q3-2007 



C.3 Support Systems Retain Viability of Tourism 

In order for tourism and recreation to be sustainable and 
successful, a number of support systems and services must be in 
place. These critical support systems include: 

■ Su pplies and services : suppliers of goods and services to 
tourism businesses/agencies, such as freight carriers, 
food/beverage wholesalers, agricultural producers, auto 
sales/parts/service, construction, maintenance, insurance, 
banking, landscaping, retail products, etc. 

■ Education and training : knowledge of regional/national and 
international trends and programs, training for employees, 
professional and career development, entrepreneurship. 

■ Infrastructure : transportation (highways, roads, bridges, rest 
areas, air service, car rental, shuttles, taxis, passenger rail, 
local transit, bike/pedestrian facilities, etc., see Figure 2.25), communications systems (visitor 
centers, Internet access, phone services, signage), community services (water/sewer, solid 
waste, law enforcement, medical/EMS) and recreation facilities (boat ramps, parks, etc.). 

" Funding and public policy : stable, dedicated funding resources and public policy support 
for tourism promotion and development, infrastructure and support systems. 

The tourism and recreation industry could not function without the support systems 
outlined above. Moreover, enhanced support systems provide higher quality visitor 
experiences - and higher levels of visitor spending. Direct economic impacts of resident and 
nonresident tourist expenditures result from the initial purchases of goods and services. 
Indirect impacts are not as easily recognized or measurable, and therefore often are not 
considered as the result of tourism and recreation. To see the true impact of tourism and 
recreation on Montana's economy, it is important to track and measure both the direct and 
indirect impacts of visitor spending. 

There are opportunities for the tourism and recreation industry to partner with 
Montana's other industries in mutually-beneficial collaborations. Examples include creating 
systems for more Montana agricultural products to be served to tourists in restaurants, 
cooperative advertising with the Montana Beef Council in targeted geographic markets, etc. 



Fig. 2.25: Montana Transportation Gateways 




v^ iiAs. ConvMCrciol Arports 
^^ ^m fmlixk StotKiM/StoiK 
Mte« tfajor Hivy Access 



Q fiatonr Vortor Cttltrt 



There are opportunities for the 
tourism and recreation industry to 
partner with Montana's other 
industries in mutually-beneficial 
collaborations. Examples include: 

■ Create systems to serve more 
Montana ag/f ood products to 
tourists in restaurants 

■ Cooperative advertising with the 
Montana Beef Council and other 
producer groups 

• Highlight Montana products in 
state visitor centers and rest 
areas (log furniture, etc.) 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 



21 




In 2001, nonresident tourists 
ate 110,000.000 meals m Montana - 
or 2.1 million per week. They spent 
$332 million on restaurant meals and 
beverages, and another $125« million 
on groceries and snacks. 




Montana 
SuperhosI 



CmtfJITrnt^fm^ 



Montana Superhost! Logo 



Supplies and Services 

Tourism and recreation in Montana is interconnected with, and dep>endent upon, many 
other business sectors. Without suppliers of goods and services, tourism and recreation 
providers could not serve their customers. Suppliers include farmers, ranchers, wholesalers, 
freight companies, car dealers, construction companies, repair services, insurance brokers, 
bankers, architects, lawn care services, fuel dealers and many others. Montana's agriculture 
industry seeks to diversify with value-added agricultural products, but with only 900,000 
residents, Montana does not provide a huge consumer market. However, with ten times that 
number of nonresident tourists - 9.5 million in 2001 - there is a substantial market for value- 
added ag products if systematic linkages can be built between food producers and restaurants, 
outfitters and other food service providers (tourists ate 110 million meals in 2001). 

Education and Training 

In the service industry, quality customer service and professionalism are paramount to 
success. Many (if not most) of Montana's tourism and recreation providers are small businesses, 
often without any affiliation to a larger organization or franchise which would provide training 
and professional development. Recent interviews of nonresident visitors indicate contentedness 
with their experiences in Montana, and high satisfaction with Montana's hospitality and service. 
To maintain quality tourism products and services, Montana's educational support system, or 
"Edu-structure" (a term coined by Jeri Mae Rawley of Flathead Valley Community College), is 
critical to the tourism and recreation industry. Key categories of training include: 

1) Professional development for business owners and managers, which currently is available 
through universities, colleges and small business development centers (SBDC's). Industry- 
specific training is preferable; however, programs such as the NxLevel entrepreneurship 
course are valuable for general business management and marketing skills. 

2) "Front-liner" training for current and future customer service employees - a need currently 
being filled by the Montana Superhost! and Teens in Tourism programs. 

3) An information/networking system to share state/national/intemational trends, success 
stories, innovative ideas and implications for Montana, so that stakeholder groups and 
tourism/recreation providers can benefit from. them. In other words, Montana tourism and 
recreation providers need to know "what's going on" elsewhere in the country/world, in 
order to adjust to changing trends and customer needs. 



22 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Stratec3c Plan 2003-2007 



Transportation Infrastructure 

Figure 2.25 on page 21 shows the network of transportation gateways in 
Montana: major highways, airports, Amtrak stations and visitor information 
centers. From 1992 to 2000, the number of Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled (DVMT) 
in Montana rose about 17% from 23+ million miles to about 27 million miles. 
Nonresident visitor studies in 2000-2001 by the University of Montana indicated 
that nonresident travelers are increasingly satisfied with Montana's 
transportation infrastructure. Satisfaction with rest areas is rising: 25% of 2001 
repeat summer travelers said the availability of rest areas has improved, and only 
11% are dissatisfied. Some dissatisfaction with rest areas was expressed by 
Montanans during public meetings for this Strategic Plan. However, Figure 2.26 
at right shows existing and planned rest areas statewide, along with highway 
improvement projects planned through 2005. When completed, these highway 
and rest area improvements will greatly enhance both resident and nonresident 
traveler experiences. 

Montana's location in the Rocky Mountain west creates both benefits and 
challenges for tourism and recreation. The State's remoteness, vast open spaces 
and scenic beauty are its greatest attraction for both residents and visitors. Yet 
these same qualities provide its greatest challenges for transportation providers 
and travelers: it is difficult to get to and through Montana conveniently. Figure 
2.27 is a map of air service routes to and through Montana. Considering 
Montana's size and small population density, it is well-served by air carriers on a 
per capita basis. However, without nonresident tourist travelers (half of all air 
passengers), Montanans would not have the benefits of this level of air service. 

Table 2.3 on the next page shows that commercial air service 
enplanements increased by 33% from 1993 to 2000. It also details the volume of 
traffic at the state's seven major airports. While Billings has the most traffic (29% 
of all statewide enplanements), airlines at all other airports except Great Falls had 
higher traffic growth rates. During 2001, air travel in Montana followed national 
trends, declining after September 11th, but rebounding during the first three 
months of 2002, even surpassing 2001 first quarter enplanements. Table 2.4 (next 
page) shows the airlines and car rental companies that serve each of Montana's 
major destinations. 



Fig. 2.26: Rest Areas & Highway Improvements 




• Ijiislinc, KiM .Arid 

' ^iBI'bniM'd I iii;lmay 

InHTiAt'nu-m 

Source; Montana Dept. of Transportation Statewide Transportation 

Improvement Plan (STIP), ond Montana Rest Area Plon 

Below; One of several new designs for Montana State Rest Areas. 




Fig. 2.27: Airline Routes To/From Montana 




Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



23 





Toble 2,3: Commercial Air Service 


Enplonement Trends by Airport 




Airport 




P«re«nt 

Change 

1M3-2000 


ItM 


ItM 


IMS 


1M6 


1M7 


19M 


19M 


2000 


BMng. 


303855 


308 493 


331 )46 


322023 


317521 


327304 


339,855 


359 524 


18 3% 


Dniww 


174296 


172.902 


1U.710 


195.246 


207.352 


217.308 


221.997 


242.650 


392% 


Bute 


36.742 


36.450 


38.754 


43.461 


44.087 


44.747 


49.133 


48.821 


32 9% 


QwalFato 


122.376 


119.806 


124.538 


121.315 


123.181 


126,216 


136.066 


141.833 


15 9% 


96.176 


60.813 


63.002 


68.368 


72.614 


76.683 


79.862 


76,473 


36 1% 


GtodwPMt 


89 400 


101 715 


114.031 


121.341 


130.638 


133.615 


146.770 


158,821 


77 5% 
40 9% 


Mttouia 


165154 


165 091 


175027 


175.647 


192 000 


202277 


221 387 


232.738 


TOTAL 


948.049 


966.870 


1.032.208 


1,047.398 


1,087.393 


1,128,150 


1,195.070 


1,260.860 


33,0% 



Without nonresident visitors, 
Montana would not have the level 
of passenger air and rail service 
that it currently enjoys. 

Planning efforts for 
increased tourism must include 
planning for impacts on local 
infrastructure and services, such 
OS MKiter/sewer, telecom & EMS. 



Montana also is fortunate to 
have passenger rail service from 
Amtrak's Empire Builder. Figure 
2.28 shows that Amtrak ridership has 
not increased significantly since 1992, 
and ridership dropped substantially 
when Amtrak reduced service to four 
days a week from February 1995 to 
May 1997. In 2000, Amtrak 
boardings and deboardings at its 
twelve stations in Montana totaled 
135,421 passengers. Of that, 42% of the ridership came through the Whitefish station. Shelby 
and Havre each saw about 12% of the ridership, and the remaining 34% (46,925 riders) was 
divided among the other nine stations. Without nonresident tourists, Amtrak would not be able 
to offer service along the hi-line in Montana. Future Amtrak service may be at risk, depending 
on congressional support. 

Tourism and recreation cannot function successfully without local infrastructure, such 
as water/sewer services, utilities, EMS and telecommunications. The condition of local 
infrastructure and services varies greatly across the state, but increases in tourism have an 
impact on them. Planning for this impact is part of the tourism development process. 



Table 


2.4: 


Commercial Air & Car Rental Service by City 








'^^^^':>^^y<^'^^^^'^^ \ 


X XXXXXXXXXX XX 


Big Sky 
Delta 


1 


X ^ X ] X 1 * 1 


X X i , 


X I 1^ j,X ^ 


X 
X 


X 


X 


X 


— 


X 


X 
. X 

X 


— 




X 
X 






X 




Horizon 
Norttiwest 
SkyWtost 
United 


X 


X 


■ X 






X 




X 
X 


X 
X 


,-*- 






X 




_x 




X 
X 




X 














T ""1 ' "T 
























X 


Smart Air 


X 




X 




X 


X ' X 


X 


X 


- 


X 

X 


X 


X 






Au«a 
Hertz 


1 


X 
X 


X 
X 


X 

x" 


X 


X 


X X 1 


X 






X 




XX * X 


X 




X 


X 




Budget 

Enterprise 

National 

Dollar 

Ttiriny 


X 


X 


X 






X X X _j 


- 


X 








- 


X 


X 








X XX 




X. 

X 








-xl 








x1 












X 






! . i 




1 X 







Fig. 2.28: Amtrak Ridership in Montana 1992-2000 
Passenger Rail 




1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2OO0 
-^-Amtrak ridcrahip 



24 



Chaptek 2: Excmw; CoNDmoNS 



Montana Tourism & Rfchfation Strati^gic Pi-an 2003-2007 



Funding and Public Policy 

The tourism and recreation industry needs a rational, consistent public policy 
environment to be sustainable - as does any industry. Changes in public policy over time 
are inevitable as public (citizen) opinion changes, and new leaders are elected. However, a 
rational, common-sense approach to public policy allows sustainability in the industry and 
state's economy, while protecting the values of Montanans. Public policy decisions can 
dramatically impact tourism and recreation. For example, changes in regulations or fees 
affect the profitability of businesses; tax rates affect the disposable income of citizens. Public 
policy also affects infrastructure that supports tourism and recreation, such as funding 
subsidies for passenger rail or air service, historic preservation, the arts or road maintenance. 

The tourism and recreation industry also needs strategic, cooperative marketing 
efforts to promote its products and services to Montanans and nonresident tourists. As in many 
other states, Montana has a lodging tax to fund tourism promotion and development (see 
Montana Code Annotated 15-65, Appendix B). That is, Montana lodging properties collect from 
their customers a 4% tax on each room night or RV/camping space rental. This concept for 
funding tourism promotion is similar to a producer's fee at the point of sale (check-off program) 
to fund the marketing and research efforts of the Montana Wheat & Barley Committee or the 
Montana Beef Council. These revenues provide a stable, dedicated fund for industry promotion 
and development, which keeps Montana in the minds of state, national and international 
travelers who are planning their vacations, conventions, family reunions or other trips. 

The 4% Montana lodging tax is in addition to any other local taxes, such as a resort tax. 
According to the Travel Industry Association of America (TIA), the national average tax rate on 
hotel rooms is 12% (including any sales tax and local option taxes, such as resort, city or 
convention/auditorium taxes). Over the past decade, lodging tax collections in Montana rose 
from $6.06 million in 1990 to $11.5+ million in 2001, an 88% increase. Figure 2.29 at right shows 
how the lodging taxes were used in 2001 (see Appendix B for statutory distribution details). Of 
the $11.5 million collected in 2001, $8.7 million was used for tourism and recreation promotion 
and development programs and staff at the state, regional and CVB level. Of that, $2.6 million 
was spent by Travel Montana on state advertising. The remaining $2.8 million in lodging tax 
went to support the Montana Dept. of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, the Montana Historical Society 
(capitol tours, L&C Commission & grants, Scriver storage), Montana Heritage & Preservation 
Commission, Univ. of Montana tourism & recreation research, Montana Trade Program, State 
Agency Lodging Fund and the Dept. of Revenue (for lodging tax administration/enforcement). 



Fig. 2.29: 2001 Montana Lodging Tax Uses 



Dbp« of Ifevenue »HSA«.C8C ^^^^ 



10% 

Agency Lodging 
13% 



58% 



2.4% 




Mr Trade FYogram 
17% 



State Tourkm 

R^onxxon 
54.S% 



Regions/CVBs 

21 2% 



Table 2.5: 
2001 Uses of Montana Lodging Tax 


Tourism Promotion: 

Dept. of Commerce $6,294,078 i 
16 Tourism RegJons/CVBs 2,446,680 | 


Community Grants (bOC)- 
Cmty Tourism Assessment 
Tourism/Rec'n Infra, Events 


280.000 1 


MT Fish, Wildlife A Parks 


706,819 ' 


MT Historical Society 
Historical sites/signs 
LAC Bicentennial Comm/grants 
Capitol tours, Scriver Collection 


674.702 


MT Heritage Preservation 400,000 ; 
& Development Commission i 
Acquire/manoge historic property | 


Univ. of MT/ITRR - Research 


271,853 1 


Montana Trade Program (DOC) 


200,000 { 


Agency Lodging Reimbursement 
State employee lodging 


150,014 ^ 

t 
f 


Dept. of Revenue 

Collection/admin/enforcement 


115,395 ' 


TOTAL: $11,539,542 



MoMTANA Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNDrrioNS 



25 




Canoeing on the Missouri River 

A top priority for tourism and 
recreation planners is to serve the 
needs of Montanans first: preserve 
their recreation opportunities, 
natural environment and 
of f ordability of recreation. 



Hk' ^-^ 




BSTL^MiJi 


m" "i^^JSyi 


m -<f^0B 


V J 



6reat NJorthem Center, Helena 

Tourism provides revenue for 
businesses, taxes, jobs, fish A 
wildlife monogement. recreation 
facilities, historic preservation, 
events, and transportation services. 



D. Tourism & Recreation Challenges and Threats 

Montana has a strong tourism and recreation industry. However, in spite of (and 
partially because oO its strength, it also faces a number of challenges and threats which must be 
addressed to ensure that the industry is sustainable, and consistent with the values of 
Montanans. During the planning process for this document, public outreach efforts revealed a 
number of consistent and clear messages from Montanans about tourism priorities: 

Serve Montanans first: preserve recreation opportunities, natural environment, affordability 

Maintain the lodging tax for tourism promotion and development 

Address access issues on public and private lands 

Improve Montana's transportation system for residents and visitors 

Retain community heritage, character and sense of place 

Expand heritage and cultural tourism 

Protect Montana's natural, historic and cultural assets: focus on quality, monitor impacts 

Enhance traveler services: rest areas, visitor information centers, signs 

Increase Montanans' awareness about tourism/recreation benefits and impacts 

Address the need for statewide, four-season tourism activities/events/attractions 

Build better collaboration between sectors, organizations, communities and regions 

Provide support systems to assist locally-owned businesses 

Continue the State's lead role in tourism promotion, partnered with regional/local efforts 

Improve tracking and dissemination of results of tourism promotion efforts 

In response to public input, the planning team has identified the issues on the following 
pages as key challenges and threats facing the tourism and recreation industry. 

D.l Tourism Must Balance the Needs of Montanans and Nonresident Visitors 

Tourism - both resident and nonresident visitation - provides many economic and 
social benefits to Montana: revenue that supports businesses and generates taxes, jobs, fees for 
fish and wildlife management, revenues for recreation facilities and historic preservation, event 
attendance, transportation services, diversity of human perspectives, etc. However, in some 
parts of the state, at certain times of the year, the number of nonresident visitors apfTears to 
have an increasingly negative impact on the experience of Montanans, based on public input 
received by the planning team. This is particularly true for fishing and hunting. But the 
impacts need to be quantified. Recent research by the University of Montana found: 



26 



CHAPTT.R 2: EXBTINC CoNomoNS 



Montana Tourism & Rfcreation Strategic P»n 2003-2007 



Montana residents generally agree that the overall benefits of tourism outweigh the 
negative impacts, and they do not feel that the state is becoming overcrowded because of 
tourists.' There are concerns, however, that increases in tourism may affect the overall quality of 
life in Montana, and negatively impact natural, cultural, and historic resources. 

Additionally, the 2000 Community Tourism Assessment Program resident attitude 
survey (ITRR Report 2001-4) found that Montanans are unsure about tourism's influence on 
quality of life. This study revealed that most Montanans are not well informed about the tourism 
industry or its influence. The study concluded that residents lack the information necessary to 
determine whether or not increased tourism will impact their quality of life. 

These findings indicate three key challenges for the tourism and recreation industry: 

1. Better information is needed to determine exactly where, when and how Montanans are 
being negatively impacted by nonresident visitors (as opposed to other resident visitors). 

2. Montanans need better information about the tourism industry, its benefits and impacts, in 
order to develop informed opinions about tourism's impact on their quality of life. 

3. Proactive, cooperative action is needed to address key areas of concern or conflict. 

In specific areas and seasons when impacts are problematic, the tourism and recreation 
industry needs to work proactively with local, state and federal agencies to develop solutions. 
Examples of methods for addressing conflicts include: 

■ Site/facility enhancements to handle increasing visitation (where desirable and practical) 

■ Limits on the number/type of visitors to a specific area (permits, allocation, etc.) 

■ "De-marketing" of a specific area or site so that it is used primarily by "locals" 

■ Marketing of alternative areas/activities/seasons to encourage visitation elsewhere 

■ Reliable tracking and monitoring of visitation, impacts and resident attitudes 

Montana's tourism promotion campaigns have historically focused heavily on the state's 
natural assets: wide open spaces, mountains, rivers, forests, fish, wildlife and nature-based 
recreation. As a result, Montana attracts nonresidents seeking those types of experiences. If 
Montanans feel that there are too many nonresident sportsmen or other outdoor recreationists, 
promotions could de-emphasize natural/primitive experiences, and focus on more controlled or 
developed experiences - in the context of Montana's natural environment and surroundings. 



Montana's tourism promotion 
campaigns historically have focused 
heavily on the state's natural assets: 
wide open spaces, mountains, rivers, 
forests, fish, wildlife and nature- 
based recreation. As a result, 
Montana attracts nonresidents 
seeking those types of experiences. 



Key Challenges regarding Balance 
between Residents & Nonresidents 

1. Tourism planners and promoters 
need specific information about 
where, when and how Montanans 
are negatively impacted by 
nonresident visitors. 

2. Montanans need information 
about the benefits and impacts of 
tourism. 

3. Proactive, cooperative action is 
needed to address conflicts 



"The advertising promotes Montana 
as a great place to go camping. We 
need more focus on images that 
bring tourists who will spend money 
in our hotels and communities. " 
- Tourism industry representative 



I 



\ 



' UM Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research (ITRR) Report 2001-5 
Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 



W- 




Montana Tourism Ad 

Nationally, all State tourism 
offices budgeted a combined $686 
million for promotion in fiscal year 
2000-01. 

Of that, public sector funds 
represented 92%, or $631 million. 
Illinois alone spent $61.1 million on 
tourism promotion in FY 2000-01. 
AAontana spent obout $4 million. 




4-wheelers in Cooke City 



D.2 Lodging Tax Funding for Promotion is Critical to Tourism Sustainability 

Montana's tourism and recreation industry is composed primarily of organizations with 
very limited budgets (small family businesses, state/local agencies, regional tourism groups, 
and local nonprofit and volunteer organizations). These organizations do not have the 
resources to promote effectively to statevk'ide or national markets. Therefore, cooperative efforts 
are necessary to create and develop a destination image for Montana that will attract desired 
resident and nonresident tourists. Without cooperative promotion efforts, Montana would not 
be "on the map", because as tourism has grown to a $454 billion industry, competition for 
visitor dollars is fierce. Compared to many other destinations, Montana's tourism promotion 
efforts are miniscule (Illinois sf)ent $61.1 million on tourism promotion in fiscal year 2000-01). 

Promotional communication with markets is critical, and messages must be strategic 
and targeted. Montana's tourism industry is younger than those in many eastern states or other 
countries, so it has not developed the level of marketing cooperation and sophistication of more 
mature destinations. Therefore, state-led tourism promotion that is funded by the lodging tax is 
critical to the industry's success and sustainability. TIA reports that, nationally, state tourism 
offices budgeted a combined $686 million for promotion in fiscal year 2000-01. Of that, public 
sector funds represented 92 piercent, or $631 million. States use $178 million of the total for 
domestic advertising (average of $3.6 million each), and about $50 million of the total for 
international advertising. Cooperative state and regional promotion efforts funded by lodging 
tax ensure that all organizations are represented - not just large corporate interests. Strategic 
promotion efforts need to continue enhancing year-round revenues in order to create economic 
stability, higher-wage jobs and sustainable businesses, particularly in rural communities. 

D.3 Land and Wildlife Management Issues are a Top Concern 

Access to public and private lands, and protection of Montana's natural resources, were 
top priorities among participants in public meetings and online surveys conducted by the 
planning team. Issues related to public land management included backcountry vs. front 
country access and management, motorized vs. non-motorized uses, restrictions, allocations, 
wilderness and roadless areas, endangered species, sensitive areas (impacts), and management 
of game animals. Issues on private lands included Block Management, access to public lands & 
waters, and management of public wildlife. Details of each issue are too voluminous to 
describe in this document; however, key challenges are the following: 



28 



CiiAnTR 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



Montana Tourism k Rhxheation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



2. 



3. 



1. Discussions of land management issues must involve participants 
from all perspectives: citizens, agencies, representatives from 
communities, tourism industry, sportsmen's organizations, tribes, 
wildlife and conservation organizations, historical/cultural groups. 

Solutions need to focus first on "ends" - finding common ground 
based on the values of Montanans, then to focus second on 
"means" - v^ays to achieve the "ends." 

Sustainability and high quality experiences are key goals; however, 
defining these terms in tangible, measurable ways presents its own 
challenges. 

In order to properly manage resources, either for "natural" or 
"developed" experiences, baseline data and regular monitoring of 
impacts are necessary. In many cases, good baseline data does not 
exist - or is not collected in a consistent format - so as to measure 
problems or progress. 

A number of "hot spots" were identified by citizens and land managers as areas 
of concern related to tourism and recreation growth (see Figure 2.30). These 
"hot spots" include: Big Hole, Gallatin, Upper Missouri, Blackfoot and others. 

Agencies that manage public lands and wildlife face limited 
funding/budgets/staffing to effectively manage and monitor all issues and sites. 
Cooperative partnerships with local and regional organizations are necessary 
for land management challenges to be addressed effectively. 

Changing population demographics (e.g., aging Baby Boomers) and a strong 
economy have increased demand for motorized recreation (Figure 2.31). 

Low commodity prices force private landowners to seek alternative revenue 
sources from their land. Maintaining public access entails significant 
commitments of landowner time and resources, with little or no compensation. 

Projected visitation during the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial could present significant short- 
term impacts. Preparations are progressing, but more is needed if projections are accurate. 

It is incumbent upon Montana's tourism and recreation industry partners to address 
land and wildlife issues proactively - to be part of the discussions and solutions - if the tourism 
industry is to receive continued support from Montanans. 



Fig. 2.30: Hot Spots Map 



8. 



9. 




Fig. 2.31: Motorized Recreation Trends in Montana 



30«IO ^ 




Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing CoNomoNS 



29 




Montana's sparse population 
makes transportation infrastructure 
extremely expensive and inefficient 
on per capita basis. Tourism 
supports enhanced transportation 
services, which benefit Montana 
citizens and businesses. 




Nevada City 

Tourists can help pay to 
preserve f^oniana's historical and 
cultural assets through entrance 
and tour fees, donations to historic 
trusts, participation at special 
events, and awareness-building 
beyond Montana's borders. 



D.4 Transportation is Key to Montana's Economic Stability 

Montana's remote location from urban populations on America's east and west coasts 
requires efficient and cost-effective air and ground transportation to sustain tourism. Moreover, 
Montana's sparse population (902,000, or 6.2 jjeople per square mile) makes transportation 
infrastructure extremely expensive and inefficient on a per capita basis. Transportation services 
support all of Montana's industries, from tourism to agriculture, high-tech to retail. Tourism 
helps transportation carriers/agencies generate revenues (tickets, gas taxes, airport fees, car 
rentals) that sustain service for Montanans. Transportation challenges include the following: 

1. Seasonality of tourism in Montana decreases profitability and service of transportation 
carriers (airlines, car rental agencies, passenger rail, shuttle services, etc.). 

2. Amtrak's future is uncertain; the Empire Builder route could be eliminated. 

3. Impacts from increased tourism and recreation at specific sites will necessitate alternate 
transportation modes (shuttles, etc.). 

Transportation solufions are neither easy nor inexpensive. Strategic decisions and 
actions by Montana's tourism industry can assist and complement the transportation needs of 
Montana's other industries, and benefit all Montanans. 

D.5 Heritage and Cultural Assets are Important to Montanans and Visitors Alike 

Montana's history and culture are rich and varied, from Indians to Virginia City, Lewis 
& Clark to the copper barons, cattle drives to plow shares, folk music to symphony, civic theater 
to off-broadway, traditional crafts to modem art. Preservation and enhancement of 
irreplaceable historical and cultural assets not only are important to Montanans, but they also 
are significant tourist draws. Heritage and cultural travel is the largest and fastest growing 
segment of the tourism industry worldwide. Tourists can help pay some of the costs to 
preserve Montana's treasures through entrance and tour fees, donations to historic trusts, 
participation at special events and awareness-building beyond Montana's borders. As state and 
federal budgets tighten, entrepreneurial approaches are increasingly imjwrtant to preservation 
of historic and cultural assets. These treasures are attractive to tourists because they are unique 
to Montana, so inclusion of historic/cultural sites and events in packaged tours and 
heritage/cultural corridors will encourage greater awareness and support of them among 
tourists and Montanans alike. Corporate support can be garnered when historic and cultural 
groups partner with other organizations within the tourism industry. 



30 



ClIATrER 2: EXBTINC CoNDmONS 



Montana Tourism It Rfctieation SniATBGic Pi.an 2003-2007 



D.6 



Diversification of Tourism is Critical to Sustainability 



Montana is changing. Tourism is changing. Customer tastes and preferences are 
changing. Change is inevitable. But it is possible to manage the de gree of change, and the 
direction of change, based on the values and priorities of Montanans. To maximize the 
economic benefits of tourism while minimizing negative impacts, tourism must be diversified, 
and distributed throughout the year. Promotion of activities like fishing can be de-emphasized 
for nonresidents in order to minimize conflicts. Meanwhile, activities like heritage/cultural 
travel and meetings/conventions, which maximize existing assets without significant impacts 
on residents' favorite recreation spots, can be emphasized. Visitor activities can be managed 
through packaging of attractions, daily itineraries and suggested tour routes that avoid 
Montanans' favorite fishing holes or hunting camps. More money can be captured from pass- 
through travelers by providing enhanced visitor services, to maximize revenue and jobs from 
existing markets. The needs of emerging markets, such as "Weekend Getaway" travelers, 
"Extended Family" groups and "Geo-tourists" can be met with specific packages, products and 
services which complement, rather than compete with, the needs of Montanans. 

D.7 Traveler Services are Key to Enhancing Quality Experiences 

According to University of Montana research in 2000-2001, pass-through travelers 
represent nearly one-half of all travelers in spring, and about one-third of travelers in winter. 
Only 64% of these visitors were satisfied with the availability of travel information during their 
trip through Montana (verses 71% of summer travelers satisfied). Less than half of Winter 
travelers, and only 59% of Spring visitors, were satisfied with the availability of rest areas 
(verses 61% of Summer visitors). About 80% of visitors were satisfied with directional signage, 
with Winter visitors being slightly less satisfied. Many VICs are open only from Memorial Day 
to Labor Day, so visitors who travel in shoulder seasons often are left to fend for themselves. If 
a goal is to increase off-peak season travel, visitor services must be enhanced to serve those tourists 
during off-peak times. One way to accomplish this is to create partnerships for visitor services 
with public, private, nonprofit and tribal entities. Although staffed visitor centers are optimal, 
static visitor information displays and brochure racks or kiosks at rest areas and other high 
traffic locations are helpful. Staffing and volunteers can be shared between several partner 
organizations to lighten the load of any single organization. 

Additionally, as tourist tastes and preference change, businesses need to adjust their 
products and services to meet the changing needs of their customers. Business support services 



What is a 6eo- tourist? 

"Scotourism" is defined as tourism 
that sustains or enhances the 
geographical character of the place 
being visited - its environment, 
culture, aesthetics, heritage, and the 
well-being of its residents. 55 million 
Americans are now classified as 
sustainable, or Seotourists. 




Bozeman Rest Area 



Pass-through travelers represent 
nearly half of all travelers in spring, 
and nearly one-third of travelers in 
winter. Enhanced visitor sexyxcts 
would better capture the pass- 
through tourist's time and dollars. 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 



31 



'Circle the wogons oiMi shoot in." 

When tourism and recreation 
entities focus on conflict, turf ism 
and competition within the state, 
no one wins. Montana's competition 
is not from within - it is from 
other states and countries globally. 

Montana is not on eosy 
destination to "buy' - it must 
become more user-friendly to 
attract the most desirable 
customer morkets. 




Beortooth Highway 



and technical assistance are critical to providing high quality visitor services and overall 
excellence in tourism to both resident and nonresident visitors. 

D.8 Effective Tourism Requires Good Information, Cooperative Efforts 

Good planning and decision-making require good information. The University of 
Montana has extensive statewide research about Montana's nonresident visitors. However, key 
details about resident and nonresident tourists, and regional differences between visitor trends 
and demographics (in specific areas, sites and seasons) are sketchy or nonexistent. Visitor 
counts at many key sites - some that may be experiencing increased impacts - are unreliable. 
The amount, consistency and accuracy of visitor information must be enhanced so that effective 
decisions can be made regarding tourism promotion, asset management and support services. 

Additionally, Montana tourism industry partners need to be just that - partners. 
Montana's regions, cities, attractions and events are not competing with each other for 
nonresident visitors - they are competing with other states and even other countries globally. 
To put Montana on the map for targeted high-value visitor segments, they must work together. 
Conflict, competition and turfism only create an atmosphere of "circle the wagons and shoot in" 
- no one wins. As stated earlier, Montana spends about $4 million on state promotions, versus 
states like Illinois that spend $61 million. The only way that Montana can compete for targeted 
visitor markets is to leverage dollars between public, private, tribal and nonprofit organizations. 
The lack of cooperation and coordination sends mixed messages to potential customers - 
creating information clutter and confusion. Montana's niche and image for specific markets 
(conventions, destination skiing, cultural attractions, golf) is not clearly defined or promoted 
consistently by state and regional partners. 

In a society where time is money, consumers will buy the products that are most user- 
friendly and understandable. Montana is not an easy destination to "buy" - there are few 
opportunities for "one call" service and packaged experiences. Cultural and heritage corridors, 
scenic byways, loop tours and theme trips all provide user-friendly vacation planning for 
potential customers. Montana's tourism and recreation partners must focus on developing and 
packaging their product effectively if they are to attract desired tourist customers - those that 
will complement the values and priorities of Montanans. 



32 



Chapter 2: Existinc; CoNomoNS 



Montana Tcxjrism it Rfc-reation Strategic Pi an 2003-2007 



The next chapter delves further into the subject of potential tourist markets, their 
characteristics and needs, and identifies top priority markets for Montana that are consistent 
with the values, vision and goals identified in this Strategic Plan. 



Summary of Existing Conditions 

While Montana's population and tourism industry has grown over the past decade, its 
economic growth and diversification has lagged behind national averages and surrounding 
states. Montana is last among states in wages and income. The tourism industry can contribute 
significantly to Montana's economy and job base, but, as in other economic strategies, tourism 
must be diversified and developed strategically to attract high value, low impact visitors, and to 
create stable, year-round jobs with benefits. Problems with seasonality and regional differences 
must be addressed to the extent possible, with strategies to increase heritage and cultural 
tourism, meetings and conventions and specialty packages for targeted customer markets. 
Support services need to be enhanced, such as visitor information services and transportation. 
Negative impacts on residents' quality of life and Montana's natural resources need to be 
minimized by attracting sustainable, low-impact visitors - those looking for developed cultural 
experiences rather than primitive natural ones. Montana's small businesses need support 
through technical assistance and education, and statewide efforts must be supported by public 
policy and lodging tax funding to be effective. Finally, tourism industry partners must work 
together as a team to be competitive in a global tourism market. 



The tourism industry con 
contribute significantly to Montana's 
economy and job base, but, as in other 
economic strategies, tourism must be 
diversified and developed strategically 
to attract high value, low impact 
visitors, and to create stable, year- 
round jobs with benefits 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 2: Existing Conditions 



33 



(This page deliberately left blank) 



34 Chaptoi 2: ExLSTiNG Conditions Montana Tourism k. Rhc-rkatton SniA-recic Plan 2003-2007 



Success in tourism and recreation requires a market-driven approach: businesses 
and agencies must respond to the needs, priorities and trends of current and potential 
customers (tourists). In this context, "tourist markets" refer to both Montana residents 
and nonresidents who visit the state, either for leisure or business purposes. The 
objectives and actions identified in Chapter 5 of this Strategic Plan are designed to 
respond to the markets, so before discussing the strategic actions that are proposed, it is 
important to have a clear understanding of Montana's current and potential markets. 

Summary of Key Findings about Montana's Current Travelers 

The following are highlights of market research that is detailed in sections B and 
C. Section A (next page) provides context by summarizing national tourism trends. 

■ More tourists are coming, but in summer, they're spending less. Montana hosted 
9.6 million nonresident visitors in 2001, and they spent $1.7 billion. Nearly 60% 
visited in summer, and while summer visitor groups increased by 4% over 1996 
levels, spending decreased by $28.5 million (3%). The average traveler group size 
and length of stay both declined from summer 1996 to summer 2001. 

■ The majority of visitors originate from nearby states/provinces, California and 
Minnesota. The top nine states/provinces of origin in 2001 were WA, ND, CA, WY, 
ID, MN, ALB, CO, OR and UT. 

■ Interest in historical/cultural attractions and passive outdoor activities increased 
from 1996. Participation in active outdoor recreation and wildlife viewing declined. 
Participation in shopping and day hiking was strong in all seasons. 

■ 44% of all travelers were vacationing in Montana, while 28% were just passing 
through. Another 16% were visiting friends/relatives and 10% were on business. 

■ Most of Montana's tourists are repeat visitors (75-95%+). This may be due in part 
to frequent pass-through travel from neighboring states, to visiting family (e.g., 
college students, snowbirds), and/or to nonresident vacation homeowners. 

■ Montanans spent 73% of their travel dollars ($707 million) out of state. In 1999, 
Montanans took 9.2 million leisure trips, and spent $962 million. 44% of trips were 
day trips in Montana, while 297o were in-state overnight trips, and 27% were 
overnight trips out of state. They spent $707 million (73%) outside the state. 



1 



Chapter 3: 
Markets 

Summary of Key Findings 

A. Potential Markets: 
National Tourism Trends 

B. Resident Visitor Trends 

C. Non-Resident Visitor Trends 

D. Montana's Competitive Niche 

E. Top Priority Target Markets 



While the number of nonresident 
summer traveler groups in Montana 
increased by 79,240 (4%) from 1996 to 
2001, the actual number of people 
dropped about 21,000, and total 
spending decreased by $28.5 million 
(3%). The visitors' travel group size and 
length of stay both declined. 

On the other hand, the number of 
winter visitors increased 37% from 1998 
to 2001, which was a recovery from a 
decline of 24% from 1993 to 1998. 
Therefore, the overall number of winter 
visitors grew 5% from 1993 to 2001. 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 3: Markets 



35 



Potential Markets: National Tourism Trends 




CM. Russell Museum 




Crow Fair Parade 



Nationally and internationally, the tourism industry has changed dramatically 
over the past decade. Customer demographics, tastes and preferences have changed, 
travel planning has changed, transportation has changed, and national and international 
competition has changed. Some of these trends present challenges for Montana, but 
more of them present opportunities. This section provides a brief overview of the 
following national and international tourism and recreation trends, and summarizes the 
implications for Montana tourism and recreation stakeholders: 

1 . The Time Crunch Affects Travel Planning 

2. Women Make the Decisions 

3. Mature Travelers Rule 

4. Family Values are Back (Families are Blended & Multi-Generational) 

5. History & Culture are the #1 Attraction 

6. Festivals Attract One-Fifth of All Travelers, esp. Young Families 

7. Rural Places are Appealing 

8. Packaged Niche Products are a Key to Success 

9. Business Travelers Deserve More Attention 

10. Non-Business Meetings & Conventions are Big Business 

11. Canadians are Returning 

12. Europeans Spend Five Times More Time & Money 

13. Adventure and Geo-Tourists are Large Markets 

14. Sportsmen Numbers Remain Steady, More Women Join the Club 

15. Tourists Shop 'Til They Drop 

Volumes of insightful tourism research are available on each of these topics - 
much of it from the Tourism Industry Association of America (TIA). The following 
pages summarize only key highlights and trends. At the end of this section (pages 44- 
45) is a summary of challenges and opportunities for Montana, based on these national 
tourism trends. More information is available from the resources listed in Appendix C. 



36 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Rkcheation Strategic Pi.an 2003-2007 



A.1 The Time Crunch Affects Travel Planning 

Americans are taking shorter, more frequent trips, closer to home. Weekend 
trips by Americans jumped by more than 70% in the past decade and now account for 
more than half (547o) of all U.S. travel. Forty percent of weekend travelers report they 
are taking more day trips and/or weekend trips (38%) today than five years ago. Interest 
in longer trips lasting more than one week seems to be declining. Repeat visitation also 
is declining: three-quarters (77%) agree that the next vacation will be someplace they 
have never been before. 

Americans are spending less time on trip planning, and becoming techno-savvy 
consumers. Half of U.S. adults are online (100+ million people), and 59 million people 
use the Internet to plan trips (half of whom are Baby Boomers, and 16% make $100,000+ 
per year). Travelers' initial interest in a destination still is generated from friends and 
family, media, word-of-mouth or co-workers, but they use the web to find details, prices 
and updated information, and many book their trip/package online. 

"Time-impoverished consumers are more self confident, feel in control, generally 
will not compromise, and rely on their own instincts, rather than experts," according to 
Peter Yesawich (see sidebar). "Once a destination is decided, the traveler seeks the best 
buy. Therefore, packaging becomes very important: convenience sells ." 

A.2 Women Make the Decisions 

Women still do the family planning: they make three-quarters of all travel 
decisions. Their top concerns are safety, hygiene, "creature comforts", shopping and 
convenience - one-stop travel planning, such as cruises and all-inclusive packages. 
Destinations that may be "dangerous" (whitewater, remote, wild animals, etc.), are not 
"kid-friendly" (no programmed age-appropriate activities), or are difficult to "buy" 
(require time-consuming web searches, reading or phone calls) are not as attractive as 
more convenient locations. In 2001, 70% of women reported an interest in a destination 
that included air fare, accommodations, food, hotel transfers and recreation activities. 
Women are most interested in beautiful scenery (90%), theme parks, spa destinations 
and places they've never been before (82%); as well as the arts, architecture and historic 
sites (57%). 



Time is the New Currency" 

♦ Americans are taking shorter, more 
frequent trips, closer to home. 

♦ Weekend trips* by Americans Jumped 
70%* in the past decade; now more 
than half (54%) of all U.S. travel. 

♦ 40% of weekend travelers take more 
day trips and/or weekend trips (38%) 
today than 5 years ago. 

♦ Interest in longer trips (1* week) 
seems to be declining: 43% of 
weekend travelers take fewer long 
trips than 5 years ago. 

♦ Repeat visitation is declining: 77% soy 
next vacation will be someplace they 
have never been before. 

♦ Americans spend less time on trip 
planning: 59 million people use the 
Internet (half are Baby Boomers) 

♦ Once a destination decision is made, 
travelers seek the best buy. 

♦ A "weekend trip" is defined by TIA as an 
overnight leisure trip of 1-5 nights, 50* miles from 
home, including a Friday, Saturdoy or Sunday night 
stay. 

Sources: Travel Industry Association of Amerioi; 
Peter C. Yesawich, Yesawich, Pepperdine & Brown. 



Women make 75% of all travel 
decisions. Their top concerns when 
choosing and booking a destination are 
safety, hygiene, "creature comforts," 
shopping and convenience. 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 3: Markets 



37 



Americor\s ovtr 50 ore responsible 
for 80% of oM leisure travel, and they 
control 75% of the nation's wealth. 



Mature Travelers 

• College educated 

• $7?,(XX>« annual household income 

• More tech sowy than 5 years ogo 

• Spend on average of $431 per trip (vs. 
overage spring traveler in Montana at 
$292/trip, $341 winter) 

• Favorite trip activities: 

• Shopping (29%) 

• Historical places & museums (15%) 

• Cultural events & festivals (12%) 

• Gambling (11%) 

• Outdoor activities (11%) 

• Visiting porks (8%) 

• Going to the beach (7%) 

• Golf /tennis/skiing (3%) 




Museum of the Rockies 



Critical Factors in Family 
[destination Decisions: 

Value for the money: 
Variety of things to do: 
Activities designed for kids: 




A.3 Mature Travelers Rule 

The "Mature" travel market is divided into two segments: the "junior Matures" 
(ages 50-64) and the "Senior Matures" (ages 65+). This over-50 age group is responsible 
for 80% of all leisure travel in the United States, and they control 75% of the nation's 
wealth. As more of the Baby Boomers enter this market segment, their influence will be 
enormous on travel products and services. For example, the Boomers will contribute to 
a 1-2% annual growth rate in the golf industry. Mature travelers tend to seek active - 
but not strenuous - activities, heritage/cultural experiences and soft adventure. Many 
bring their grandkids, and they expect quality amenities and excellent service. Mature 
travelers often travel in off-peak months (Sept.-Nov., Mar.-May), making them an 
attractive market for building shoulder seasons, if appropriate services are available. 

A.4 Family Values are Back 

Family travel has increased in the United States, as Americans attempt to return 
to core values in a changing society. People with children prefer to take them on family 
trips (87%). "Family" travelers often include three generations, or blended families, or 
nontraditional families, or several families traveling together. Virtually all family 
travelers feel that family vacations are important to maintaining their family's health, 
well-being and lifestyle (94%). Families seek age-appropriate, pre-packaged activities 
and itineraries that give them family time together, but also social time with peers. The 
most critical factors in the destination decision are "value for the money" (92%) and 
"variety of things to do" (91%), although among parents, "activities designed for 
children" (87%) are nearly as important. 

A.5 History & Culture are the #1 Attraction 

Heritage and cultural travel is the largest and fastest growing segment of the 
travel industry worldwide (65% of all U.S. travelers include heritage/cultural 
experiences on their vacations). Many travelers extend their trips sf)ecifically to 
participate in cultural or historic events and activities. This is linked to the burgeoning 
numbers of traveling Baby Boomers, who are more interested in their roots than their 
parents were. This segment is more educated and affluent than the average traveler. 
They recognize and support the intrinsic value of the arts, culture and history to society. 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreatk>n Stratfcic Plan 2003-2007 



Heritage/cultural travelers seek vacations that are cerebral and enriching - they want to 
do more than sit on a beach or go sightseeing. They enjoy interactive learning 
experiences and a better understanding of the world around them, from western history 
to American Indian culture, symphony to folk music, theater to historic downtowns. 
They like to shop, dine and take guided or self-guided tours (they are big consumers of 
guidebooks). They expect authenticity, historical integrity, quality and amenities. The 
majority of Lewis & Clark Bicentennial visitors fit this profile. 

A.6 Festivals Attract One-Fifth of All Travelers, esp. Young Families 

One-fifth of U.S. adults (21%) attended a festival while on a trip away from home 
in the past year. Of those, one-third attended an arts or music festival, making it the 
most popular type of festival to attend while traveling. Twenty-two percent attended an 
ethnic, folk or heritage festival. This was followed by county or state fairs (20%), 
parades (19%), food festivals (12%) and religious festivals (11%). Thirty percent 
attended some other type of festival. Compared to the average of all U.S. travelers, 
festival travelers are likely to be younger (age 41), have children in their household 
(52%), have two or more wage earners (51%) with a household income of $53,000. 

A.7 Rural Places are Appealing 

America's increased interest in family values, patriotism and nostalgia has 
focused attention on rural areas as tourist destinations: small towns, open spaces, 
country experiences, rural festivals. Sixty-two percent of all U.S. adults took a trip to a 
small town or village in the U.S. within the past three years. The majority (55%) of rural 
travelers took their spouse along, and 33% took their children. Most of these trips were 
for leisure purposes (86%) and, the most popular reason for traveling to a small town or 
rural area was to visit friends or relatives (44%). Baby Boomers find rural travel 
especially appealing, as they are more likely than younger or older travelers to visit 
small towns or villages for reasons other than visiting friends and relatives. 



Heritage & Cultural Travelers 
Have Economic Benefits 

• More educated 4 affluent than other 
travelers 

■ 32% extended their trip for 
cultural/historic events and activities 

" 62% use hotels/motels/BAB's 

■ 44% go shopping during their trip 

■ Other activities: state/national/theme 
parks, outdoor activities, beaches 

■ 18% spend $1,000+ when traveling (vs. 
12% of all travelers) 

• Average stay is 4.7 nights (vs. 3.4 nights 
for all U.S. travelers) 




Montana Sucst Ranch 

"There is definitely a market for rural 
attractions. Small- town America appeals 
to many travelers because of its unique 
charm, in addition to the wide variety of 
activities and history. The quie t pace is 
an alternative to the hustle and bustle of 
larger cities. * 

- William S. Norman, President/CEO, 
Travel Industry Assn. of America 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



39 



Niche products work best when they 
showcase the destination's unique history 
or characteristics - or the business owners' 
particular talents or passions. 

Who arc the Business Travelers? 

(1998 Study - TLA) 

• Professional nviles (60%), more females 

• Average age is 42 - up from 40 in 1991 
(more oge 45-54, fewer oge 25-34) 

• Average income is $76,100 - up from 
$68,900 in 1996 (larger proportion of 
business travelers earning $75,000+ and 
smaller proportion making <$30,000) 

• Health. Legal and Education sector 
business travelers increased steadily, 
from 19% in 1991 to 25% in 1998 

• Professional/Managerial business 
travelers reached all-time high in 1994 
(55% of all business travelers), but has 
decreosed since then to 47% 

• Averoge business traveler took 5.4 
business trips in 1998, stayed 3.3 nights 

■ 38% of trips involve more than 1 person 

• 21% combine business A vacation (esp. 
women & less frequent travelers) 

Implications 

• Business travelers are affluent, stay 
multiple nights, interested in extending 
stays for vacation 

• Women seek amenities, safety 

• Business travelers are potential targets 
for Montana's economic development and 
business recruitment efforts 



f<''rV'.'9WA»J9imi 



A.8 Packaged Niche Products are the Key to Success 

Americans are increasingly more discerning about their leisure travel choices: 
they want experiences tailored to their unique tastes and preferences. Specialty and 
theme experiences, "boutique" trips and unique packages appeal to various market 
segments, whether their interest is golf, bird watching, gourmet cooking, jazz music. 
Native arts, massage, cowboy poetry, antique cars, photography, "whodunit" mysteries 
or mining history. Events and packaged trips that target niche markets give travelers a 
"reason" to visit (e.g., theme trips targeting grandparents/grandkids, women's only, or 
featuring "guest experts" who teach watercolor painting, geology, wine tasting or Lewis 
& Clark history). 

Niche products work best when they showcase a destination's unique history or 
characteristics - or a business owners' particular talents or passions. Authentic 
experiences attract travelers who take the most trips and spend the most money. 

A.9 Business Travelers Deserve More Attention 

In 1998, nearly one-in-five U.S. adults (44 million) took at least one business trip, 
and the average business traveler took 5.4 business trips. This was a 14% increase since 
1994, and a 2% increase since 1996, according to TIA and OAG Worldwide research. 
Business travelers tend to be significantly more affluent than the average traveler. Their 
average stay was 3.3 nights, and most business travelers (84%) spent at least one night 
away from home on their most recent trip (nearly three-quarters stayed in a hotel or 
motel). About 38% of the business trips involved more than one business traveler. 
Nearly half of all business travelers (47%) were traveling to attend a meeting, trade 
show or convention on their last business trip. One-in-five business travelers (21%) 
combined business and vacation on their last business trip . Women and less frequent 
business travelers were more likely to combine business and vacation in one trip. 
Women business travelers seek safety (parking lot lighting, locks, security, social 
experiences other than bars) and amenities (ironing boards, hair dryers, etc.). Business 
travelers are big consumers of amenities: dining, room service, adult beverages, high- 
sfjeed Internet access, pay-per-view movies, dry cleaning, hair salons, gift shop items 
(for spouse/kids left at home), spa services,' taxis, rental cars, etc. They also are 
interested in shopping, arts, culture, history, sports, golf, fishing and hunting. 



40 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism k RECRRAnoN Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



A.IO Non-Business Meetings & Conventions are Big Business 

One in five Americans (20%) traveled for non-business conferences or organized 
events - for personal, social, civic or religious reasons - in the past five years, according 
to TIA. This translates to 40.8 million U.S. adults who traveled 100+ miles to attend such 
events. A non-business conference is defined as a conference, meeting or special event 
unrelated to job or occupation. In 1999 alone, 27 million U.S. adults (13% of U.S. adults) 
attended a non-business conference. 

The most popular non-business conferences were organized religious 
conferences, with nearly one-third (30%) of U.S. adults traveling to one in the past five 
years. Self-improvement or educational conferences were about one-in-five non- 
business conferences (21%), followed by hobby-related conferences (20%). Other types 
were alumni, fraternity or sorority reunions (9%), political rallies or conventions (5%) 
and military reunions (3%). Non-business conference travelers spent an average of $529 
on their most recent non-business conference trip, including transportation, 
accommodations and meals (the average nonresident traveler in Montana spent $292 per 
trip in spring, $460 in summer). About 10% of these travelers spent more than $1,000 on 
their most recent non-business conference trip, while about one-third (37%) spent less 
than $250. More than two-thirds (70%) stayed in a hotel/motel/B&B. 

Non-business conference visitors tend to be less demanding about facilities and 
amenities than do business/corporate conference visitors: they tolerate a lack of "under 
one roof" hotel/convention centers, state-of-the-art audio/visual technology, business 
center amenities and air service connections. Additionally, they often bring family 
members, or return to conference destinations later for a family vacation. Destinations 
and meeting planners who provide various activities for family members, and include a 
variety of venues in conference events, are more likely to draw additional participants. 

A.ll Canadians are Returning 

Canadian visitation to the U.S. rose 9% from 1998 to 2000, after several years of 
decline because of unfavorable exchange rates. A 2001 survey conducted by Expedia 
Canada Corp./Ipsos-Reid indicated that 81% of Canadians consider pleasure trips a very 
important part of their overall quality of life, and that 89% planned to take a vacation in 
2002. Fifty-nine percent of Canadians were either planning to (or seriously considering) 



Non- Business Meetings & Conventions 

• 20% of Americans participated in a non- 
business conference/event in post 5 yrs 

■ 30% were religious conferences 

■ 21% were self-improvcment/education 

• 20% were hobby-related 

■ 9% alumni/fraternity/sorority reunions 

• 5% were political rallies/conventions 

■ 3% were military reunions 

• Average spending: $529/person/trip 
(vs. 2001 MT travelers spent $292- 
$460/trip) 

■ 70% stayed in hotel/motel/BAB 

■ Conferees often bring family, extend 
stay or return for vacation 

Implications 

■ Montana is an attractive destination for 
non-business conferences 

■ Higher participation and extended stays 
result from planned/guided/supervised 
activities for spouses and kids 

• Historic/cultural attractions make 
creative convention venues (museum, art 
gallery, theater, mansion, barn or park) 

■ Future return visitation for vacations 
results from incentives (packages, etc.) 

Tmmmmammmmmammmmamammmmm 

Cautlonl 
Nkitionally, the amount of convention 
space will jump 25% by 2007, as 96 new or 
expanded convention centers open a 
combined 16.8 million sq. ft. of new exhibit 
space costing about $12 billion. Meanwhile, 
growth in business convention/trade show 
attendance has slowed. (Tradeshow Week) 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 3: Markets 



41 




Hiking near Dupuyer 



Hord d Soft Adventure Travelers 

• Adventure travel is most popular 
with Sen Xers. Baby Boomers, men 
and westerners 

■ Most popubr hard adventure trips- 
Whitewater rafting, kayaking, 
snorkeling, scuba diving, off- 
road/mountain biking 

• Most popukir soft adventure trips: 
camping, hiking, biking 

• Typical hard adventure traveler is 
35 years old, college educated, 
employed full time 

■ Soft adventure traveler more likely 
to bring spouse, kids 

• Hard adventurers spend more than 
soft adventurers ($465 vs. $325) 



travel in the U.S., and 61% were either planning to (or seriously considering) travel 
elsewhere internationally. 

When planning a vacation, 80% of Canadians prefer to research their own travel 
plans. Canadians like packages and "deals": 81% prefer pay-one-price vacations that 
have choice and flexibility in them, compared to 14% who prefer set packages. Of those 
surveyed, 87% indicated they were likely to use the Internet to research vacations, and 
54% indicated that they were likely to book and purchase vacations on the Internet. 

A.12 Europeans Spend Five Times More Time & Money 

European tourists spend five times more time and money visiting the U.S. than 
domestic tourists. The average domestic traveler spends $331 per trip, and the average 
international traveler spends $1,530 per trip. Europeans have, on average, five weeks of 
government-mandated vacation time, plus up to sixteen annual public holidays. These 
tourists are more likely to visit during off-peak seasons than domestic travelers. Many 
European visitors also are more willing to visit "off-the-beaten-path" rural attractions or 
destinations than domestic visitors. The "detriments" of rural destinations like Montana 
(lack of population, access) often are viewed as benefits to Europeans seeking green and 
of>en destinations. International tourists also enhance the visitor experience for 
domestic travelers and create additional perceived value, according to TIA. 

A.13 Adventure and Geo-Tourists are Large Markets 

In 1997, half of Americans (98 million adults) had taken an adventure vacation in 
the past five years. Of those, 92 million adults took soft adventure vacations (skiing, 
sailing, horseback riding), while 31 million Americans took hard adventure vacatiorw 
(mountain climbing, skydiving, cave exploring). Twenty-five million took both . 

Adventure travel is most popular with Generation Xers, Baby Boomers, men and 
people who live in the West. The most popular hard adventure activities are Whitewater 
rafting/kayaking, snorkeling/scuba diving and off-road biking/mountain biking. The 
most popular ssft adventure activities are camping, hiking and biking. Hard adventure 
travelers are more likely to be young, single and have higher household incomes: the 
typical hard adventure traveler is 35 years old, with some college education and is 
employed full time. A significantly larger share of soft adventure travelers took spouses 



42 



ChatthrS: Markets 



MorJTANA Tourism & Recreation SniATECic Pi^n 2003-2007 



(60% vs. 42%) and children/grandchildren (41% vs. 18%) on their most recent adventure 
vacation than did hard adventure travelers. Destination skiers and snowmobilers tend 
to have higher levels of education and affluence than other travelers, and seek high 
quality experiences. 

Geotourism is defined as "tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical 
character of the place being visited - its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage, and 
the well-being of its residents," according to a study by National Geographic and TIA. 
"Geotourism is environmentally and culturally responsible and it seeks to preserve the 
distinctive attributes that make each destination a special place to visit." Fifty-five 
million Americans are officially classified as "geo-tourists," with another 100 million 
Americans moving in that direction, according to TIA. 

A.14 Sportsmen Numbers Remain Steady, More Women Join the Club 

"Outdoor sportsmen" include both men and women. While men are nearly two- 
thirds (61%) of them, women are catching up. Sportsmen like to travel into the 
countryside, remote locales and wilderness in order to enjoy outdoor activities, 
especially hunting and fishing. After several years of decline, the number of hunting 
licenses sold nationally increased by 250,000+ from 1998 to 1999, due in part to outreach 
and hunter recruitment efforts by state wildlife agencies. Thirty states reported 
increases, and those reporting the largest increases were Arkansas, Washington, South 
Carolina, Wisconsin, Idaho, and South Dakota (Montana's license sales declined). 

Nationally, the total number of fishing licenses, tags, permits and stamps sold in 
all states declined by 2% from 1990 to 2000. However, the number of resident fishing 
licenses/tags/permits/stamps sold in all states declined by 1%, while the number of 
nonresident fishing licenses/tags/permits/stamps sold in all states rose by 14% 
(nonresident sales are 18% of all sales). These figures indicate that an increasing number 
of fishermen and women are traveling out of their home states to fish. 




Whitewater Rafting in Western Montana 



55 million Americans are "Geotourists" 

Seotourism is defined as "tourism that 
sustains or enhances the geographical character 
of the place being visited - its environment, 
culture, aesthetics, heritage, and the well-being 
of its residents. 

Geotourism is environmentally and culturally 
responsible and it seeks to preserve the 
distinctive attributes that make each 
destination a special place to visit.' 

- Study by National Geographic and TIA 




Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



43 



A.15 Tourists Shop 'Til They Drop 



63% of tourists shop while traveling. 



Sidebar 3.1: 

NotiofKil Retail Trends: 

People Coming Bock to Downtowns 

• Downtown use is growing (from 3.4 to 4.4 
trips per month) 

• Generation V & Empty Nesters prefer 
Downtowns 

• Heritoge and cultural travelers prefer 
Downtowns (historic buildings, historic 
walking tours, etc.) 

• 73% of travelers who shop prefer to visit 
stores they do not have in their home city 

• 62% of shopping travelers shop at enclosed 
malls, 53% at downtown districts, 48% at 
strip molls/plazas and 38% at outlet centers 

• In 2001, 56% of Mam Street/Downtown 
districts increased soles: 61% had new 
businesses, 78% increased events, and 27% 
increased housing units - Downtown is making 
a comeback as the 'heart" of the community 

• 50% of all retail purchases in the U.S. art 
made after 5:00 p.m. and on weekends. 

• Percentoge of profits retained in the 
community by types of retail businesses: 

- Superstore discounters: $.06 on the dollar 

- Cham stores: $.20 on the dollar 

- Independent, 'mom & pop' businesses: 
$.60 on the dolkir 

Sources: Notionol AAoin Street Center, TLA. 
Urban land Inftitutc 



■^ 



Shopping is the number one activity of leisure travelers while on vacation: 63% 
of tourists shop while traveling. In fact, half of travelers say that shopping was the 
primary or secondary purpose of one or more trips taken in the past year. One in five 
spent $500 or more on purchases during their trip. They are likely to be Baby Boomers 
(42%) and have higher-than-average household incomes, although one-third (35%) are 
Gen X or Yers (age 18-34), and 23% are Matures (age 55+). 

Most travelers who shop (73%) prefer to visit stores they do not have in their 
home city or town. The most popular place to shop on trips is traditional enclosed 
shopping centers or malls (62%). But major downtown shopping districts or outdoor 
"Main Street" shopping areas are a close second (53%). Slightly less than half (48%) 
shop at strip malls or plazas that are not enclosed, and 38% shop at outlet centers. The 
majority of shoppers want to find items that represent the destination they are visiting; 
however, travelers most often spend money on clothes or shoes for themselves or others 
(77%), rather than on souvenirs. For information about shopping, travelers most often 
turn to people they know, and to hotels where they are staying. 

Challenges & Opportunities for Montana Based on National Tourism Trends 

Challenges 

■ Access : Montana is far removed from major metropolitan areas (1,000+ miles from 
California), so when time for leisure travel is a factor, Montana has a disadvantage. 

■ New markets : Montana has a high rate of repeat visitation, but many travelers are 
looking for destinations where they have never been. Montana needs strategic, 
highly targeted promotions to reach new and desirable customer markets. 

■ Packag in g : Montana is difficult to "buy": its independent businesses and remote 
attractions typically have not worked together to create and market "one call, all- 
inclusive" packages. Specialty/niche products are available, but not highly visible. 

• Image among women : For urban women who plan the family trips, Montana may 
be perceived as too "rugged," "dangerous" or "remote." 

■ Services for Matures : Many Montana facilities/attractions are not designed for 
mature travelers, who have special needs for accessibility, safety, transportation, 
vision (large print menus, signs, etc.), hearing (phones, etc.) and health services. 



44 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Mo^^•ANA Tourism & Recreatkw Stratt-oc Pi.an 2003-2007 



■ Kid-friendly : Montana has few "kid-friendly" facilities/attractions offering pre- 
packaged, age-appropriate activities that are convenient for the whole family. 

■ Heritage & Culture : Montana's historic and cultural treasures are not well known. 

■ Business travel : Business travelers are a small percentage of Montana's travelers. 

■ Meetings & Conventions : Montana's niche in the convention marketplace is not well 
established. 

■ Adventure/sportsmen markets : Montana is an ideal destination for adventure 
travelers and sportsmen; however, these travelers have a big impact on Montana 
residents and their favorite recreational activities and places. 

■ Shopp in g : Montana's variety of shopping is not well publicized; stores in rural areas 
have limited hours, particularly evenings and weekends. 

Opportunities 

Weekend getaways : Nearby metropolitan markets are good targets for packages. 
New customers : Montana's outstanding variety of assets offers exciting options. 
Use of Internet : Montana is an industry leader in innovative Internet marketing. 
Packaging : The tremendous variety of activities/assets offers endless possibilities. 
Women : Montana's "softer side" includes desirable scenery, arts/culture, spas, etc. 
Matures : Spring and fall are ideal travel times for matures, if services are provided. 
Families : Opportunities exist for family camps, packages and organized activities. 
Business travelers : There is potential to extend stays, sell add-on's and attractions. 
Heritage/culture : Montana's treasures are a best-kept secret waiting to be revealed. 
Rural places & festivals : Unique communities and activities abound at every turn. 
Themes : Montana's rich history /geography provides fodder for myriad theme trips. 
Non-business conferences : Montana is an attractive destination for these events. 
Canadians : Montana's northern neighbors travel frequently, love packages/deals. 
Adventure/sportsmen : Guided trips control impacts of adventurers/sportsmen. 
Shopping : Montana has many unique, independent businesses, quality products. 




Fort Peck Theatre 



The next two sections summarize research about Montana's current resident and 
nonresident travelers and trends. The last two sections of this chapter identify 
Montana's niche in the marketplace and top priority target markets, based on 
state/national trends, Montana's assets and opportunities, and its tourism vision and 
goals as stated in Chapter 4. 



MohJTANA Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



45 



Leisure Travel of Montonons 

• 25% take 4* trips/month 

• 30% take 2-3 trips/month 

• 19% take 1 trip/month 

• Peak months are July- Sept. 

• 44% of trips art 1-day in MT 

• 29% art overnights in MT 

• 27% are overnights out of MT 



Montonons spent $707 million on 
leisure trips outside the state in 1999, 
and $255 million on leisure trips within 
the state. Encouraging Montonons to 
travel within their own state keeps 
more 'Montona money" at home. 



Figure 3.1: Montonons' Activity on Most Recent Leisure Trip 

by Seoson 




llSumwiUoWHvoSprhgl 



B. Resident Visitors: Travel Habits of Montanans 

Three-quarters of Montanans take one or more leisure trips annually - a higher 
percentage than the national average.' One-in-four Montanans takes four or more 
leisure trips per month, nearly one-third (30%) take 2-3 trips per month, and about one- 
in-five take one trip per month, for a total of about 9.2 million leisure trips annually. 
Nearly one-third (30%) of Montanans travel annually for business reasons, and sixteen 
percent travel for "other" reasons, such as funerals, medical, relocation, etc. 

Leisure Travel 

The largest share (44%) of Montanans' leisure trips are in-state day trips, 29% are 
in-state overnig ht trips, and about one-in-four trips (27%) are taken out of Montana . In 
1999, Montanans spent about $962 million on leisure travel (9.5% of their annual 
income), and of that, $255 million (27%) was sptent in-state. So while out-of-state trips 
represent only 27% of Montanans' leisure travel, those trips represent 73% of their 
leisure travel spending - over $707 million spent elsewhere. If more Montanans 
vacationed within the state, those dollars would not be exported to other destinations. 
Resident travelers may not bring "new money" to the state, but they keep more 
"Montana money" at home. 

Of the 6.7 million leisure trips that Montanans took in Montana, 
about 60% were day trips, and about 40% were overnights. Children 
participated in about one-third of all leisure trips. The most popular 
activities year-round were: visiting historic/cultural sites and 
interpretive centers, day hiking, attending special events/festivals or 
sports events, nature photography, boating and fishing. Other popular 
seasonal activities were golf, backpacking, off-road vehicles (ORV)/4- 
wheeling and horseback riding in summer; hunting, 4-wheeling, 
backpacking and horseback riding in fall; and skiing, snowboarding, 
snowmobiling and ice fishing in winter (Figure 3.1). 

DAY TRIPS: During their 4.1 million day trips, Montanans spent 
an average of about $20 per trip, for a total of $81 million (primarily on 
gas and restaurant/beverage). The top six reasons (in order) for the day 



46 



' 1999 Resident Traveler Study, University of Montana 

Ci lAPTER 3: Markets Montana Tourism & Recreatkw Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



trips were: visiting friends and relatives (VFR), rest and relaxation (R&R), shopping, 
sightseeing, entertainment and recreation (Table 3.1). Those who traveled for shopping 
spent the most money ($185/trip), followed by those who traveled for class reunions 
($90), R&R ($30), recreation ($28), sightseeing ($25) and entertainment ($17). Average 
daily expenditures for other activities were $15 or less. The top ten activities in which 
Montanans participated while on day trips were: visiting historic/cultural 
sites/interpretive centers, day hiking, nature photography, attending a special 
event/festival, fishing, attending or participating in a sporting event, boating/water 
sports, hunting, backpacking and 4-wheeling (Figure 3.2). The majority of the day trips 
took place in summer (61%), but nearly one-quarter (23%) were in fall (probably due to 
hunting), 14% were in winter and 3% in spring. 

OVERNIGHT TRIPS: During their 2.7 million overnight trips in Montana, 
residents spent an average of 2-3 nights away from home. Their expenditures were 
about $65 per trip, for a total of $174 million, primarily on gas, restaurant/beverage, 
groceries and lodging (although 60% of groups spent no money on lodging because they 
stayed with friends/relatives or in an RV or tent). The top five reasons (in order) for 
overnight trips were: VFR, R&R, recreation, entertainment and sightseeing (Table 3.1). 
Similar to day trips, those who traveled for shopping spent the most money ($383/trip), 
followed by combined reasons ($199), class reunions ($152), entertainment ($147), 
sightseeing ($146), "other" reasons ($113) and recreation ($110). Average trip 
expenditures for other overnight trips were less than $100. 

The top ten activities in which Montanans participated during 
their overnight trip were: day hiking, visiting historic/cultural sites or 
interpretive centers, nature photography, fishing, sporting events, 
boating/water sports, special event/festival, 4-wheeling, backpacking 
and hunting (Figure 3.2). Nearly two-thirds (64%) of overnight trips 
took place in summer, while 21% were in fall, 11% in winter and 4% in 
spring. One-third of the overnight stays were spent in hotels, bed & 
breakfast inns or resorts, while 29% were spent in the home of a 
friend/relative and 29% in an RV or tent (Figure 3.3 next page). The 
study report did not provide further details about the demographic 
characteristics of participants in various trip activities (e.g., which 
traveler types stayed in hotels, which took longer trips, etc.). 



Table 3.1: Reasons for Montanans' | 


1 


Leisure Travel ( 


in Rank Order) 


! 


Dav Trips in MT 


Overnioht Trips m MT 


1 


VFR 


VFR 


i 


MH 


R&R 


i 


Shopping 


Recreation n 


Sightseeing 


Entertainment [ 


Entertainment 


Sightseeing 


1 


Recreation 


Combination 


1 


Combination 


Family Event 


1 


Family Event 


Avoiding Winter 


1 


Special Event 


Shopping 


1 


Avoiding Winter 


Special Event 


1 


Other 


Other 


1 


Class Reunion 


Class Reunion 


i 



Figure 3.2: Leisure Trip Activities of Montanans by Trip 
Type (7o of Groups Participating) 




lU 



cS- 






f I .^ 






■r I- .g 



o 



° i y 



.§ 



I Day Trip ■ CXemlght In MfT D Overnight out of MT 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



47 



Figure 3.3: Accommodations Used for 

Montonons' Overnight Trips in Montana 

(% of Nights Spent in Each) 



RVlTent 
29% 


Hotel 
23% 








BAB 






2 3% 


VFR Home 
29H 


Other 
9% 


Resort 
7% 



To serve A^ontonons, tourism and 
recreation providers need to 
occommodote older - and larger numbers 
of - visitors, mointain of fordability of 
recreation, and preserve access to 
recreation assets (a tall order in a world 
of limited budgets). 



Resident and nonresident visitation 
trends at Montana attractions could not 
be compored because data about the 
ratio of residents vs. nonresident 
visitors IMS not available. 



Business Travel 

Nearly one-third of Montanans travel for business annually: 9% took three or 
more business trips per month, 6% took two business trips per month and 14% took one 
business trip per month. The peak month for business travel was September, followed 
by December, August and February, and then January and October. Further details 
about business travel were not part of the 1999 Resident Traveler study. 

Other Travel 

About sixteen percent of Montana households participated in "other" types of 
travel annually (funerals, medical, relocation, etc.): 5% took four or more trips per 
month, 6% took 2-3 trips per month, and 6% took one trip per month. The peak months 
for this type of travel were November, February, August and September. Further details 
about "other" travel were not part of the 1999 Resident Traveler study. 

Implications 

The population of Montana is growing, and growing older: Baby Boomers and 
retirees make up 38% of Montana's population. Low wages require many Montanans to 
hold multiple jobs, cutting into their leisure time and expenditures. Activities with the 
highest potential for capturing more in-state leisure travel spending from Montanans 
appear to be in the categories of historical/cultural travel, special events/ festivals, 
enhanced or packaged outdoor recreation for couples and families, and possibly 
additional activities during family-related and business trips. 

Public input obtained by the planning team indicated that affordable access to 
outdoor recreation assets is a top priority among Montanans for hiking, fishing, hunting, 
boating and 4-wheeling. 



48 



CnArrER3: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



C. Nonresident Visitors: Current Traveler Profile 

Montana is fortunate to possess a great deal of research about nonresident 
travelers to the state. The University of Montana (UM) in Missoula has an Institute 
for Tourism and Recreation Research (ITRR) which coordinates and disseminates the 
results of its annual research. Additionally, ITRR has collaborated with the UM 
Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER), also in Missoula, on previous 
statewide studies. This section provides an overview of key research findings and 
trends from several sources, as reviewed and analyzed by the planning team. It is not 
intended to be a comprehensive analysis, due to the overwhelming volume of data 
available and the limits of time and space in this document. Instead, it provides key 
information that pertains to the objectives and actions proposed in this Strategic Plan, 
and to on-the-ground issues for tourism and recreation stakeholders across the state. 
A complete list of research references for further information is included in Appendix 
C. ITRR research publications can be accessed on the web at 
www.forestry.umt.edu/itrr. 

C.1 The Origin of Montana's Nonresident Visitors Has Changed Slightly 

In 2001, approximately 9.6 million nonresident tourists visited Montana, and 
spent $1.7 billion in the state. About 5.7 million nonresident travelers came in the 
summer (June-September), about 1.9 million came in winter (December-March), 
about 1.1 million came in spring (April-May) and 995,502 came in fall (October- 
November). Those visitors came primarily from the following nine states and one 
province (listed in order): Washington, North Dakota, Wyoming, Idaho, California, 
Alberta (Canada), Minnesota, Colorado, Oregon and Utah (Table 3.2). 

These nine states are the same ones that appeared at the top of the list in the 
1996 ITRR study of summer nonresident travelers in Montana, and in the 1995-96 
American Travel Survey, which reported on U.S. travelers from other states who visited 
Montana as their primary destination. The order of the nine states changed slightly in 
each study: in the ATS study, Wyoming was the top state of origin, but pass-through 
travelers were not included in the data; the ITRR study included only summer travelers, 
and reported that it likely undercounted day-trip travelers from Wyoming. 



Tabic 3.2: Origin of 2001 Nonresident Visitors 


Place of 
Residence 


Winter 

Dec-Mar 


Spring 

Apr-May 


Summer 

Jun-Sept 


Fall 

Oct-Nov 


Total # of Srps 


801,562 


579,300 


2,267,140 


432,827 


Alberta, CAN 


7% 


5% 


4% 


7% 


Arizona 


2% 


<1% 


3% 


0% 


British Columbia 


2% 


2% 


2% 


0% 


California 


3% 


5% 


10% 


6% 


Colorado 


6X 


2% 


4% 


3% 


Florida 


<1% 


<1% 


3% 


0% 


Idaho 


3% 


10% 


6% 


10% 


Michigan 


<1% 


4% 


2% 


2% 


Minnesota 


5% 


5% 


5% 


5% 


New York 


<1% 


4% 


2% 


0% 


North Dakota 


22% 


9% 


4% 


8% 


Oregon 


3% 


4% 


4% 


4% 


Saskatchewan 


3% 


<1% 


1% 


0% 


South Dakota 


3% 


2% 


1% 


0% 


Texas 


3% 


2% 


3% 


3% 


Utah 


<1% 


2% 


4% 


5% 


Washington 


8% 


12% 


12% 


14% 


Wisconsin 


<1% 


8% 


2% 


0% 


Wyoming 


17% 


7% 


4% 


7% 


Other Western 


<1% 


4% 


5% 


2% 


Other MW/East 


2*% 


2*% 


IQ*X 


2% 


Overseas 


<1% 


«1% 


3% 


0% 



Source: ITRR Nonresident Visitor Study Reports 
2001-7, 2002-2, 2002-5, 2002-8. 



Montana Tourism & Rkcreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



49 



Table 3.3: 


kt 


Top 10 States of Origin 


of Montana g 


Nonresident Visitors 


In 2001 1 


5tflt?/Pr9vin« 


# Trove! 6rouDS R 


Woshington 


466.000 1 


Ktorth Oakoto 


354,000 1 


California 


306.000 g 


Wyoming 


297,000 E 


Idaho 


261,000 1 


Alberto. CAN 


206,000 


Minnesota 


204,000 


Colorado 


163,000 




155,000 


ytoh 


124,000 


Other Ploces of Orwin 




All other states 




in Table 3.2 


ea. 58-108,000 


Other Midwestern 




A Eastern states 


490,000 


Ottrxas 




(down from previous yrs) 


68,000 



However, the most significant changes in geographic origins of nonresident 
visitors to Montana are seasonal. Winter visitation from Washington declined nearly 
50% in the last decade; while visitation from North Dakota and Wyoming increased 
from 10% of all travelers in 1993 to 397o in 2001. A new trend in spring was the 
emergence of Wisconsin visitors in relatively large numbers. Another change in 2001 
was the emergence of Alberta in the top ten list (ranked sixth), representing 7% each of 
fall and winter, 5% of spring, and 4% of summer visitors (Table 3.3). After several years 
of declining visitation from Canada due to exchange rates, Montana's neighbors to the 
north appear to be coming back (this is consistent with national trends). The overall 
level of visitors from WA, CA and ID remained constant. 

As Table 3.2 on the previous page shows, visitors from the nearby states and 
provinces (ND, SD, WY, CO, UT, ID, OR, WA, BriHsh Columbia, Alberta and 
Saskatchewan) make up nearly three-quarters (74%) of winter visitors, 55% of spring 
visitors, 46% of summer visitors, and 44% of fall visitors. Other western states make up 
about 9% of winter visitors, 12% of spring visitors, 1% of fall visitors, and 21% of 
summer visitors (especially California, Arizona and Texas). Midwestern and eastern 
states, and overseas visitors, make up 11% of winter visitors, 24% of spring visitors, 1% 
of fall visitors, and about one-third (32%) of summer visitors. Since visitor origins are 
reported by state of origin, and not by zip code, it could not be determined whether 
some major cross-state metropolitan areas may be key sources of visitors (such as the 
New York City metro area, encompassing NY, NJ, PA & CT). 

Canadians represent about 12% of Montana's winter visitors, 7% of spring 
visitors, 8% of summer visitors and 9% of fall visitors. In summer, the percentage of 
Canadians increased from 7% of all travelers in 1996 to 8% in 2001. In real numbers, that 
is about 153,000 Canadian travel groups in 1996, and 181,000 in 2001. Meanwhile, the 
percentage of overseas travelers in summer declined from 1996 levels, from 5% of all 
travelers to 3% (109,000 overseas travel groups in summer 1996, and 68,000 in 2001). 
According to the Travel Industry Association (TIA), exchange rates (the strong U.S. 
dollar) have negatively impacted international travel to the U.S. during this 1996-2001 
time period. 



50 



Chapter 3: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Rkcreation Strategic Pijvn 2003-2007 



Travelers from Top Four States are Very Different 

Sidebar 3.2 summarizes results of the 1995 American Travel Survey, which detailed 
characteristics of destination travelers to Montana from four key states. 



Sidebar 3.2: Destination Travelers to Montana from 4 Key States (1995 ATS Survey Results) 



Travelers from Washington 

• 402.000 jDerson-trips to Montana 
« Half VFR, 24% Vacation, 12% Biz 

■ 56% from Seattle metro area; 31% 
from SpKikane area (estim.) 

■ Income: 

<$40k $40-$60k $60k+ 
37% 25% 39% 

• Average age 30 

<30 30-49 50-64 65+ 
44% 39% 12% 5% 

■ Group size 2.2: 53% adults only, 
42% with kids 

■ 35% high school education, 

40% some college, 26% bacheIors+ 

■ Half came in Jul-Sep, 25% in Apr- 
Jua 21% Oct-Dec, 9% Jan-Mar 

• Average length of stay: 5.1 nights 
Onts 1-3 nts 4-7 nts 8+ nts 
13% 34% 39% 14% 

• More than half (57%) stay in VFR 
home (5.2 nts), only 20% stay in 
hotel (3.7 nts), 22% other 

• 10% flew to Montana 

• Other state destinations (MT was 
5*): OR (37%), CA (16%), ID (8%), 
NV (7%), MT (4%) 

Key Findings: WA Travelers 

" Many were college students 

• Young (80% under 50) 

• 60% make less than $60,000 

• VFR most common trip purpxjse 

• Many skiers in Seattle area - promo 
of direct flights may draw more 



Travelers from California 

• 533.000 person-trips to Montana 

■ Nearly all leisure travelers (96%) 

■ 2% Business, 2% VFR, none w/ kids 

• Income: 

<$40k $40-$60k $60k+ 
20% 21% 61% 

■ Average age 46 

<30 30-49 50-64 65+ 
20% 69% 0% 12% 

■ Group size: 1 .9 people 

• 39% high school education, 

12% some college, 49% bachelors* 

■ 38% came Jul-Sep, 30% Apr-Jun, 
27% Jan-Mar, 6% Oct-Dec 

■ Average length of stay: n/a 
Onts 1-3 nts 4-7 nts 8-t- nts 

0% 23% 55% 23% 

■ 73% stay in hotel/resort (4.2 nts), 
25% other, 2% VFR 

• 56% flew to Montana 

• Other state destinations (MT was 
14*): NV (40%), AZ (10%), HI (4%), 
NY (4%), CO (4%), MT (1%) 

Key Findings: CA Travelers 

■ Nearly all leisure travelers, no kids 

• 3/4 stay 4+ nights; more than half fly 
" Middle age, well educated, affluent 

■ More than 1/4 came in winter (ski?) 

■ Most stay in hotels/resorts - longer 
stays in commercial lodging 

■ Vacation most aimmon trip purpose 

■ Packages, direct flights may attract 
more (note heavy travel to NV) 



Travelers from Idaho 

• 297,000 (>erson-trips to Montana 

■ Most traveled to western Montana 
- 41% Vacation , 26% Biz, 21% VFR 

■ Income: 

<$40k $40-$60k $60k+ 
39% 35% 27% 

■ Average age 39 

<30 30-49 50-64 65+ 
32% 55% 10% 3% 

■ Group size: 2.2 people, 68% adults 
only, 29% w/ kids 

■ 36% high school education, 

30% some college, 34% bachelors* 

■ One-third came Jul-Sep, one-third 
Apr-Jun (2/3 come Apr-Sep), 20% 
Jan-Mar, 12% Oct-Dec 

• Average length of stay: 3.2 nights 
Onts 1-3 nts 4-7 nts 8+ nts 
27% 42% 25% 5% 

■ 41% stay in VFR home (3.8 nts), 31% 
in hotel/resort (2.1 nts), 27% other 
(RV, camping, etc.) 

■ Other state destinations (MT was 
5"'): UT (27%), WA (20%), OR 
(12%), CA (9%), MT (8%) 

Key Findings: ID Travelers 

■ Many are business travelers (short 
stays, mid-upper income); fewer in 
Jul-Sep; 27% day-trippers 

• Older than Washingtonians 

■ Could attract more wcHjkend 
getaways from short distance 



Travelers from Wyoming 

• 657.000 person-trips to Montana 

■ Majority day-trippers (58%) 

■ HalfVacationers, 20%"Other", 19% 
Biz, 14% VFR 

• Trips spread throughout year (29% 
Oct-Dec: Xmas shopping in Billings) 

■ Income: 

<$40k $40-$60k $60k+ 
56% 34% 10% 

• Average age 40 

<3Q 20:49 5Q:M 65+ 
28% 41% 18% 13% 

• Group size: 2.2 people, 71% adults 
only, 28% w/kids 

• 46% high school educatioa 

24% some college, 33% bachelors* 

• Average length of stay: 2.3 nights 
Onts 1-3 nts 4-7 nts 8+ nts 
58% 34% 7% 1% 

• Half stay in VFR home (2.4 nts), 40% 
in hotel/resort (1.8 nts), 9% other 
(RV, camping, etc.) 

• Other state destinations (MT was 
2~'): CO (29%), MT (28%), SD (9%), 
UT (9%), NE (4%) 

Key Findings: WY Travelers 

■ Many came in Oct-Dec (Xmas 
shopping in Billings, day trif>s) 

■ Least affluent of 4 states, 1/3 over 50 

■ Most Wyomingites stay close to 
home (travel to adjacent states) 

• Packages and "last minute" deals 
may increase stays/spending 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi^n 2003-2007 



Chapter 3: Markets 



51 



Sidebar 3.3: 
Winter Trends: 2001 vs. 1993/1998 

More business, vacation & pass-thru travelers in 

2CX}1 than in 1998 

16% are VFR in 2001 (vs. 30-36% in 1993/98) 

95% repeat visitors in 2001 

Spending: 1993: $313/trip. 1998: $228/trip, 

2001: $341/trip 

/More couples, slightly more family groups 

(mostly pass-through) in 2001 

Increasing visitors from ND. WY, CO. -ALB. MN 

Decreosino visitors from WA, ID 

Fewer visitors "attracted by' open space/ 

uncrowded. mountains/forests, rivers/lakes, 

plains, wildlife. National Parks in 2001 

Increasing : shopping, visits to history/LAC 

Sites. Glacier NP 

Some level : hiking, fishing, events 

Decreasing : wildlife viewing, gaming, visiting t! 

museums, skiing, snowmobiling (winter 2001 was 

a bad snow year) 

More use of Internet, businesses to pkin trips 

Less use of auto clubs, 800#'s, guidebooks & 

travel agencies to pkin trips 

Implicotions : 



More visitors from nearby states, fewer from 

further away - shorter trips 

Outdoor attractions less of a factor; more 

interest in history/ culture 

Less spending on activities 



C.2 Seasonal Analysis Shows Mixed Trends, Key Declines in Spending 

The ITRR 2000-2001 nonresident traveler studies collected seasonal information 
about the purposes of visitors' trips: vacation, visiting friends/relatives, business or just 
passing through. They also collected information about travel party size and 
composition, household income, travel modes, activities, sites visited, expenditures, 
satisfaction levels and trip planning methods. The sections below summarize the survey 
findings related to visitor characteristics by season. 

Winter 

There were 801,562 nonresident travel groups during the 20(K)-2001 winter (Dec- 
Mar, Table 3.2), and they spent nearly $337 million in Montana, or an average of $341 
per trip. The number of visitor groups increased 31% from 1998 to 2(X)1, and total 
expenditures increased by 40% (daily spending increased by $15, or 16%), which was a 
significant recovery after a 24% decline from 1993-1998. But in 2001, spending on 
entrance fees, outfitter/guide and miscellaneous services declined 39%, indicating less 
activity participation. The "typical" winter visitor group consisted of 2.4 people, spent 
$111 per day, stayed 3.1 nights, and had a household income of $60,000-$80,000. Neariy 
all visitors had been to Montana before and planned to return within two years (95%+). 
Almost two-thirds were couples or singles - only 18% were traveling with children, and 
most of those were passing through. Thirty-nine percent of winter visitors came from 
North Dakota and Wyoming. About one-in-five (22%) flew for a portion of their trip. 

When asked about their primary trip purpose, nearly one-third of winter visitors 
were just passing through Montana on the way to somewhere else, 237o were 
vacationing in Montana, 18% were traveling for business reasons, and 16% were visiting 
friends and relatives (VFR), many of them coming for the holidays. Business and 
vacation travelers were the most affluent groups: 56% of vacationers and 40% of 
business travelers had household incomes of $80,000+ (versus 21% of VFR and 31% of 
pass-through travelers). The most frequently cited activity of visitors while in Montana 
was shopping (41%), followed by wildlife viewing (17% - down from 24% in 1998), 
downhill skiing, day hiking and gambling (12% ea.). Interest in historic and cultural 
activities increased since the 1998 winter study. Less than 15% of winter nonresident 
travelers visited Yellowstone Park, the Flathead Lake area. Glacier Park or the Little 
Bighorn Battlefield, although visits to Glacier Park increased from 1993. Statewide, 
participation in downhill skiing and snowmobiling declined from 1998 to 2001, but Big 



52 



CHATTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Rhckeation Strategic Pi.an 2003-2007 



Sky skier days rose 6.5%, and the number of snowmobilers in Yellowstone National 
Park rose 14% during this time period (from Dec-Mar, 1998 to 2001). 

Spring 

During the spring (Apr-May) of 2001, there were 579,300 nonresident travel 
groups, and they spent $169 million in Montana, or $292 per trip (vs. $341 in winter, 
$460 in summer). The "typical" spring visitor spent less money ($96/day), stayed a 
shorter time period (3 nights), had a smaller travel group (2 people) and was less 
affluent (income of $40-$60,000) than the typical winter visitor. Fewer had been to 
Montana before and planned to visit again within two years (81-87%). 

Nearly half of spring travelers were just passing through Montana on the way to 
somewhere else. About one-quarter were vacationing in Montana, while 14% were VFR 
and 11% were business travelers. More than two-thirds were couples or singles - only 
10% were traveling with children, and most of those were VFR. Only 16% came from 
North DakotaA'Vyoming (vs. 39% in winter), while 22% came from Washington and 
Idaho (double the percentage in winter). Nearly one-in-five (19%) were from the 
Midwest, versus only 5% from Minnesota in winter. Visitors from Alberta and Colorado 
represented smaller percentages of spring travelers than in winter, while the percentage 
of visitors from California, Oregon and New York increased in spring. 

As in winter, business and vacation travelers were the most affluent (45% of 
business travelers and 31% of vacationers had incomes over $80,000, versus 27% of pass- 
through and 19% of VFR). One-quarter of spring travelers visited Yellowstone Park, 
while Glacier Park and Little Bighorn each were visited by 19% of travelers. Fewer 
spring visitors went shopping than winter visitors (27%), but more visited historic sites 
(22%). Ten to fifteen percent of spring travelers went camping, day hiking, wildlife 
viewing and picnicking. 

Summer 

There were a total of 2,267,140 nonresident travel groups visiting Montana in 
summer 2001 (June through September), and they spent more than $1 billion in the state, 
or $460 per trip (vs. $490 per trip in 1996). The total number of summer visitors 
decreased by 21,000 since 1996 and total expenditures decreased by 3% (-$28.5 million), 
because length of stay and group size decreased. The "typical" summer group consisted 
of 2.5 people (larger than winter or spring), spent $110 per day (more than spring 



Sidebar 3.4: 
Spring Travelers in 2001 

(bata not available for trends comparison.) 

■ Nearly half were pass-thru, 23% vacation 

■ 80% repeat visitors 

■ Shorter stays, lower spending & smaller 
travel groups than winter or summer 

■ Few (10%) had kids along (most were VFR) 

■ Key markets are- WA, ID, Midwest (esp. 
WI, MN), ND, WY, ALB, CA 

• Interest in history/culture, Nat'! Porks 

Implications : 

■ Need VICs, services to capture pass-thru 

• Specialty packages focusing on heritage/ 
culture and Nat'l Parks could draw more 
visitors or extend stays 




St. Mary Lake, Glacier National Park 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



53 



Sidebar 3.5: 

Summer Trends: 2001 vs. 1996 

■ Holf of trovelers ore prinvjrily vocotioning 

• IncreQ5inq vacationers, biz travelers, couples 

• Some level - overall number of visitors, pass- 
thru travelers, shoppers 

• Decreasing : length of stay, group size, total 
spending, singles, families with kids, VFR 

• 75% repeat visitors 

• Spending : $490/trip in 1996. $460/trip in "Ol 

• More visitors from CA, MN. ^LB, B.C., PA. NY, 
6A.FL 

• Some% from ID, Oft, UT, ND, TX, IL, MI, WI 

• Fewer from WA, WV, CO. AZ. NV, overseas 

• More flew and rented cars (time crunch) 

• Slightly more "attracted by' open space/ 
uncrowded: fewer 'attracted by' mountains/ 
forests, rivers/lakes, wildlife, 6kicier Park 

• Increased visitotion to historic/LAC sites, 
shopping, hiking, nature study, cultural 
activities, picnicking, golf, fishing, rafting 

• Decreasing : wildlife viewing, camping, gaming 

• More : use of Internet, chambers/CVBs and 
businesses to pkin trips 

• Less : use of auto clubs, 800#, MT Travel 
Pkjnner, Nkitionol Park info 4 guidebooks 

• Useful during trip: highway signs, VlCs, 
brochure racks, front-line service persons 

Implications : 

• Overall revenue per tourist declining 

• Fewer families 4 VFR travelers, more couples 

• More interest in passive outdoor and cerebral 
octivities (history/culture), less interest in 
"roughing it'/scenery/wildhfe only 

• N4eed packages/activities for urban couples, 
families with kids, "fresh* appeal of attractions 
(Notional Porks) to repeat visitors. 



visitors but slightly less than winter visitors), stayed 4.2 nights (one day longer than 
winter or spring), and had a household income of $40-$60,000 (similar to spring, lower 
than winter traveler). 

About three-quarters of summer travelers had been to Montana before, and 
planned to return within two years. More than half (55%) were singles or couples, but 
couples were 41% of all summer travelers (up from 38% in 1996). One-quarter of 
summer visitors were traveling with children, a decrease from 1996. More than one-in- 
four came from Washington, Idaho, Wyoming and the Dakotas, while 13% came from 
other nearby states (UT, OR, CO, NV). Ten percent were from California, 17% from the 
Midwest, 8% from the southwest (AZ, TX, NM, OK), 16% from the east/southeast, 8% 
were from Canada and 3% from overseas (down from 5% in 1996). 

The primary trip purpose was vacation for half of summer travelers, while 21% 
were just passing through, 15% were visiting friends/relatives and 7% were traveling on 
business. Business travelers and vacationers were most affluent, as 42% of business 
travelers and 35% of vacationers had household incomes of $80,000+ (versus 26% of VFR 
and 24% of pass-through travelers). Nearly half of summer travelers visited 
Yellowstone Park, one-third visited Glacier Park, 14% visited Little Bighorn and 7% 
visited the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center. About one-third of summer travelers 
enjoyed shopping, wildlife viewing and day hiking, while one-in-four enjoyed 
picnicking, visiting historic sites and camping, and about one-in-five enjoyed museums, 
fishing and visiting Lewis & Clark/American Indian sites. Fewer than 10% of 
nonresident summer travelers participated in gaming, golf or rafting. 

Fall 

The fall study (Oct-Nov 2001) of nonresident travelers had less data available 
than the other three seasonal studies due to smaller sample size (after September ll* 
travel restrictions), and could not be compared to the 1993 fall three-month (Sept, Oct, 
Nov) travel study for analysis. There were 432,827 fall nonresident travel groups, 
almost half of which were couples (42%), one-quarter were singles, and 21% were 
families. Only 10% were traveling with children. The "typical" fall travel group 
consisted of 2.03 people and stayed 3.94 nights in Montana. Most fall travelers were 
repeat visitors (89%), and almost all (94%) plan to return within two years. Eleven 
percent flew and/or rented a car while on their trip. Slightly more than half had 



54 



CHAfTF.RS; Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



household incomes of less than $60,000. Although one-quarter of all fall travelers, and 
39% of vacationers, earned $100,000+, more than any other season. 

One-third of fall travelers were merely passing through, 29% were on vacation, 
one-quarter were VFR, 7% were business travelers, and 4% each were shopping/other. 
Vacationers stayed five nights, half the time in hotels; VFRs stayed 6.5 nights, mostly in 
private homes (65%). Pass-thru travelers stayed only 1.5 nights. Fall visitors enjoyed 
shopping (34%), wildlife watching (22%), hunting (17%), day hiking (16%) and fishing 
(13%). Vacationers' primary purpose in visiting Montana in the fall was shopping or 
hunting. Almost half (43%) of all vacationers hunted, and 15% hired an outfitter. 

Visitors originated from WA (14%), ID (10%), ND (8%), WY and ALB (7% each), 
CA (6%), MI and UT (5% each), OR (4%), CO and TX (3% each) MN, NV and PA (2% 
each). Comparison -figures from Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks indicate the top states 
of origin for nonresident big game hunters (primarily fall visitors) are the following: 
WA, ND, CA, MN, WI, PA, MI, TX, OR, NY, FL, and OH. 

Summary of Seasonal Trends 

The following is a summary of seasonal traveler trends and differences: 
" In summer, half of travelers are vacationers, an increase since 1996. One-in-five is 
pass-through (unchanged since 1996, and a lower proportion than spring, fall or 
winter). About 15% are VFR - a decline from 1996, and about the same proportion 
as in spring and winter, but much lower than fall (23%). 

■ In winter, one-third of travelers are VFR, 29% are pass-through, 23% are 
vacationers, and 18% of travelers are business travelers. 

■ In spring , nearly half of travelers are pass-thru, and 23% are vacationers. Spring 
travelers have the smallest groups, shortest stays and lowest spending. 

■ In fall, one-third of travelers are pass-thru (34%), 29% are vacationers, 23% VFR. 
Fall vacationers are affluent, and like to hunt and shop. 

■ Except in summer, two-thirds of travelers are couples/singles. In summer, 25% have 
kids along (versus 10% in spring or fall, 18% in winter). 

• Overall spending declined in summer due to declines in trip length and group size 
as travelers have smaller families and less leisure time. Summer travelers have the 
largest travel groups and stay longest, but winter travelers spend more per day. 



Sidebar 3.6: 
Internet Conversion Study Results 

Conversion study measured influence of MonTono 

www.vlsltnDt.com web site on visitor conversion and 

economic impact 

2,120 visitors to visitmt.com site were contacted in 

Nov-Dec 2001: 33% survey completion rate 

'Well-connected' web users: 92% hove home 

access: 60% workplace access 

Web search timing: 2* months before travel 

(68%), 1-2 months (24%). 4 wks or less (8%) 

Nearly three-quarters (73%) revisit travel web 

site more than once a month 

10% were directly influenced to visit: almost half 

were somewhat influenced 

Web site helped generate 18,000 trips to MT 

Site-Influenced visitors spent over $39 million in 

state; ROI approx. $28 for eoch $1 spent by MT 

Internet not a substitute for print materials: 

about half used phone/moil for addt'l info 

Visitor profile: 2.9 per party, 30% with children 

Half visit in summer, 19% fall, 12% spring. 6% 

winter 

Economic impact: 7 night stay, avg. $300/day 

Trip experience: 93% satisfaction, 84% very likely 

to return within 2 yrs 

Visitor Image of Montana: history, 

outdoors/nature, getaway, adventure 

L&C sites need promotion to Increase awareness of 

MT sites 

States of origin: W^, CA, MN, MT, IL, WI, OR, 

TX.FL 

Implicotions 

Highlight new features/attractions to Increase 

repeat visitation 

Promote each season in advance 

Regularly monitor search engine links 

Continue to promote web address in print 

Source: DOC 2001 Internet Conversion Research Iteport 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



55 




Western Heritoge Days, Gront-Kohrs Ranch 



While national trends show that family 
trovel is up, the percentage of families 
coming to Montana has declined. 



Table 3.4: 


Primary Trip Purpose of Nonresident Visitors 


btsan 


y/mv 


£a!! 


Ssrm 


5«nim?r 


Totol 


VantiaN 


23X 


29% 


23% 


92% 


41% 


No. of firoup* 


184,380 


125.520 


133,239 


1,178,913 


1,496,511 


VW 


32% 


23% 


14% 


15% 


19% 


No.of 6raup> 


256,900 


99,550 


81,102 


340,071 


677,673 


■utiMM 


18X 


7% 


11% 


7% 


10% 


No. of Groups 


144,281 


30,298 


63,723 


158,700 


366,704 


Pan-Tlwwgh 


29% 


34% 


47% 


21% 


27% 


No. of Group* 


232,453 


147,161 


272,271 


476,099 


980.823 


Totol Croupt 


801,562 


432,827 


579,300 


2,267,140 


3,648,002 



* Visiting Fricnds/Rclotives 
Source: ITRR Nonreiident Visitor Study Ref)orts 
2001-7. 2002-2. 2002-5. 2002-8 



■ Washingtonians are the largest group (12%) traveling to Montana, as a percent of 
all visitors, but their prop>ortion has declined. Visitation from North Dakota and 
Wyoming has increased in winter, and remained stable in summer. More 
Califomians and Midwestemers are coming in summer, while numbers of Idahoans 
and Wisconsinites increased in spring (visitation from Idahoans is stable in summer). 
Canadians make their strongest showing in winter and spring. 

■ Yellowstone and Glacier Parks are still the most visited sites in all seasons. 
Flathead Lake and Little Bighorn Battlefield are second in year-round popularity. 

■ Interest in heritage/cultural attractions has grown in all three seasons. Shopping, 
wildlife watching and hiking are the most frequent primary activities in all seasons. 
Active outdoor recreation (camping, skiing, snowmobiling) seems to have declined - 
though weather could be a factor - while passive outdoor activities (golf, fishing, 
picnicking) increased. Perhaps this is a result of Baby Boomers comprising an 
increasing portion of the traveler market. 

C.3 Half of 2001 Nonresident Visitors had Shorter Stays, Spent Less than 1996/98 

The ITRR nonresident visitor research identified travelers by their "primary" and 
"other" trip purposes. The paragraphs below describe the characteristics of the four 
major traveler types (vacationers, pass-through, VFR, and business), based on those who 
chose the type as their "primary" trip purf)ose. 

Vacationers 

Vacationers represented half of Montana's nonresident 
travelers in summer, and about one quarter of travelers in winter, 
spring and fall. In winter, nearly half of them also were visiting 
friends or relatives - many of them over the holidays (which links to 
887o being repeat visitors). Eleven percent of winter vacationers also 
cited shopping as a reason for their trip - not surprising since 43% of 
winter vacationers came from North Dakota and Wyoming, two key 
markets for retail businesses in Billings. In fall, 35% of vacationers 
were visiting friends or relatives; while in spring and summer, less 
than 20% were. Nearly ha4f of winter and summer vacationers were 
couples (56% in spring, 33% in fall). Few were traveling alone in 



56 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Rf.ctieath>n Strateqc PXMi 2003-2007 



summer, compared to spring (17% singles), and fall (23%). In summer, about one- 
third were traveling with family (29% brought children), while in fall and winter, 
only 15-16% brought kids. This trend is a bit surprising, since national trends 
indicate that family travel is increasing, but in Montana, it declined from 1996 to 
2001. This may indicate an opportunity and a need for Montana tourism partners to 
package and market more family trips. 

North Dakotans represented one-third of winter vacationers and 7% in the 
fall, yet they were less than 1% of vacationers in spring and only 3% in summer. 
VICs report they are shopping, skiing and snowmobiling in Montana. Washington 
was the top state of origin for vacationers in spring (18%) and fall (13%), second in 
summer (9%), but tied for seventh with New York and Colorado in winter (3%) - a 
big drop from 1996. Further investigation about Washingtonians may reveal the 
reason for the decline, since they clearly still are a major market for Montana in other 
seasons (they top the list of nonresident fishing license purchasers). The Midwest 
also is a key market for vacationers (particularly MN, WI, MI, IL and OH), as is the 
southwest (CO, TX, AZ). California is the top summer market, second in fall, third 
in spring, fifth in winter. In summer. Alberta is third and Utah fourth. In spring, 
Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Virginia emerged as markets. In fall, 5% of 
vacationers come from Alberta, Minnesota, Oregon and Idaho. 

Vacationers were the second most affluent type of visitors to Montana 
(behind business travelers), particularly in winter (most likely destination skiers and 
snowmobilers) and fall (hunters): more than half earned $80,000+, more than a third 
$100,000+. In spring and summer, about one-third earned $80,000+. Winter and 
spring vacationers spent about 3.6 nights in Montana, while in summer, they stayed 
4.6 nights, and in fall 5 nights (hunters tend to stay longer). 

In winter, one-third of vacationers were skiers, and about 10% each were 
snowboarders, snowshoers and snowmobilers. Shopping, hiking, wildlife viewing 
and festivals/events also were popular. In spring and summer, the top activities 
were visiting historical/cultural sites, hiking, shopping, camping, wildlife viewing 
and picnicking. In fall, the most popular activities were hunting, shopping, wildlife 
viewing and fishing. In summer, 9% of vacationers used an outfitter during their 
trip and 15% did in fall. In 2001, Yellowstone Park was visited by half of spring 
vacationers, and one-third of summer, fall and winter vacationers. Glacier Park was 



Sidebar 3.7: 
Vacationer Characteristics by Season 

• Half are couples: about 1/3 ore families in summer 

• Repeat visitation: 70%. summer, 887o winter 

• More affluent (esp. winter) than VFR or pass-thru 

• Family travel declining (29% w/kids in summer) 

• Spring/summer activities: history/culture, hiking, 
shopping, wildlife 

■ Used Internet, auto clubs, national pork brochures/MT 
Travel Planner to plan trips 

■ Useful during trip: front-line service, VICs, brochure 
racks, and highway signs 

Summer 

• 52% of all travelers: 1/2 couples, 1/3 families 

• Key Markets: CA, WA, ALB, UT, OR, CO, Midwest, 
Southwest, Europe, FL, SA, NY, MD, PA, BC 

■ Average length of stay: 4.6 nights 

• Attrocfns: 1/3 visited YNP, 1/4 SNP, 13% Fkitheod Lake, 
37o Little Bighorn, 9% hired an outfitter 

Winter 

• 23% of all travelers: 16% with kids, 1/3 w/income of 
$100,000, 56% $80,000+ 

• Decreasing visitors from WA in winter 

• Markets: ND, WY (shopping), MN, OH, CA, ALB, WA, UT, 
ID, CO, NY, Europe 

• Average length of stay: 3.6 nights 

■ Attractions: 1/3 skiers, 10% eoch snowboording, 
snowmobiling, snowshoeing. 1/3 visited YNP & Little 
Bighorn, 1/4 Flathead Lake, 10% visited 6NP, events 

Spring 

• 23% of all travelers: 56% couples, 17% singles, 1/3 
w/income $80,000* 

• Markets: WA, WI, MI, OK, ID, ALB, CA, IL, MN 

• Attractions: 50% YNP/6NP, 34% Little Bighorn, 1/4 
Flathead Lake 

■ Average length of stay: 3.6 nights 

Fall 

• 29% of all travelers: 33% couples, 23% singles, 1/2 w/ 
income $80,000*, 15% used outfitter, stayed 5 nts 

■ Markets: WA, CA. ND, MN, ALB, OR, ID, ONT, MI, NV 

• Activities: hunting, shopping, wildlife watching, fishing 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



57 



Sidebar 3.8: 
Posi-Thru Traveler Characteristics 

• 28% (obout 2.3 million) of 2001 nonresident 
travelers ivere just possing through 

Holf of spring travelers were poss- through 
Couples and singles, interested in historicol/cultural 
sites and attroctions, moderate income. 
1 night stay - little activity in Montona 

Winter 



1/3 couples. 1/4 singles. 20% families. 24% w/kids. 

1/3 with income $80.000» 

Markets: WY. Conodo. NO. WA. It). CO. MN 

Activities: shopping, gambling, picnicking, wildlife, 

LAC 

Highest repeat visitors: 99% 

Spring 



1/3 couples, 31% singles. 20% families. 8% with 

kids. 56% income <$60,000, 75% repeat 

Markets: NO, WA, WI, 10, NY, Oft, WY, MN 

1/4 visited YNP, 20% Little Bighorn Bottlef leld, 

12%efJP 

Activities: history/culture. Native American, 

shopping, camping 

Summer 



45% couples, 32% families, 22% with kids 
Markets: WA, 10, CA. MN, Oft, NO, ALB 
Activities: 18% visited YNP, shopping, picnicking, 
camping, hist/cult, wildlife, hiking 
Use of internet, outo ckibs, NPS brochures 
Highwoy signs and front-line service useful 

Eal! 

34% of all trovelers, 57% couples, 9% with kids 
Markets: WA, ID, ALB, CA. MN, WY, NO, Oft, BC 
Actmities: 18% shopping, 13% wildlife watching. 12% 
visited YNP. 10% camping 

Implicotions 



Highway signs, customer service training ond VICs 
ore important to capturing pass-through trovelers. 
Target matures/couples in fall-winter-spnng, 
families in summer. 



visited by 40% of vacationers in summer, nearly half in spring, 24% in fall and only 10% 
in winter. Little Bighorn had the highest rate of visitation in spring, drawing one-third 
of vacationers (versus 12% in fall, 5% in winter and 3% in summer). The Flathead Lake 
area drew about one-fourth of vacationers in winter and spring. However, when asked 
about visitation to major sites "over the years," 2/3 of summer vacationers had been to 
Yellowstone Park, 43% to Glacier Park, 24% to Flathead Lake, 18% to Little Bighorn 
Battlefield, and 9% to the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center. Fresh, themed packaging 
and marketing of major attractions and sites would encourage ref)eat visitors to return. 

Trip planning sources for vacationers were the Internet, followed by auto clubs, 
national park brochures and other guidebooks (including Montana Travel Planner). In 
winter and fall, half of vacationers did not use any trip planning sources listed on the 
survey (friends/relatives were not listed), and in spring and summer, about one-fourth 
did not use any sources listed. The high levels of repeat visitation may be linked to the 
number of visitors who did not use planning assistance. During their trip in Montana, 
vacationers used front-line service persons, VICs, brochure racks and highway signs. 

Pass-Through Travelers 

Nearly half of Montana's spring travelers were just passing through, as were 
one-third of fall visitors, more than one quarter of winter visitors, and one-in-five 
summer visitors. In spring and summer, one-third or more of pass-through travelers 
were on vacation - but passing through Montana to vacation somewhere else. A few 
also were visiting friends/relatives, or traveling for business or shopping. Most pass- 
through travelers spent only one night in Montana - taking little time for activities. In 
fall, more than half of travel groups were couples, compared to one-third in winter and 
spring. One-quarter were singles and one-in-five were families in winter and spring. In 
summer and fall, there were more couples and families, and fewer singles. In winter 
and summer, about one quarter of pass-through travelers had kids along, but in spring 
and fall, only 8-9% had children with them. 

Most of the winter pass-through travelers came from nearby states and provinces 
(WY-24%, ALB-16%, ND/IDAVA 8-11% each, SASK/CO/BC/MN 4-6% each), as did fall 
(WA-18%, ID-13%, ALB-12%, CA, MN, WY 5% each). In spring and summer, 
Washington and Idaho were top states of origin, followed by a mixed bag of travelers (in 
spring, WI, NY, OR, WY & MN, and in summer, CA, MN, OR & ND). Canadians 



58 



Chapter 3: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Rhcreation Strategic ?\ah 2003-2007 



represented 26% of winter pass-through travelers, 6% in spring, 8% in summer and 19% 
in fall. About 13% of pass-through travelers flew during a portion of their trip, and a 
few rented cars. In summer, 20% of the cars were rented in Utah and 18% in 
Washington, indicating that travelers were flying into Salt Lake City, Spokane and 
Seattle. 

Nearly all winter (98%+) and fall (86%) pass-through travelers had visited 
Montana before, and planned to return within two years. About three quarters of spring 
and summer pass-through travelers had visited before. Only 40+% of pass-through 
travelers had incomes of $60,000+ (vs. 56-75% of destination vacationers). Winter pass- 
through travelers were slightly more affluent (31% earned $80,000+). 

Very few winter pass-through travelers stopped at major attractions or 
participated in activities other than shopping (26%) or gambling (15%). In spring, about 
one-quarter stopped at Yellowstone Park, one-in-five at Little Bighorn Battlefield and 
one-in-ten stopped at Glacier Park. The top spring activities were historical/cultural 
attractions (museums. Native American and Lewis & Clark sites), and about ten percent 
went shopping or camping. In summer, about 18% visited Yellowstone Park, but few 
stopped at other attractions. Other summer activities were shopping, picnicking, 
camping, historical/cultural activities and wildlife viewing, though none of these 
attracted more than 18% of pass-through travelers. Fall pass-through travelers enjoyed 
shopping (18%), wildlife watching (13%), visiting YNP (12%) and camping (10%). 

Many pass-through visitors did not use any trip planning sources listed in the 
survey, but of those who did, most used the Internet and auto clubs. While traveling 
through Montana, information sources were highway signs and service persons. 

VFR Travelers 

Travelers visiting friends and relatives represented one-third of all winter 
visitors (many staying over the holidays), almost one-quarter of fall visitors, but in 
spring and summer, they were only about 15% of travelers (those who listed VFR as 
their primary trip purpose). About one-third of them in winter, spring and fall, and 
two-thirds in summer, were also vacationing. They stayed about five nights in winter 
(70% of nights in the homes of friends/relatives), four nights in spring, six nights in 
summer (56% of nights in homes), and almost seven nights in fall (65% in homes). In 
winter, 44% of VFR travelers were traveling alone (presumably many were students 



Sidebar 3.9: 
VFR Traveler Characteristics 

• Least affluent (50-60% earned <$60.000) 

• Majority stay in VFR home: 1/4 v»rth kids in 
summer 

• Longest stays of all traveler types 

• 1%-14% visit major attractions, spend time 
shopping, visiting historic sites/events and outdoor 
activities (hiking, picnicking, fishing, OfiV, wildlife, 
camping, golf, history/culture) 

• Markets: WA, ID, WY, CA, CO, ND. NM, OR, AZ. 
SD.MN 

■ 1/2-2/3 used none of trip planning sources 

Winter 

• 1/3 of all travelers 

• 1/4 couples/families, 44% singles (students) 

• 21% earn $80,000* (vs. 56% of vacationers) 

• Avg. stay: 5 nts (707.. at VFR home) 

• Activities: 20% visited Little Bighorn, shopping, 
wildlife 

Spring 

157o of all travelers 

44%> couples, 1/4 singles, families 

Avg. stay: 4 nts (half at VFR home) 

19% earn $80,000* (vs. 31% of vacationers) 

Sumnf\er 



15% of all travelers 

1/3 couples, 19% singles, 40% families, 27% with 

kids 

26%> earn $80,000* (vs. 35% of vacationers 

Avg. stay: 6 nts (half in VFR home) 

Fall 
23% of all travelers 
46% couples, 29% families, 23% singles 
Avg. stay: 7 nts (65% at VFR home) 

Implications 

• Less than 15% of VFRs visited rTWjor attractions in 

Montana, except 20% stopped at Little Bighorn In 

winter, 21% at YNP in fall 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2(X)3-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



59 



Sidebar 3.10: 
Business Traveler Characteristics 

• Most affluent traveler type (40X with income 
$80,000»). from neorby states, many ac€ former 
Montana residents 

• 1/4 combine business with vocation In summer 

• 1/2 to 2/3 traveling alone. 1/5 with spouse 

• Activities: 25% visited 6NP, shopping, gambling, 
history/culture, hunting 

• Morkets: IM&. W A. CA. CO, WV, ID 
1/3 flew (43X in summer) 

Winter 

• 18% of all travelers 

^firing 

• IIX of all travelers 

• 14% bring families. 2%-3% with kids 

Summer 

• 7% of all travelers 

• 14% bring families. 10% with kids 

• Longest stays of all travelers: 7.6 nights 

Fall 

• ITRfi analysis of business travelers was omitted 
due to small sample size of business travelers 

Implicotions 

• High potential to Increase spending, extend 
stays with add-on activities 

• Potential targets for MTs biz recruitment 




coming home from college for the holidays, although age and occupation data is not 
available), and about one-quarter each were couples and families. In spring and fall, 
44% were couples, and about one-quarter each were singles and families. In summer, 
about one-third were couples, 19% singles, and nearly 40% families (27% of summer 
VFR travelers had kids along, versus 15-187o in other seasons). 

The top states from which VFR travelers originated were Washington, Idaho, 
Wyoming, Arizona, South Dakota, California, Oregon and Minnesota. It is interesting to 
note that Washington was at the top of the list for winter, summer and fall VFR 
travelers, because overall winter visitation from Washington declined since 1993. 
Nearly one-quarter of the VFR travelers flew during a portion of their trip. Most had 
been to Montana before, and planned to return within two years (90%+). In general, 
VFR travelers were the least affluent of the four traveler groups. 

Less than 15% of spring and summer VFR travelers visited major attractions in 
Montana, while in winter and fall one-in-five stopped at Little Bighorn or Yellowstone 
National Park. During fall, shopping, day hiking, wildlife watching, visiting 
museums/historic sites, hunting and sporting events (e.g. football) were favorite 
activities. Year round, popular activities were outdoor recreation (hiking, picnicking, 
fishing, 4-wheeling, wildlife viewing, camping, golf) and historical/cultural activities 
(museums, Lewis & Clark, Indian sites, festivals and events). About half went shopping 
during their visit. The majority (half to two-thirds) of VFR travelers did not use any of 
the trip planning sources listed on the survey, but of those who did, the Internet was 
most common (used by 20-30% of VFRs). While in Montana, highway signs, front-line 
service personnel and VICs were useful. 

Business Travelers 

The smallest, but most affluent, segment of nonresident tourists are those whose 
primary trip purpose is business. They represent only 18% of nonresident tourists in 
winter, 11% in spring, and 7% in summer and fall. Interestingly, they stay longer in 
summer than other travelers (Table 3.5), in part because about one-quarter are 
combining business with vacation, and 18% are also visiting friends/relatives. This 
group of travelers also mentioned that hunting in Montana is an attraction for them, so 
they could be expected to return in the fall. -Unfortunately, due to the small sample size 
of the fall survey, comprehensive analysis of fall travelers whose primary trip purpose 



Big Hole National Battlefield 



60 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Shiatecic Plan 2003-2007 



was business was omitted. However, 13% of aH fall travelers listed business as one 
reason for their trip. In the other three seasons, half to two-thirds of business tourists 
were traveling alone, while 15-18% were traveling with a spouse or partner and 10-15% 
with business associates. In spring and summer, about 14% brought family along (10% 
brought kids in the summer, versus 2-3% with kids in winter and spring). 

The states from which business travelers originate are North Dakota (37% of 
winter business travelers, 21% in spring), Washington (12% in summer), California (11- 
12% in spring and summer), Colorado (10% in spring), Wyoming (11% in winter) and 
Idaho (9% in summer). More than one-third flew during a portion of their trip (43% in 
summer), and about one-quarter rented cars (one-third in summer). Most of the 
business travelers had been to Montana before and planned to return within two years 
(87+%). More than 40% of business travelers had household incomes of $80,000+, and 
nearly two-thirds had incomes of $60,000+ (82% in winter). 

However, not many business travelers stopped at Montana's major attractions, 
with the exception of about 25% visiting Glacier Park in winter. Less than 20% visited 
Yellowstone Park, Ft. Peck Lake or the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center in winter, or 
Yellowstone Park in spring. Few business travelers engaged in outdoor activities, 
though some went hiking, fishing and wildlife viewing. Shopping, gambling, and 
historical/cultural activities were more popular. Less than one-third used trip planning 
sources listed in the survey, and of those, the most used were the Internet, private 
businesses and travel agents. During their trip, business travelers used front-line service 
persons, highway signs and brochure racks. 



Tabic 3.5: Nonresident Tourist 


Length of Stay Comparison (Nights) 


Twjriyt Typ^ 


W-nt^r 


5prinq 


Summer 


EoH 


Vacationer 


3.6 nts 


3.7 nts 


4.6 nts 


4.9 nts 


Pass-Thnj 


1.0 nts 


1.2 nts 


1.4 nts 


1.5 nts 


VFR 


4.9 nts 


4.1 nts 


5.7 nts 


6.6 nts 


Business 


3.6 nts 


1.0 nts 


7.6 nts 


n/c 



ATS Survey Results 

The ATS survey results summarized in Sidebar 3.2 in section CI (page 49) are 
from 1995, but they are consistent with more recent findings from other sources, and 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



61 



Sidebar 3.11: 

Destination Traveler Characteristics 

from All 50 States to Montana 

(1995) 

• Holf of all destination travelers were 
vocat loners. 24% i»ere VFft 

• 60% traveled l.OOO* miles to get to 
/Montana: 26% traveled less than 300 miles 
(WY/ND/SD/ID/BC/ALB/SASK) 

• 25X of all destination travelers flew 

• Two-thirds come from April-September 

• 31% stayed 1-3 nights, 31% stayed 4-7 
nights. 20% did not overnight 

• 42% stayed in hotel/resort. 37% in VFR 
home. 22% other (RV. camping, etc.) 

■ Average age was 41 

• One-<juarter were 50*, 457o were 30-49, 
and one- third were under 30 

■ Group size was 2.2 people (overage) 

■ 417o were couples, 30% traveled alone, 
27% had kids along 

• 35% earned $60,000* annually, 29% earned 
$40-60,000, 37% earned less than $40,000 

• 36% had a high school education, 
25% had some college, 

39% hod o bochelors degree or higher 

Source; 1995 American Trovel Survey A TRR 



^4early half of Montana's 2001 nonresident 
tourists were poss-through/VFR/shopping 
travelers combined. These three categories 
have shorter stays and spend less money 
than vacationers or business travelers. 



they provide more detailed data about visitors from four key states from which many of 
Montana's travelers originate. The same study looked at Montana's destination 
travelers from all 50 states, and the results are summarized in Sidebar 3.11 at left. 

Summary of Traveler Typ es 

• Vacationers are half of all travelers in summer, one-quarter in fall, winter and 
spring. The majority of them are couples, though one-third are families in summer. 
One-in-three winter vacationers are skiers, 41% are shoppers and 20% hikers. In fall, 
43% enjoy hunting, 41% go shopping and 34% go fishing. In spring, most popular 
activities are historical sites, hiking, shopping, and camping. In summer, vacationers 
enjoy wildlife viewing, hiking, shopping, picnicking, and history. Top vacationer 
markets overall are WA, CA, ND, ALB, MN, Ml, ID, WY, OR, and CO. However, in 
winter the primary markets are ND, WY and MN, while in spring, top states are 
WA, Wl, Ml, and OK. In summer, the number one state is CA, followed by WA, Alb, 
MN, and UT, and in fall, the top states are WA, CA and ND. Vacationers were the 
second most affluent traveler type, behind business travelers. 

■ Pass-throug h travelers are half of all nonresident travelers in spring, one-third in 
fall, one-quarter in winter and one-in-five in summer. They originate mainly from 
surrounding states/provinces (in winter, one-in-four are Canadians; in fall, one-in- 
five), but also from WA, ID, CO, MN, Wl, OR and CA. They stay only one night in 
Montana, and make few stops other than for gas and meals. Those who do stop for 
attractions or activities go shopping, visit historic/cultural sites and Yellowstone 

, Park, wildlife watching or picnicking. About one-third of pass-through travelers are 
couples, one-in-four are singles, and twenty percent are families (there are more 
couples and families in summer and fewer singles in fall). About one-quarter have 
children with them (8-9% in spring/fall). Most have been to Montana before. This 
group tends to be less affluent than vacation or business travelers, but more affluent 
than VFR travelers. 

■ VFR travelers are one-third of winter visitors, 23% in fall, and about 15% in spring 
and summer. They stay longer than other visitors (4-6 nights), but half to two-thirds 
of those nights are spent in the homes of family/friends. In winter, 44% of VFR 
travelers are single - presumably students coming home for the holidays, while one- 
quarter are couples and one-quarter families. In spring and fall about 45% are 



62 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recheation Shiategic Plan 2003-2007 



couples, and one-quarter are families, while in summer, one-third are couples and 
40% are families (27% have kids along). Less than 15% of VFR travelers visit 
Montana's attractions, but they do shop, visit historic/culture sites and join their 
resident family/friends in outdoor recreation activities like hiking, hunting, fishing, 
4-wheeling, etc. They originate mainly from WA, ID, WY, MN, ND, AZ, CO, CA, 
OR, ALBT, UT, and 86%+ are repeat visitors. VFRs are the least affluent of all 
traveler types. 

Business travelers represent 7%-18% of all nonresident travelers in Montana. They 
are the most affluent traveler type (1/3 earn $100,000+), and in summer, one-quarter 
of them combine business with vacation in Montana (average summer stay is 7.6 
nights). Half to two-thirds of them travel alone, but 15%-18% are couples, and 14% 
bring their family along. They originate from ND, WA, CA, CO, WY and ID. One- 
third of them fly (43% in summer), and one-quarter rent cars. Most are repeat 
visitors (87%+), and many of them are sportsmen (11% went fishing in summer, and 
17% were attracted by Montana's hunting opportunities). They also enjoyed 
shopping, historic/cultural sites, gambling and Glacier Park (25% in winter). 

In 2001, half of all nonresident visitors in Montana (53%) were pass- 
throughA'FR/shopping travelers combined. These three categories of travelers have 
shorter stays and tend to spend less money than vacationers or business travelers. 
Shoppers are primarily day-trippers from WY/ND/ID/ALB. 

The extremely high numbers of repeat visitors could result from several factors: 
satisfied customers; many shoppers/pass-through/business travelers from 
neighboring states; many college studentsA'FR travelers coming home to visit 
family; and/or many out-of-state vacation homeowners visiting their property. 
Vacation travelers have lower repeat visitation rates than VFR, pass-through or 
business travelers, but still post relatively high repeat rates of 70%-88% (Table 3.6). 

Nationally, vacationers are taking shorter vacations, creating declines in overall 
length of stay and spending. 

Half of Montana's commercial airline passengers are nonresident travelers. 

These findings of larger proportions of repeat, pass-through and VFR travelers, and 
shorter trip lengths, partially explain why visitation at key sites around the state has 
declined, despite increases in the overall quantity of visitors. 



Table 3.6 


2001 Nonresident Tourist 


Repeat Visitation Rate Comparison (%) 


Tourist Tvoe 


Winter Sprino Summer Fall 


Vacationer 


887o 74% 70% 84% 


Pass-Thru 


99% 75% 75% 86% 


VFR 


97% 94% 91% 97% 


Business 


90% 87% 87% n/a 




Carriage Ride in Helena 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



63 



Sidebar 3.12: Montana's Competition 

State Key ^ttroctions/OestifMtions 

CaUf. Bcoch/oceon. urban centers/arts/culture (SF/LA). Napa Volley. 

Disneyland, conventions, Yosemite/Redwoods/Death Valley Natl 
Parks. San Diego, Hwy 101, mountoins, lakes (Tahoe), forests, 
Mrhitewater, skiing, pro sports, fishing, hunting, camping, bike 
touring. western/Sponish/tribal heritoge, scenic byways 

N etrwdo Gambling/entertoinment. conventions, packages. Lake 

Meod/Hovasu. rodeo, mining/twestern history, high desert. Lake 
Tahoe, skiing, boating, fishing, hunting, camping 

Idaho Sun Volley. Boise. Coeur d'Alene, lakes, golf, convention center, 
Salmon River, Hells Canyon, hunting, fishing. whiteMiater. skiing, 
snoMimobiling, hiking, Frank Church/Selwoy/Bitterroot/Saw- 
tooth Wilderness, Craters of the Moon NM, western/mining/ 
tribal history, Lewis & Ckirk Trail, camping, scenic byways 

Utah SLC, Salt Palace, pro sports. Pork City. Moab, Zion/Bryce 

Canyon/Arches Not'l Parks, Red Rock Canyon, camping, skiing, 
snowmobiling, hunting, mountain biking, hiking, scenic byways 

Wash. Ocean. Seattle, pro sports, urban omenitles/arts/cuiture, 

conventions. Pike Street Market, Mt. Rainier, Olympic Mtns, Mt. 
St. Helens, fishing, skiing, hiking, bike touring, tribal/fur trading 
history, wineries, scenic byways, Lewis 4 Clark Troll 

Oregon Beoches/ocean, Portland, orts/culture, pro sports, conventions, 
fishing, whale watching, wineries, microbrews, Bend/Mt. 
Bachelor/Hood. Craler Lake, hunting, skiing, hiking, bike touring, 
Shokespeore Festival. tribal/Oregon Troll/Lewis & Ckirk Trail, 
Wallowa Lake, camping, scenic byways 

S.Oak. Mt. Rushmore. Bkick Hills. Badkinds, Rapid City, Hot Springs, 

Sturgis, Sioux Falls, western/tribal/mining history, LAC, hunting, 
fishing, dinosaurs, buffalo, gambling, scenic byways 

Arixena 6rond Canyon, golf, resorts, pro sports, boseball, Phoenlx/Sun 
City, conventions, tribal/Hispanic culture, Petrified Forest, Lake 
Havasu. Flogstoff , snowbird rollies/Quartzsite 

Colorado Rocky Mountains, Mesa Verde Natl Pork, Pike's Peak, skiing, 

Aspen/Vail, Denver, urban amenities, arts/culture, conventions, 
pro sports, western/mining/tnbol history, scenic byways, skiing, 
hunting, mountaineering. Whitewater, fishing, mtn biking 

Source: 1995 American Travel Survey/ITRR 



I 



D. Montana's Competitive Niche 

: D.l Montana's Competition has Similar Assets 

The AT5 Survey identified the states of origin of Montana's 
destination travelers. It also identified other destinations that travelers 
from those states are likely to visit. Sidebar 3.12 lists the destinations most 
likely to attract the same tourists as Montana (e.g., competitor states), and 
some of their key attractions. Note: an in-depth analysis of Montana's 
competition is beyond the scope of this strategic plan; however, further 
research in this area may provide enlightening information for decisions 
about future promotion campaign targets and themes. 

Most of the states have characteristics that are similar to Montana 
(mountains, forests, lakes, rivers, outdoor recreation, urban amenities, 
westem/tribal/mining history and culture). Some have well-known 
national parks and other natural attractions, as well as man-made 
attractions (Disneyland, Las Vegas, golf resorts). Others have well-known 
ski resorts (Park City, Aspen, Sun Valley, Tahoe), or historic and cultural 
attractions. Most of the states have better air service than Montana (more 
airlines serving them, and/or more scheduled flights). 

The key competitive factors (characteristics sought by consumers 
who are likely to be interested in Montana) appear to be the following: 

■ Outstanding natural assets (mountains, lakes, rivers) - escape from city 

■ "Major" national parks or other natural attractions 

■ Outdoor recreation (hiking, fishing, hunting, skiing, water sports) 

■ Wildlife 

• Some urban amenities: shopping, dining, culture 

■ High quality entertainment (not necessarily "Broadway", but 
opportunities to enjoy "name" entertainment and nightlife) 

• Interesting/unique history and historical sites 

■ Packaged, age-appropriate activities for children 

• Convenient access 



64 



Chapter 3: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



So the question is: 

"What is Montana's competitive advantage?" 
In order to answer that question, four areas of subject matter must be considered: 

1. The character and condition of Montana's unique natural/historic/cultural assets 

2. Montana's existing tourism and recreation support services/infrastructure 

3. The results of state and national tourism and recreation trend research 

4. Montana's current image in the marketplace 

The first two topics were discussed in Chapter 2, and the third topic earlier in 
this chapter. The fourth topic was addressed in a 1999 study commissioned by Travel 
Montana to determine Montana's image in four selected urban markets. The results are 
discussed in section D.2 below. 

D.2 Montana's National Image is Positive; Even "Negatives" are Positive 

A study that was conducted in 1999 to gain insights about Montana's image 
among potential travelers produced the following results, based on surveys with 
consumers in four key metropolitan travel markets^: 

Positive imag es that consumers expressed about Montana were the following: 

■ Vast unspoiled landscapes, mountains, water 

■ Fishing, hunting, hiking, camping 

■ Western culture: Cowboys and Indians 

These images are consistent with Montana's key natural/historic/cultural assets, 
and they indicate that Montana's image advertising and promotional materials which 
highlight those assets have been working. 

On the other hand, those same images can have a different impact on certain 
market segments: 

Ne gative imag es that consumers expressed about Montana were the following: 

■ Lacks sophistication, culture, arts 

■ Few high quality amenities 



Sidebar 3.13: 
National Image of Montana 

The results from a 1999 study of 
consumers in key metropolitan travel 
markets found that potential travelers had 
the following images about Montana: 

Positive Images 

■ Vast, unspoiled landscapes 

■ Mountains, water 

■ Fishing, hunting, hiking, camping 

■ Western culture; Cowboys <S Indians 

Negative Images 

• Lacks sophistication, culture, arts 

• Few high quality amenities 

• Things to "see", but not to "do" 

• Not "kid-friendly", safety concerns 

■ Hard to access, difficult to purchase 

The good news is that the "negative" 
images are misconceptions: Montana does 
have sophistication, culture, arts, high 
quality amenities, entertainment and 
activities for kids (though packages arc 
needed). The access and purchase issues are 
real, but can be addressed. Montana's 
"negative" images are not like those of other 
states (crime, overcrowded, polluted, humid, 
dirty), so Montana has opportunities to 
refine its image among potential travelers. 

Source; MT Image 4 Positioning Assessment, Dec '99 



5 



Montana image & Positioning Assessment, Strategic Marlceting and Researcli, Inc., Deceml?er 1999 
Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi.an 2003-2007 Chapter 3: Markets 



65 




Bison in Yellowstone National Park 



Montana's Competitive Advantage 

The advantages that Montana has 
over its competitor states can be 
summarized by the following descriptors: 

• Uncrowded 

• Clean air and water 

• Healthy and abundant wildlife 

■ Outstanding historical attractions 
(authentic, not "Disney") 

• 2,000 miles of the Lewis & Clark Trail 

• Casual but classy cultural and urban 
amenities 

• Safe 

■ Good highway/road system 

• Genuine, friendly people 

■ &ood value for the money 



• Things to "see", but not to "do" (entertainment) 

• Not "kid-friendly" (few activities designed for kids with and without parental 
participation), safety concerns in "wide open spaces" or on water , or around 
"dangerous" wildlife or livestock 

• Hard to access, difficult to purchase travel (packages, online booking, etc.) 

These perceptions in some ways are the "flip side" of promoting an image which 
emphasizes themes of "natural", "wide open spaces", "big sky" and "wildlife." 
However, the good news is that the "negative" images are misconceptions: Montana 
does have sophistication, culture, arts, high quality amenities, entertainment and 
packaged kids' activities (though more are needed). The access and purchase issues are 
real, but also can be addressed. So these "negative images" are not really "negative" - 
not like "high crime rate, overcrowded, polluted, humid, dirty" or other images that 
some destinations must overcome (including some of Montana's competitors). 

The desired imag e that Montana seeks to communicate to the world depends on which 
market segments Montana tourism and recreation stakeholders decide to target, based 
on its competitive advantage. 



D.3 Montana has a Multi-faceted Competitive Advantage 

After reviewing the four areas of information outlined in section D.l (Montana's 
assets, services, research and image), Montana's competitive advantage (compared to 
competitor states) can be summarized by the following descriptors: 

Uncrowded 

Clean air and water 

Healthy and abundant wildlife 

Outstanding historical attractions (authentic, not "Disney") 

2,000 miles of the Lewis & Clark Trail 

Casual but classy cultural and urban amenities 

Safe 

Good highway/road system 

Genuine, friendly people 

Good value for the money 



66 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Market Segment Demographic HH Income Vacation Interests 



Traditional 



Adults 35+ 



E. Top Priority Target Markets 

This section discusses current and potential target markets, and the planning 
team's recommendations for highest priority markets. 

E.l Criteria for Identifying Top Priority Markets Emphasizes ROI 

Previous research and strategic planning efforts identified a set of priority 
nonresident target markets for Montana (see Markets map, page 69). Table 3.7 lists the 
state's 2001-2002 demographic and geographic target markets. The planning team has 
identified a list of criteria and recommendations for determining top priority markets for 
2003-2007, based on the existing conditions described in Chapter 2, the state/national 
tourism trends described earlier in this chapter, and Montana's image and competitive 
advantage described in the previous section. A key 
determinant for the selection of criteria is potential Return 
on Investment, or ROI, of visitor segments targeted. 

The criteria for priority market segments are as follows: 

" Likely to have a positive image of Montana, and a 
strong interest in Montana as a destination 

■ Propensity to spend more per trip than other segments 

■ Tendency to enjoy more developed attractions and 
destinations, rather than backcountry assets 

■ Low-impact, in terms of likelihood to compete with 
Montanans for outdoor recreation experiences 

• Likely to participate in high-value outdoor recreation 
(skiing, golf, guided adventures/fishing/hunting) 

■ Inclination to travel during shoulder seasons 

• Accessible to Montana via 1-2 day drive or reasonable 
air service connections 

■ Interest in history /culture/Lewis & Clark Bicentennial 

Based on these criteria, the next section identifies 
top priority markets for 2003-2007, based on the planning 
team's recommendations. 



Tabic 3.7: Montana's 2001-2002 Nonresident Target Markets 



$60,000+ Scenic driving, nature photography, with and w/o 

children, camping/hiking and wildlife viewing. 
Includes families interested in creating a relaxing 

and memorable experience together. 



Active Mature Adults 55-64 $60,000+ 



Participate primarily in sightseeing, photography, 
camping and wildlife viewing. 



RV/Camping 



Adults 35-54 

w/ children 
Adults 55-64 



$60,000+ Participate in camping, hiking and visiting with 

children historic sites, sightseeing. 
Photography and wildlife viewing. 



Golf 



Adults 35-54 $60,000+ Participate in golfing and travel to resorts. 



Photography Adults 35+ $60,000+ 



Participate in photography on either an amateur or 
professional level. 



Western 
History/Culture 



Adults 35+ 



$60,000+ Interest in Western history and culture. Likely to 

visit an historical site as part of their vacation. Some 
also interested in Western clothing, lifestyle, arts and 

crafts, architecture, music and dancing. 



Outdoor 
Enthusiasts 



Adults 35-54 $60,000+ 



Participate in camping/hiking, mountain biking, 
fishing, hunting and a variety of other outdoor 
activities. Look for a challenging experience. 



Geographic 

Targets: 



Western states: California, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Utah, Colorado, 

North Dakota, South Dakota and Texas; 
Midwest states: Illinois, Wisainsin, M innesota and Missouri. 



Source; Wendt-Kochman 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 3: Markets 



67 



Fig. 3.4: Top Priority Target Markets 




Sidebar 3.14: 
Top Priority Target Markets 

Demographic 

• Mature travelers, income $75,000* 

• Couples, income $75,000* 

■ Non-business conventions & meetings 

■ Heritage/cultural travelers, esp. LAC 

• Families with children, income $75,000* 

• Adventurers, income $75,000* 

geographic 

■ Nearby states/provinces for weekend 
getaways, conferences, skiers 

■ California for vacationers 

• Southwest for matures 

• Midwest for families, skiers 

■ Eastern metro markets for vacationers 

• Europe for couples, families, adventurers 

• Montana for more money kept at home 



E.2 Target High Value/Low Impact Nonresident Travelers for Best Return 

The following are t2E priority markets for 2003-2007. The intention of this list is 
not to eliminate other traveler segments from inclusion in promotion efforts, but to 
identify top priority markets that will maximize the return on dollars invested. 

Demographic Market Segments 

Mature travelers, income $75,000+, interested in history/culture/arts, soft adventure, 
golf, skiing, scenic attractions 

Couples, income $75,000+, interested in history/culture/arts, casual urban amenities 
and entertainment, resorts, events, guided adventures, skiing, scenic attractions 
Conventions & meetings, esp. non-business (associations, research/education, 
religious), and business linked to Montana (ag, forestry, mining, etc.) 
Heritage/cultural travelers, esp. Lewis & Clark "buffs", income $75,000+, interest in 
history/culture/arts, dining, shopping, reenactments, museums, historic sites 
Families with children, income $75,000+, interested in destinations with age- 
appropriate activities for kids, entertainment and safe adventures 
Guided Adventurers, income $75,000+, (vs. do-it-yourself adventure travelers) 

Geographic Market Segments 



Nearby states/provinces (WA, OR, ID, NV, UT, CO, WY, SD, ND, SASK, ALB, BC) 

for year-round weekend getaway packages, conventions & meetings, metro skiers 

California for destination vacationers: couples, matures, heritage/culture, adventure, 

skiers 

Arizona/Texas for matures, couples, high value VFR travelers 

Midwestern states (MN, Wl, Ml, IL, OH, MO) for couples, families, matures, VFR, 

heritage/cultural/L&C, skiers 

Eastern metro markets (NYC, DC, Boston, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Charlotte, Orlando, 

Tampa) for destination vacationers: couples, heritage/cultural/L&C, matures, 

adventurers 

Europe, for couples, families interested in American West, guided adventures, scenic 

driving, culture, events & festivals 

Montana, to encourage Montanans to spend their leisure travel dollars at home. 



68 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



The next chapter. Chapter 4, defines a vision, strategic framework and goals for 
this 5- Year Strategic Plan, based on the "supply" and "demand" information defined in 
this chapter and the previous one, and on input from Montana tourism and recreation 
stakeholders. Chapter 5 describes specific objectives and actions to achieve the goals, in 
the context of market needs and trends as defined in this chapter. 



Figure 3.5 shows the actuol origins of 
2000-2001 nonresident tourists who 
were traveling in Montana, along with the 
states being targeted by Travel Montana 
and the tourism rcgions/CVBs. 



Figure 3.5: Montana's 2000-2001 Nonresident Tourist Markets 




Actuol 2000-01 Visitors 
From ITRR Research: 

Winter 

Spring 

Summer 

Fall 

From FWP License Sales: 



From Internet Conversion Research: 
I MT Web Site Users 

Stote/ReQionol Targets 2001: 
^ Trove! Montana 
^ Region/CVB 



% 



Nonresident Hunters 
Nonresident Fisherman 



Table 3.8: Top 


yj.S. Metro Market Sources of Inquiries 


to Montana Coll Center, 2001, 


by 


Ad Campaign 


Warm Season 


MT/WYCo-oD 




Downhill Ski 


NYC 


NYC 




NYC 


Chicago 


Chicago 




Seattle 


L.A. 


Philadelphia 




Denver 


Seattle 


Minneapolis 




LA. 


Philadelphia 


LA. 




Chicogo 


Dallas 


Denver 




San Francisco 


Minneapolis 


Dallas 




Philadelphia 


San Francisco 


Boston 




St. Louis 


Denver 


San Francisco 




Portland 


Houston 


Seattle 




Spokane 


Phoenix 


St. Louis 




6rand Rapids 


Detroit 


Tampa 




Minneapolis 


Cleveland 


D.C. 




Phoenix 


St. Louis 


Cleveland 




Boston 


Portland 


Pittsburgh 




Salt Lake City 


Winter funeral) 


Snowmobile 




Miscellaneous 


Minneapolis 


LA. 




Minneapolis 


NYC 


Seattle 




NYC 


Seattle 


Minneapolis 




Chicago 


LA. 


Son Francisco 




Seattle 


Dallas 


Chicago 




LA. 


Denver 


Denver 




Philodelphki 


Atlanta 


Sacramento 




Portland 


Chicago 


Portlond 




Denver 


Orlando 


Phoenix 




Dallas 


Philadelphia 


6reen Boy 




St. Louis 


Houston 


Cincinnati 




DC. 




Philadelphia 




Phoenix 




Boston 




Atlonto 




6rand Rapids 




Houston 




Spokane 




Boston 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



CHAPTERS: Markets 



69 



(This page, deliberately left blank.) 



70 



Chapter 3: Markets Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Responding to Resident & Nonresident Markets is Key to Strategy 

The years 2003-2007 offer tremendous opportunity for tourism and recreation in 
Montana. The Lewis & Clark Bicentennial is projected to be one of the largest tourism events 
in recent years. If those projections are realized, the Bicentennial can serve to enhance 
Montana's economy and create jobs, but it also can create many challenges. The key to 
exploiting the Bicentennial in a positive way - and all tourism opportunities in Montana - is 
to focus strategically on sustainable tourism that meets the needs of both Montanans and 
nonresident visitors in a changing tourism marketplace. 

It is clear that Montanans view tourism as an essential component of the state's 
economy; however, they desire to focus on the kinds of tourism that maximize benefits to 
their communities and businesses, while minimizing impacts on their own outdoor 
recreation experiences, and on Montana's outstanding natural, historic and cultural assets. 

This chapter defines both the context for, and the components of, the tourism and 
recreation strategy for Montana. The context is expressed in four dimensions: 

♦ Vision 

♦ Guiding Principles 

♦ Market-Driven Approach 

♦ Strategic Goals 

The 2003-2007 Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategy is presented in its four key 
components: 

♦ Strategic Framework 

♦ Organization and Roles (for Management and Implementation) 

♦ Objectives and Actions (Chapter 5) 

♦ Implementation and Accountability (Chapter 6) 

This chapter explains the strategic framework for the Plan, the emphasis on market- 
driven, sustainable tourism, and key partner organizations and their roles. Chapter 5 provides 
details about the Plan's top priority objectives and actions, and Chapter 6 explains the 
implementation steps and timeline to accomplish the strategic goals, objectives cind actions. 



Chapter 4: 

The 2003-2007 
Montana Tourism & 
Recreation Strategy 

A. Strategic Vision 

B. Guiding Principles 

C. Market-Driven Approach 

D. Strategic Goals 

E. Strategic Framework 

F. Organization & Roles 



'No amount of sophistication is going 
to allay the fact that all of your 
knowledge is about the past and all 
of your decisions are about the 
future. ' 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



71 



'Tourism and recreation are 
crucial components of a healthy 
society, just as essential as other 
state services such as schooling, 
sanitation, and justice. The vision 
for tourism and recreation in 
Montana should reflect that. ' 

- Citizen at one of eight Strategic 
Plan public meetings 



Strategic Vision for Tourism 

It is the year 2007. Tourism and 
recreation in Montana has achieved 
the following: 

Balance, between Montana's 

character/assets and needs of 
visitors/communities 

Cooperation between public-privote- 
tribal-nonprof it groups to work 
as a team on common goals 

Support funding for marketing, 
support services, mgmt of 
assets, technical assistance 

Respect- recognition of economic & 
social benefits of tourism 

Accountability- comprehensive 

evaluation system to track A 
measure results/impocts 



A. The Strategic Vision 

Montimans have varied opinions about tourism and its direction in their state. In order 
to establish a strategic direction for this Plan, the planning team asked Montanans about their 
vision for the future of tourism and recreation. There was surprising consensus about the key 
elements of that vision, as expressed by Montanans from a wide variety of perspectives, sectors 
and geographic locations. The vision statement has five comjX)nents which present a "desired 
future condition" for tourism and recreation in Montana: 

It is the year 2007. Tourism and recreation in Montana has achieved the following: 

Balance . Montana's imique character and sense of place are retained while providing quality 
experiences for both residents and nonresident visitors. Montana's rich natural, historic and 
cultural assets are managed for sustainable levels of visitation in a manner consistent with 
responsible, shared use. Communities that desire tourism are benefiting from new revenue and 
jobs, while retaining their community integrity and heritage. Montana is known for its diverse, 
high quality natural, historic, and cultural tourism and recreation experiences, and the friendly 
professionalism of its people. 

Cooperation . Effective public-private-nonprofit-tribal partnerships are engaged in visionary, 
collaborative planning and implementation efforts which foster economic growth and stability, 
while respecting the values of Montancms. The private sector, community development 
organizations, supporting public agencies and the nonprofit sector are working as a team, 
tapping limited resources more effectively through their strategic, collaborative efforts. 

Support . Sufficient financial and technical assistance are available from various sources to 
support effective tourism marketing/research, management of natural/historic/cultural assets, 
and business development. Tourism is integrated into Montana's education and workforce 
training systems. Stable funding sources that do not diminish tourism marketing funds are 
available to develop and maintain infrastructure for tourism and recreation needs. 

Respect . Tourism is recognized as an essential element of Monttina's economy. It is appreciated 
by Montana citizens and elected officials for its financial and social contributions to the State. 
The Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commemoration has concluded successfully, leaving imjx>rt<mt 
lasting legacies for Montana residents, as well as continuing opportimities for businesses and 
visitors. 



72 



Chapter 4: The Stkatecy 



Montana Tourism & Recreatton Strateuc Plan 2003-2007 



Accountability . A comprehensive evaluation system is being used to measure the success and 
the impacts of tourism development and marketing, consistent with the strategic goals and 
objectives. Information about visitation trends, impacts and visitor research are widely 
distributed to provide businesses and agencies the information they need to make good 
management decisions, and to be responsive to changing customer tastes and preferences. 



B. Guiding Principles 

There are many ways to "do" tourism. Across the board, Montana businesses, citizens 
and stakeholder groups who participated in the planning process expressed that tourism in 
Montana should be a high quality experience which respects and celebrates Montana's uruque 
heritage and character, not a "tacky tourist trap." They also wcmt tourism to be sustainable: 
tourism should contribute to the economy without sacrificing long-term benefits for short-term 
profits. Tourists should not degrade the state's extraordinary natural, historic and cultural 
assets. 

Therefore, the Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan is guided by the following 
six principles. These guiding principles reflect the values, or "moral compass," expressed by 
Montana citizens in the public meetings, online survey, and other outreach efforts conducted by 
the planning team. They are the criteria against which tourism and recreation strategies will be 
evaluated and prioritized. In brief, all programming and actions should adhere to these 
guiding principles. 

♦ Serve the needs of Montanans first: retain Montana's character, sense of place and assets 
while providing economic benefits for citizens and businesses 

♦ Manage for sustainable, high-quality visitor experiences: practice good stewardship 

♦ Maximize economic and social benefits by targeting high-value, low impact visitors 

♦ Retain local control of decision-making about types and quantities of visitors to invite 

♦ Respect diverse needs, perspectives and concerns in tourism plarming and promotion 

♦ Collaborate to resolve issues through positive, inclusive, solutions-based processes 

If tourism and recreation plarmers, marketers and stakeholders adhere to these 
principles as they implement strategic actions over the next five years and beyond, Montana can 
achieve the vision for tourism outlined in the previous section. 



'IVe need to capitalize on present as 
well as historic attractions - we 
should not become a "tourist trap. ' 
i.e. building things for tourism 's sake 
only. Plan ahead to conserve our 
culture while offering hospitality. ' 

- Public meeting participant 




Moss Mansion 



Guiding Principles for Strategic Plan 

■ Serve Montanans' needs first 

■ Manage for sustainability 

■ Maximize economic & social benefits 

■ Retain local control 

■ Respect diverse needs & 
perspectives 



J 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



73 



Fig. 4.1: Market-Driven Approoch 




Communication 
(NartcaUng) 



Tou ritm / Recreation 
l*roducts ft Services 



I Busines* 

, I Support 

f t 

I I Planning 



r 



Infra- I Assets 
structure 



i Hanagem't 



Planning, Partnerships, Funding 
(Implementation System) 



Infrostructurc refers to tourism-related f ocilities, 
signs, visitor centers, tronsportotion. utilities, etc. 
Assets AAono9en<ent refers to sustainable management 
of Montana's natural, historic and cultural assets. 



C. Market-Driven Approach 

The strategic approach for the Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan is 
market-driven, as depicted in Figure 4.1. Tourism planning, development and 
promotion must meet the needs of both Montanans and nonresident visitors within the 
context of the guiding principles. 

In figure 4.1, Montcmans and nonresidents are the markets, or "Demand". The 
product, or "Supply", is the tourism and recreation products and services offered or 
managed by the public, private and nonprofit sectors (parks, forests, hotels, 
restaurants, tours, events, airlines, museums, etc.). The quality and success of the 
product depends upon the building blocks of effective business support services 
(technical, financicil), adequate infrastructure to supfwrt tourism and recreation 
(transportation, signs, restrooms, telecommunications services, etc.), and bcilcmced 
management of Montana's natural, historic, and cultural assets. The "Foundation" of 
the system is effective, informed plaiming and partnerships, with adequate funding for 
implementation. 

The link between Supply and Demand is communication: marketing, 
promotion and public relations. In order to achieve the tourism vision, 
commurucations must be strategic, targeting high-value, low-impact visitors as defined 
in the Target Markets section of Chapter 3. 



'I wish Montana could be seen/presented as 
a progressive place with a balance between 
history, the Wild West, home to Native 
peoples and a place where educated 
successful people can find mental A physical 
relaxation and rejuvenation. ' 

- Public meeting participant 




Amtrak Station 



74 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strateqc Pian 2003-2007 



D. Strategic Goals 

There are seven broad goals toward which action will be focused to attain the vision for 2007: 

1. Enhance awareness cind support for tourism cind recreation among Montana citizens and 
elected officials, including additional funding sources to support sustainable tourism. 

2. Increase four-season tourism revenues in all regions of the state, through enhcmcement of 
products/services that focus on high-value, low-impact visitors, especially heritage and 
cultural tourists. 

3. Implement a more coordinated, proactive system to manage, enhance and protect 
Montana's natural, historical and cultural assets with balanced, sustainable levels of 
resident and nonresident visitor use. 

4. Improve and maintain tourism and recreation irifrastructure to support high quality 
resident and noruesident visitor experiences. 

5. Nurture desirable business growth and diversification in the tourism and recreation 
industry through business support services and technical assistance. 

6. Communicate with the markets through highly targeted promotions that increase aware- 
ness and attract desirable tourists; measure, track and evaluate tourism results and trends. 

7. Build an effective tourism and recreation "team" to facilitate partnerships, share 
information and leverage funding/technical resources in order to realize the vision for 2007. 

The next two sections describe a strategic framework and organizational system that 
provides the structure to achieve the seven goals. Chapter 5 provides details about specific 
objectives and actions required to accomplish them. Chapter 6 describes a step-by-step 
implementation program, including timeline, responsible organizations and potential resources 
to pay for actions. 



Tourism Strategic 6oa\s 

1. Enhance awareness & support for 
tourism, including funding. 

2. Increase 4-season benefits in all 
regions, enhance products/services. 

3. Implemented system to manage 4 
protect assets w/ sustainable use. 

4. Enhance & maintain infrastructure. 

5. Provide business support services. 

6. Communicate with markets, track 4 
evaluate results. 

7. Build an effective team, partner- 
ships to realize vision for 2007. 



"Tourism' should be a respected and 
understood industry by all Montana 
citizens, not just the motels, BdBs. 
restaurants, convenience stores and gas 
stations. The economic importance of 
tourism should be well publicized and 
explained to all sectors of Montana. 
Tourism funds schools, cities, all tax 
supported government activities. 
Employees of these entities have to 
understand where the money comes from 
and welcome it. ' 

- Public meeting participant 



McM^ANA Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



75 




Teams 



Strotcgk Framework Elements 

■ Monoging Information: 

- Aiwareness-building/lodging tax 
-Promotion, public rekitions. packaging 

- Tracking A research 
-Info-shoring: collect/disseminate 

■ AAonoging (Use of) Assets: 

- Boionce between asset protection & 
visitor/business needs 

- Access to public/private lands 

- Transportation system 4 signs 

- 6ood stewardship of natural/ 
historic/cultural assets, limits 

- Visitor information/interpretation 

- Enhanced communities, facilities 

• Creating Teams: 

- Linkages between agriculture & 
tourism 

- Partnerships to address asset mgmt 

- Business assistance 

- Entrepreneurial opportunities 

- Enhanced 'edu-structure' 

- Funding partnerships/other sources 

- Effective Pkm implementation 






E. Strategic Framework has 3 Elements: Information, Assets & Teams 

To accomplish the strategic goals, the planning team worked with Montana's tourism 
and recreation stakeholders to identify specific objectives amd actions. The seven goals 
originally generated forty-two objectives cmd one hundred and fifty specific actions. Those 
objectives and actioiis were then prioritized, consolidated and grouped into three key elements 
that make up the strategic framework: 

1. Managing Information 

2. Managing (the Use of) Assets 

3. Creating Teams 

Mcmaging information means the collection and dissemination of strategic information, 
including actions to address visitor ir\formation/interpretation, promotion/public relations, 
tracking of results, research, awareness-building and information-sharing/exchange. 

Managing the use of assets means assuring sustainability through actions that address 
Montana's transportation system, access to public/private Icmds and waters, balance between 
asset protection and business development, good stewardship of natural/historic/cultural assets 
through reasonable limits, entrepreneurial opportunities, enhancing communities/local 
facilities, and developing new products/services to meet the needs of targeted markets. As 
visitation, or use, increases, the level of management also must increase ("the more guests you 
have in your home, the more you must vacuum the carpet"). 

Creating teams me«ms building partnerships to implement actions that address 
continued/enhanced funding through the lodging tax and other sources, coordination among 
agencies, business assistance, and enhancing Montcina's "edu-structure" to support tourism. 
The key to effective implementation of the Strategic Plan actions is to build stronger 
collaborative teams at the state and regional levels between private, public, tribal and nonprofit 
sector partners. 

The next section discusses how those teams will be formed or enhanced, along with their 
roles and relationships. 



76 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



Montana Tourism Sc Recreation Strateqc Plan 2003-2007 



F. Organization and Roles 

F.l Enhanced Teams are Needed at the State and Regional Levels to Achieve Goals 

Montana's tourism promotion and development program has been highly successhil 
and is the envy of many other states. As described in Chapter 2, growth in tourism over the 
past decade has been extraordinary. However, some of the growth has produced challenges 
for managers of major attractions, and for Montanans who are accustomed to having their 
state's assets "all to themselves." Moreover, as described in Chapter 3, markets are changing, 
and some of those changes require new approaches to respond effectively to market needs. 

During the past decade, Montana's lead tourism players at the state and regional levels 
have focused primarily on promotion activities - building Montana's image and "getting the 
word out" beyond the state's borders. Their successes are evidenced by the numbers. In order 
to be responsive to \he future needs of Montanans, and to changing markets, a broader, more 
coUaboraHve role is needed in the next five years. Effective implementation of this Strategic 
Plcm - to best serve the customer and the tourism industry (private, public, tribal and nonprofit 
stakeholders) - requires enhanced partnerships and teams. 

Tourism is an important economic development strategy for Montana, yet too often, 
there is little commvmication or collaboration between state/regional tourism organizations 
and representatives from other economic sectors (agriculture, ranching, mining, technology, 
manufacturing, coriservation, the arts). Many economic development professionals have 
limited knowledge about tourism and its current or potential benefits to communities. At 
the local level, regional tourism organizations have not been strong "players" or facilitators 
for tourism's role in regionalAocal plarming cind economic development efforts. So, often 
there is no "voice" for tourism in economic development - tourism is not a partner - and 
therefore is ignored. This lack of awareness about tourism has implications in the political 
arei\a, when public policy and funding decisions are made. 

Therefore, it is important to create enhcmced partnerships and teams both at the state 
and the regional levels. At the state level, the Montana Department of Commerce (DOC) 
Promotion Division (Travel Montana, or TM) is the lead agency (Figure 4.2). Key partners 
include the Tourism Advisory Council (TAC), Legislature, Tourism Regions, Convention & 
Visitors Bureaus (CVBs), University of Montana Institute of Tourism and Recreation 
Research (ITRR), the Montana Tourism & Recreation Initiative (MTRI, a state and federal 



Fig. 4.2: State Level Team* 




Teams 

* DOC = MT Dept, of Commerce; TM = Travel Montana' 
TM - Tourism Advisory Council: CVBs - Convention It 
Visitors Bureaus; MTRI = MT Tourism 4 Recreation 
Initiative (inter-ogency planning group including TM; 
FWP; MDT; MHS; MLCBC; HPDC; DNRC; MT Arts 
Council; TAC; U of MT; MSU; USPS; BLM; USFWS; 
COE; MPS; BOR; BIA); MTTA = MT Tribol Tourism 
Alliance; MTC = MT Tourism Coalition. 



Fig. 4.3: Regional Level Team 



.eat 



Regions 

Partners : 

;VBs/Chambers 

Businesses 

Cities/Counties 

AgenciesfTribes 

Nonprofits 



A 



Teams 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic I*lan 2003-2007 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



77 




'Long range regional/county/ 
community planning needs coordination 
on overlapping issues. ' 

Public meeting participant 



inter-agency planning group), the Montcina Tribal Tourism Alliance (MTTA) and Montana 
Tourism Coalition (MTC, a private-sector coalition). Implementation of the strategic actions 
described in Chapter 5 will require that this state-level team be expanded to include agencies 
and organizations who traditionally have not been involved in tourism (see next section). 

At the regional level, the Tourism Regions are the lead entity (Figure 4.3, previous page). 
Key partners include CVBs, chambers of commerce, businesses, cities, counties, local agency 
offices, tribes and nonprofit organizatioris (museums, cultural groups, events, etc.). At this 
level, too, the cast of characters needs to broaden in order to implement strategic actions. 

F.2 Many Players & Stakeholders Have Important Roles in the Strategic Flan 

The state and regional tourism management teams described in the previous section are 
the "core team" of players in the statewide tourism management network. But others need to 
be part of the process for the strategic goals to be achieved successfully. Each of these teams 
must expand their "rosters" and create a network that includes a state-level system of 
implementation partnerships, and six regional-level systems of implementation partnershif>s 
(Figure 4.4). Consistent cooperation and expanded collaboration among these entities, 
operating as a team, will ensure that the Strategic Plan does not just sit on a shelf. 



Fig. 4.4: Statewide Tourism Management Network 




At the state level, key partners outside the "core team" who 
need to be involved include other state and federal agencies, tribal 
representatives, legislative leadership or committee staff, statewide 
business trade associations, statewide economic development 
agencies and programs, statewide arts/cultural/historic 
orgariizations, and statewide wildlife/sportsmen's/conservation 
groups. 

Sidebar 4.1 on page 80 lists many of the public, private and 
nonprofit tourism stakeholder groups. Not every organization 
listed will be involved in every tourism-related action, but specific 
statewide actions will require collaboration with specific groups on 
a "big picture," broad policy level. Once "big picture" direction is 
established at the state level, much of the actual implementation 
will happen both at the state and regional levels. 



78 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



At the regional level, key partners outside the "core team" who need to be involved 
include the follovynng: 

♦ Local elected officials 

♦ Tribal representatives, tribal colleges 

♦ Local staff for state/federal agencies 

♦ Local & regional economic development organizations 

♦ Lewis & Clark Bicentermial groups 

♦ Local sportsmen's organizations 

♦ Local conservation organizatior^ 

♦ Local schools/youth 

♦ Special interest groups (bicycle clubs, etc.) 

♦ Interested citizens 

If representatives from these various stakeholder groups participate in plarming 
and implementation of specific actions identified in this Strategic Plan, the vision and 
goals identified by Montana citizens can be realized successfully. The anticipated results will be 
significant economic development benefits, and enhanced quality of life benefits, for all 
Montanans (Figure 4.6). 




State Capitol 



Fig. 4.5: Statewide Tourism Management Network and Its Residual Benefits 



The Benefits of an Enhanced Stotewide 
Tourism Management Network 

Figure 4.6 at right shows the statewide 
tourism management network described in 
this chapter, plus two "overlays" of 
benefits. Successful implementation of 
this enhanced tourism management 
network will result in achievement of the 
vision for tourism and recreation in 2007, 
in the context of the guiding principles. It 
also will provide economic development and 
quality of life benefits for all Montanans. 




Result of Network: 
Quality of Life Benefits 



Result of Network: 
Economic development Benefits 



Statewide Tourism 
Management Network 




Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



79 



Sidebor 4.1: Montona Tourism A Recreation Stakeholder Groups 


Blackfeet Tribe 


Montana Campground Owners Association 


Montana Tourism Coalition (MTC) 


Bureau of I Jtnd Management (ELM) 


MT Dept. of Agriculture (DOAg) 


Montana Tourism & Recreation Irutiative (MTRI) 


Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) 


MT Dept. of Commerce (DOC): 


Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance (M 1 1 A) 


Chambers of Commerce (CQ 


- Promotion Division 


Montana Wilderness Association 


Qark Fork Coalition 


- Business Resources Division 


Montana Wildlife Federation 


Convention & Visitors Bureaus (CVBs) 


MT Dept. of Fish, WUdlife & Parks (FWP) 


Montana Wildlife Society 


Custer Country 


MT Dept. of Labor & Industry (DLl) 


Montana/Wyonung Tribal Leaders Council 


Ducks Unlimited 


MT Dept. of Natural Resources/Conservation 


National Park Service (NPS) 


Fishing Outfitters Assn. of Montana (FOAM) 


MT Dept. of Revenue (DOR) 


National Parks Conservation Assn. 


Hathead Valley Community College 


MT Dept. of Transportation (MDT) 


Peoples Center (Flathead Reservation) 


Ft. Peck Reservation 


MT Economic Developers Assn. (MEDA) 


Predator Conservation Alliance 


Ft. Belknap Reservation 


Montana Education Association 


Rocky Boys Reservation 


Glader Country 


Montana Fish & Wildlife Commission 


Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF) 


Gold West Country 


Montana Governor's Office of Economic Oppf y 


Russell Country 


Greater Yellowstone Coalition 


Montana Grain Growers Association 


Salish/Kootenai Tribes 


Grown in Montana 


Montana Heritage Commission 


Small Business Development Centers (SBDQ 


I AC Bicentennial Commission 


Montana Historical Society (MHS) 


State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) 


- State Commission 


Montana Innkeepers Assn. (MIKA) 


Tour Operators (Off the Beaten Path, etc.) 


- Regional Bicentennial Commissions 


Montana League of Cities & Towns (MLL 1 ) 


Tourism Advisory Council (TAC) 


I AC Trail Heritage Foimdation Chapters 


Montana Legislature - Committee staff 


Trarwportation Carriers (Air, Rail, Bus, Car Rental) 


Little Shell Tribe 


Montana Office of Public Education 


Tribal Colleges 


Made in Montana 


Montana Outfitters & Guides Assn. (MOGA) 


Trout UrJimited 


Missoula Cultural Coimdl 


Montana Ranch Vacation Association 


University of Montana 


Missouri River Country 


Montana Recreation & Parks Assn. (MRPA) 


- Institute for Tourism & Rec'n Research 


MT Agricultural Business Assn. (MABA) 


Montana Restaurant Association 


- Bureau of Business & Economic Research 


Montana Arts Council (MAC) 


Montana Retail Association 


U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) 


Montana Assn. of Coimties (MACo) 


Montana Rural Development Partners 


U.S.D.A. Forest Service (USES) 


Montana BAB Association 


Montana Shares 


U.S.D.A. Rural Development (RD) 


Montana Beef Commission 


Montana Ski Areas Association 


U.S. Economic Development Admin. (EDA) 


Montana Community Foundation 


Montana Snowmobile Association 


U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) 


Montana Board of Outfitters (Licensing) 


Montana State University/Extension Service 


Walleyes Unlimited 


Montana Bowhunters Association 


Montana Stock Growers 


Yellowstone Country 



80 



Chapter 4: The Strategy 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Tourism and recreation in Montana has experienced extraordinary growth and success 
over the past decade. Led by the Montana Department of Commerce Promotion Division 
(Travel Montana), the Tourism Advisory Council and the Montana Tourism & Recreation 
Initiative (MTRI), many of the objectives and actions outlined in the previous two strategic 
plans have been thoughtfully initiated. Implementation has been successful in many areas, and 
should be continued. Tourism is a significant contributor to economic development and jobs in 
Montana. However, tourism and recreation also face a number of challenges and threats which 
must be addressed to ensure that the industry is sustainable, and consistent with the values of 
Montanans. 

As discussed in Chapters 2 and 3, Montana's economic and environmental conditions, 
and resident and nonresident markets, are changing. The objectives and actions described in 
this chapter are designed to be market-driven: to respond to the needs, priorities and trends of 
current and potential customers (Montanans and non-resident visitors), to address challenges, 
and to minimize threats. 

This chapter includes objectives, and actions to achieve them, in order to realize the 
vision for 2007. During the next five years, changes in "Demand" by resident and non-resident 
markets will necessitate adjustments and modifications to stakeholders' management of: 

■ Information collection/dissemination/exchange, and promotion/marketing emphasis 

■ Sustainable management of natural/historic/cultural assets and infrastructure 

■ Collaborative partnerships (teams) for effective planning and implementation 

Due to the large number of objectives and actions, the planning team has organized 
them into the three elements of the strategic framework: Managing Information, Managing the 
Use of Assets, and Creating Teams. Actions which are ongoing from current or previous efforts 
are mentioned in introductory text, and only new or expanded actions or initiatives are 
identified with specific action numbers. Key acronyms are listed at the bottom of each set of 
facing pages. Other acronyms are listed in Appendix A. Each objective includes a list of ways 
to measure the results, or progress, of implementation. Additional details about 
implementation, including a timeline, responsible partners and potential resources to pay for 
implementation, follow in Chapter 6. 



Chapter 5: 

Priority Objectives 
& Actions to 
Achieve Them 

A. Managing Information 

B. Managing (Use of) Assets 

C. Creating Teams 




Teams 



'Behold the turtle. He makes progress 
only when he sticks his neck out. ' 

- James Bryant Conont 




Montana Tourism & Rbcreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 5: PRioRmr Objectives & Actions 



81 



A. Managing Information 

A.l Maintain Lodging Tax through 

Anoreness of Its Uses. Benefits 
A. 2 Conduct Stpotegic Promotions 
A3 Create New Products through 

Pockoging 
A.4 Create New 'DestinatioRS* through 

Speciol Designations A Events 
A.5 Enhance Winter Products/Services 
A,6 Attract More A^eetings/Conventions 
A. 7 Enhance System of Tracking. 

Anolysis A Info Dissemination 
A. 8 Create System to Shore Informotion 

A Resources 






Information, n. 

1. knowledge communicated or received 
concerning a particular fact. 

2. knowledge goined through study, 
research, etc. 

3. computer data at any stage of 
processing. 

Source: Wcbstei's 



Xdditfonat sources of funding ore 
needed to address tourism facility 
and service needs, so that promotion 
dollars are not hemorrhaged to the 
point of ineffectiveness. 



A. Managing Information 

Information is power. Effective planning and decision-making require information. 
Successful business and recreation development requires information. The ability to balance 
sustainable use of natural/historic/cultural resources with protection of those assets requires 
information. Bad or incomplete information results in bad decisions, and bad development. 
Nationally and internationally, tourism and recreation are changing fast. The ability to respond 
to market changes requires information. Failure to respond to markets results in failed 
businesses and failed public facilities. Public policy decisions require information. Incomplete 
information results in bad public policy. Therefore, information - good information - is 
essential to the success of tourism and recreation in Montana. The following objectives and 
actions are designed to create an effective system of information collection and dissemination, 
in order to support good decisions, effective management, targeted promotion and rational 
public policy for tourism and recreation from 2003 to 2007 and beyond. 

A.l Objective: Maintain the Lodging Tax for Tourism Promotion & Development 
through Enhanced Awareness of Its Uses, and Tourism's Benefits & Impacts 

Montana's tourism promotion program is being outspent up to 10-to-l by other states. 
If Montana is to maintain its market share in tourism - and attract high-value, low impact 
visitors, especially during off-peak seasons - it must maximize the amount of its lodging tax 
dollars spent on promotion, and leverage those dollars with other partners. 

Tourism and recreation are "new" as a major economic force in Montana, compared to 
"traditional" economic sectors like agriculture, ranching, forestry and mining. Many citizens 
and elected officials are unfamiliar with state/national tourism issues and trends, and with the 
current uses of Montana's lodging tax. As discussed in Chapter 2, the lodging tax is similar to 
an agricultural commodity "check-off" program, providing funds for tourism marketing, 
research and industry/consumer education. Prior to 1987, tourism efforts were funded through 
the State General Fund. The lodging tax has provided resources for economic development and 
state promotion through tourism, without the use of General Fund revenues. 

Resident attitude and opinion research indicates that while most Montanans recognize 
the value of tourism to the state's economy, they are unsure about tourism's benefits and 
impacts on their community and quality of life. It is appropriate to inform Montanans about 



Ad-Ad Agency,A«n-AIUJCtioaBi7-Bu»ineM,BTA -BuslneM Trade Assn.t C-Oumbcr of Commerce,DIJ-Dcpl. o( 1 jbor & Ind..DOAg-Opl. of Ag,DOC-Depl. o< Comin«ce,tX>R-Depl. of Revcnue.Exl-F.xInuion Scrvlcr 

82 CuAfTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strateqc Plan 2003-2007 



tourism's impacts - and to build awareness of how their concerns about tourism are being 
addressed. In spring and summer of 2002, the Department of Commerce ran public service 
announcements called "Tourism: Good for Montauans-Good for Montana. " It is important to 
measure the results of these efforts to determine whether awareness or opinions have changed. 

Citizen involvement in tourism should be encouraged through programs like the Invite- 
A-Friend campaign, particularly targeting specific seasons, packages, activities or regions of the 
state. Efforts also should continue to encourage Montanans to be their own best customers by 
spending their money at home and "exploring their backyard." 



'H^e need to get Montanans to visit 
other areas of the state. A visit-your- 
neighbor program would be great and 
could be used to enhance our of f season. ' 
- Online Survey Porticipont 



Action A.1.1 : Build Citizen Awareness about the Benefitsllmpacts of Tourism & Uses of Lodging Tax 

Distribute information about the uses of lodging tax and benefits/impacts of tourism through 
printed material, press releases, tourism listserv (Action A. 8.1), Extension Service, economic development 
groups, schools, etc. Emphasize issues identified in citizen opinion research, and how concerns are being 
addressed. Show direct benefits to residents (e.g., jobs, taxes, support for State Parks). 

Plan and promote National Tourism Week activities statewide, along with other local/regional 
events to build citizen awareness of tourism. Send media releases about activities to local/regional 
media. Distribute accurate information about trends of nonresident sportsmen (e.g., number/economic 
impact of resident vs. nonresident hunting and fishing licenses sold) and funding needed for asset 
management. Responsibility: DOC, TR, CVB, FWP, Ext, BTA, Biz, Ad, NPO, MTC, ITRR, MTTA 



"Leadership is an action, 
not a word. " 

- Richard P. Coo ley 



Action A.1.2 : Build Awareness among Elected Officials about Tourism's Impacts & Benefits 

Provide reliable tourism and economic data to local chambers of commerce and organization 
leaders to share with members, constituents and elected officials. Send e-mail press releases to elected 
officials. Host a panel discussion or presentation about key tourism issues/trends at annual meetings of 
Montana Assn. of Counties and Montana League of Cities and Towns; listen to and discuss concerns 
related to impacts of tourism, Lewis & Clark Bicentennial, etc., and seek creative/collaborative ways to 
address them. At the local level, present information about tourism to meetings of city/county officials. 

Invite local and state elected officials to participate in educational events, such as tours. National 
Tourism Week events, press conferences and seminars, workshops or public meetings related to tourism 
and recreation. Continue to invite them to Tourism Advisory Council meetings, and include officials on 
mail/e-mail lists of tourism regions, so they are aware of tourism and recreation issues, activities and 
accomplishments within their constituency area. Continue to sponsor a Tourism Day at the Legislature, 
with follow-up questions of participating legislators to determine impact of event on their awareness of 
tourism issues. Responsibility: TR, CVB, DOC, TAC, MTC, BTA, MTRI, NPO, MTTA 



'Enhanced amireness is very important 
in order to maintain and grow tlie 
support necessary for the tourism 
industry. A thorough understanding 
about the impacts, benefits and 
fragility of the industry is the most 
secure way of insuring the 
sustainability. ' 

- Online Survey Participant 



FA-Federal Agency,Leg-Legislature,LG-Local Gov'I.I.O'Land Owners,MTC=Montana Tourism Coalilion,NI'0-Non-Profit Org'n,SA-Stale Agency,! AC-Tourism Advisory Council TR-Tounsm Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: Priortty Objectives & Actions 83 



'It seems as though a blanket attitude 
that tourism is somehow a panacea for 
the state 's historic economic doldnmts is 
implicit in the question. The public 
education component needs to address 
the adverse effects of tourism as well as 
the benefits. Can we maintain those 
values and qualities of life we cherish, 
while promoting tourism?' 

• Online Survey ParticJpont 



Action A.l.y . Seek Endorsements from Communities & "Non-Tourism" Organizations 

Share information about tourism's benefits, linkages and impacts with other economic and social 
sectors (agriculture, ranching, forestry, high-tech, retail, sportsmen, conservation). Obtain written 
endorsements supporting this Strategic Plan, and tourism's economic role, from communities and 
organizations such as transportation/freight carriers, food processors/ suppliers, retailers, manufacturers, 
wholesalers, agri-business and arts/cultural, sportsmen and conservation groups. Use endorsements to 
strengthen supf)ort for Strategic Plan implementation among elected officials. Responsibility: MTC 

Measures of Success for Objective A.l : 

♦ Results of resident attitude/opinion research about tourism 

♦ Number of tourism awareness programs/events held for citizens 

♦ Number of Invite-A-Friend packets ordered 

♦ Number of endorsements obtained from communities, organizations, businesses 

♦ Number of contacts/invitations sent to elected officials 

♦ Attendance of elected officials at educational events 

♦ Number of presentations to gatherings of officials 

♦ Number of responses from officials about tourism's economic/social benefits & impacts 



A.2 Objective: Conduct Strategic Promotions that Attract Top Priority Markets 

Chapter 3 highlighted national/state tourism trends, changes in markets, and top 
priority targets for 2003-2007, based on Montana's assets, opportunities and challenges. To 
respond to changing markets, Montana should conHnue to highlight its outstanding natural 
assets, while also ensuring that its culture, history and "creature comforts" are depicted (dining, 
shopping, architecture, wine-with-a-cork and fun for the whole family). Additionally, Montana 
should be depicted as a safe destination, with accommodafions, entertainment and amenities 
that range from "rustic" to "luxury." 

Promotion efforts led by the Department of Commerce have been highly successful over 
the past decade, as measured by conversion research and increases in visitation. State and 
regional image advertising should continue, with emphasis on advertising images and 
messages that target high-value, low-impact visitors such as heritage/cultural travelers, 
conventions, matures and families. Major attracfions such as national parks need to develop 
"fresh" packaging and marketing to attract visitors who have "been there, done that" 



Ad-Ad Agency ,A»ln-Altr»clion,BU-Bu»Jne»»,BTA -Buslnens Trade A»(in,CC-ChambCT oJ Commctce.DLI-Dept of I.abor & lnd.,DOAg-Depl. o< Ag,IXX-Dept. of Commerce.lXlR-lX-pl of Re\Tnuc,F.xt-Exlnttk)n Scrvkx 

84 CuArrERS: PRiORrrY Objectives & Actions Mont an a Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi an 2003-2007 



New travel markets should be penetrated using image advertising and publicity to 
generate interest. Once a potential traveler is "hooked," they will consult the Internet, AAA, 
travel guides and other sources for detailed information. High-impact print image ads can be 
cooperative efforts without becoming unsightly classified-ad style "logo competitions." Multi- 
page advertorials that appear as travel articles are highly effective for new markets. 

Montana has outstanding travel web sites for which they have received national 
recognition - and, more importantly, high ratings from visitors. Regional and local tourism 
web sites also are critical to tourism promotion, and could be enhanced with "one-click" 
vacation packages, and/or links to sites with low-cost airfares and booking capability. Focus 
groups and conversion research can help determine which aspects of web sites are most 
useful/desirable (or not), and how designs can be enhanced to best serve travelers. 

Montana has obtained extraordinary amounts of publicity from feature films (A River 
Runs Through It, Horse Whisperer, etc.) and media stories. Not all publicity has been positive 
(fires of 2000, drought), but negative stories are short-lived once they leave the headlines. The 
Montana Film Office maintains a web site, www.montanafilm.com, and an excellent Montana 
Film Location Guide. However, increasing competition and film production incentives from 
Canada and other states have cost Montana business in the film industry. 

The state tourism web site (www.visitmt.com) includes a "Top Stories" section with 
current news features about destinations across the state. Montana's media relations program 
should be highly aggressive, identifying and targeting journalists/media that produce features 
for top priority markets; and regularly send them story ideas, press releases and media clips. 

Many mature travelers prefer to travel with organized group tours, leaving the hassles 
of logistics and transportation to someone else. Montana promotes to the group market via 
online and hard copy group tour planning guides (www.montanagroups.com), familiarization 
("fam") tours, trade events, cooperative advertising and direct mail campaigns. 

International travelers, particularly Europeans, are attracted to Montana's scenic beauty, 
national parks, western heritage, outdoor recreation and legendary images of cowboys and 
Indians. In Summer 2001 alone, more than 170,000 overseas travelers visited Montana. The 
Department of Commerce participates in a four-state international marketing program. Rocky 
Mountain International (RMI), which targets western European visitors through promotion to 
tour wholesalers, travel media, travel agents and Internet consumers. Montana also promotes 
tourism through its international trade programs in Japan, Taiwan, China and Canada. 




Grand Canyon, Yellowstone NP 



Publicity is the least expensive and 
most effective form of advertising, 
next to word of mouth. 



FA-Federal Agency.Leg-legislafure.LOLocal Gov't,1.0-I^d Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism CoaliHon.NPO-Non-Profit Org'aSA-SUte Agency,? AC-Tourism Advlsoiy CoundLTR-Touttan Regions.Tfb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapters: Prjority Objectives & Actions 85 




William dark Signature at Pompeys Pillar 



The Department of Commerce and the regions/CVBs should continue to host seasonal 
"fam" tours and site visits for targeted media, group tour and international representatives, 
highlighting specific destinations/seasons/packages that Montana desires to showcase to build 
high-value, low impact tourism. Efforts to capitalize on opportunities for multi-state or cross- 
border promotion efforts (Rocky Mountain International trade events and promotions, Lewis & 
Clark events/marketing. Sled the Rockies, etc.) also should continue, as appropriate. 

Action A.2.1 : Coordinate Advertising to Maximize State, Regional & Private Return on Investment 

Plan state and regional advertising campaigns to coordinate with each other, and with private 
sector partners (when targeting similar geographic or demographic markets), in order to gain better 
space rates, larger impact and higher return on investment. Use strategies like travel advertorials to 
penetrate new markets. Responsibility: Ad, DOC, TR, CVB, Biz, Attn 



Action A.2.2 : Encourage Cross-Promotion between Tourism Partners & Sectors 

Encourage businesses, attractions and events to cross-promote each other, through packaging, 
"fam" tours (of media, front-line stafO, brochure exchanges, etc. Seek opportunities for cross-promotion 
between tourism/recreation and other Montana trade groups, corporations and/or products (Montana 
Beef Commission, Made-in-Montana). Responsibility: DOC, Ad, DOAg, NPO, TR, BTA, Trb, Biz 

Action A.2.3 : Consider Options for Film Production Incentives 

Prepare a report, with input from regions, CVBs, agencies and businesses, comparing film 
production incentives offered by other states and provinces, with recommendations about potential 
incentives that Montana might offer. Forward the report with an advisory policy recommendation to the 
appropriate entity(s). Responsibility: DOC, TAC, TR, CVB, Biz 

Action A.2.4 : Plan for Promotion of Special Events & Challenges 

Capitalize on the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial's Signature Events and Corps of Discovery I! with 
"add-on's" and incentives that encourage Bicentennial travelers to visit other parts of the slate. Work 
with the National Park Service and communities/businesses/tribes surrounding Glacier Park to develop 
packages and promotion plans that will encourage travelers to visit during reconstruction of Going-to- 
the-Sun Road. Address other special events and challenges (e.g., fires) as they arise. 
Responsibility: DOC, MLCBC, TR, CVB, NPS, Biz, Ad, FWP 



Measures of Success for Objective A.2 : 

Ad-Ad A|;cfKy.AHn-Attncttan,Biz-Bu5inew.BTA •Buainei* Trade AsMvCC-OuimbCT erf Commerce,DU-Depl. of labor & Ind.DOAg-Dept of Ag,rxx:-I)epl. of CommoTce.tXIR-Oepl. of Revenue.FxI-Exhroitan Service 

86 CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Number of cooperative promotions created 

Overall visitation numbers from targeted markets, seasons, etc. 

Conversion rates of advertising placements and web site visitors 

Satisfaction levels of web site and vacation guide users 

Results achieved by publicity efforts (gross impressions, column inches, dollar value, etc.) 

Number of "fam" tours/site visits hosted, results in terms of media/bookings generated 

Number of group tour and international bookings (through tour operators) 

Continued enhancements to film/media web sites, traffic generated & results 

Recommendations of film incentive report, and results 

Success of L&C packages and incentives, esp. to spread visitors around the state 



A.3 Objective: Create New Tourism & Recreation Products through Packaging 

Convenience sells. Consumers are looking for special packages and deals. Montana 
provides extraordinary variety and myriad opportunities for packaging of destinations and 
experiences into "one-call, all-inclusive" packages. Tourism regions and CVBs can assist 
businesses and attractions in working together to develop and market packages, perhaps by 
linking them with online travel services or travel agents to handle the booking and payment 
distribution logistics. In other states, tourism regions receive a percentage of the package 
booking price in exchange for their efforts to coordinate and market the packages. Weekend 
getaway packages are attractive to nearby markets (Boise, Denver, Salt Lake City, Portland, 
Seattle, Spokane, Minneapolis, Vancouver, Calgary and Regina). These markets contain 500,000 
- 2,300,000 people, many of whom seek opportunities for short getaways (3-5 days). 

Action A.3.1 : Assess Potential for Local/Regional Packages, & Coordinate Suppliers 

Identify opportunities to package attractions, accommodations, activities, events, meals and 
transportation, focusing on market needs, and on places or times of the year when additional business is 
needed (e.g., shoulder season weekends). Assess feasibility of marketing the packages to targeted high- 
value customer segments (matures, couples, nearby markets, cultural travelers, skiers, families, 
Canadians, etc.). Meet with potential suppliers (attractions, hotels, event planners, nonprofit 
organizations, etc.) to develop concepts, themes, guided tours, dates and marketing strategies. 
Coordinate development of packages, and logistics for booking/promotion (state/regional web sites, 
emailings, ads, Travelocity, etc.). Be creative with unconventional pairings of attractions ("dinosaurs and 



Pockoging Tourism A 
Recreation Products 

♦ Identify opportunities 

♦ Assess feasibility 

♦ Gather potential suppliers 

♦ Coordinate development of 
packages & logistics 

o Be creative 

o Focus on off-peak times 

♦ Market & book packages 



^SSBI 



FA-Fedetal Agency,Leg-Legisla(ure,LG-Local Gov't,I.O-ljmd Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalition,NI'0-Non-Profit Org'n,SA-SUIe Agency.TAC-Tourism Advisory Council TR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Rkcreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chai'Ter 5: Priortty Objectives & Actions 87 




Outdoor Symphony 



'Cultural tourism fits so well into 
the four-season visitor mode. ' 

- Public Comment on Draft Plan 



dining," "skiing and symphony"). Develop pre-planned, age-appropriate activities for kids as part of 
family camps or packages. Responsibilities: TR, CVB, Biz, Attn, NPO, DOC, Trb 

Action A3.2 : Promote Off-Peak Weekend Getaway Packages! Events to "Nearby" Markets 

Create all-inclusive, flexible packages to attract specific traveler segments in nearby metropolitan 
markets. Work with airlines and rail carriers that offer direct routes from these markets to develop 
packages with transportation (e.g.. United Vacations, Alaska Airlines Vacations/Specials, etc.). 
Responsibility: TR, Biz, CVB, DOC 

Action A.3.3 : Capture More Pass-Through Travelers with Mini-Packages 

Entice pass-through travelers to stop and spend more time in an area with mini-packages (for 
example, a "one price" all-day pass for the Great Falls Tour Trolley, Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center, 
CM. Russell Museum, Children's Museum of Montana and High Plains Heritage Center, including 
lunch and shopping coupons). Promote mini-packages through VICs, attractions, brochure racks, 
regional guides/web sites and businesses. Responsibility: Biz, CVB, Attn, TR, DOC, Trb, CC 

Measures of Success for Objective A.3 : 

♦ Visitation numbers at major destinations/attractions in Montana 

♦ Conversion rates of visitors who request package information 

♦ Changes in spending (jer visitor and spending per trip 

♦ Number of weekend packages booked 

♦ Number of specialty/niche/mini-package itineraries created and booked 

A.4 Objective: Create New "Destinations" with Special Designations & Events 

A "Destination" can be a specific site, attraction or community, or it can be a group of 
attractions, events and communities, such as a scenic byway, historic trail, loop tour or cultural 
corridor. A common trait of states who are Montana's major comp>etitors (Chapter 3, Section 
D.l) is their systems of scenic/historic/backcountry/tribal byways, scenic drives, loop tours, 
historic trails, heritage/cultural corridors and other special designations (e.g., U.S. 12 in Idaho - 
the Lewis & Clark Trail corridor - recently was designated as a National Scenic Byway). These 
special designations are highlighted on state/national maps (AAA, Rand McNalley), in travel 
articles/features, and they provide "destinations" for travelers seeking something sp>ecial. 



Ad-Ad AKnicy,At«n-Altraction.Blz*«ufln(W,BTA -Btutneu Trade A»!in,CC-Clvunber o< Conunetce.DLI-Depl. ot Labor & lnd.,tX)Ag-Dept. of Ag,lXX:-|}ept. of Ci»ninCTce,IX)R-l>rpl. o< Rrvenue.Ext-Extnwkm Service 

88 CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Mo^4T ana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



In Montana, Going-to-the-Sun Road and Beartooth Highway are such destinations, 
consistently named among the top scenic drives in the nation. Additionally, four cultural 
corridors in western Montana recently were created with Missoula as the "gateway" city, and 
will be promoted with CD ROMs, website and print materials (an effort funded by the 
Dept. of Commerce, Glacier Country, the U.S. Forest Service, Montana Arts Council, etc.). 
Montana's 2,000 miles of the Lewis & Clark Trail provide great potential for creation of sub- 
corridors and linkages between cultural and natural attractions. 

Major events can be "destinations" (e.g., the Olympics, NASCAR races, PGA 
Tournaments, etc.). National and international sports competitions provide opportunities for 
specific locations in Montana to be highlighted and increase visitation, whether the 
competitions take place in college/university stadiums, community bowling alleys, 
championship golf courses, city streets, lakes, general aviation airports or ski resorts. Events 
like road or mountain bike races, golf tournaments, soaring competitions, iron man/woman, ski 
races, professional rodeo and others draw visitors from across the state and country to specific 
locations at targeted times of the year. 

Action A.4.1 : Work with MDT & Legislature to Implement Montana Scenic/Historic Byway Program 

Encourage MDT and the Montana Legislature to implement the Montana Byways program, so 
that highways in Montana can be designated as state scenic/historic byways, and become eligible for 
federal byways funding for planning, enhancements, improvement projects and marketing. Coordinate 
the MDT program efforts with the existing U.S. Forest Service National Forest Scenic Highway Program, 
the Bureau of Land Management Backcountry Byway Program and the proposed Tribal Byways 
Program. Responsibility: MDT, TR, Trb, NPO, Biz, MHS, CVB, LG, CC, DOC 

Action A.4.2 : Use Collaborative Efforts to Create Special Designation Areas 

Form planning groups along proposed scenic/historic/tribal/backcountry byway corridors and 
loops to begin the designation process. Focus on communities/regions that desire additional tourism as 
an economic development strategy, and have the capacity to handle additional traffic without negatively 
impacting local residents. Seek local public input to establish values and parameters for corridor or 
byway designation, and respect community heritage and character. Develop byway/corridor plans and 
marketing strategies. Responsibility: MDT, TR, CC, CVB, DOC, NPO, Trb, LG, Biz 
Action A.4.3 : Seek Opportunities to Host National/International Sports Competitions 



Byways, Corridors d Property Rights 

Though some states have taken a 
regulatory approach to property use and 
development within designated 
scenic/historic/backcountry byways or 
corridors, the federal Byways and 
Corridors programs actually do not require 
it. 

FHWA allows designation in the context 
of voluntary guidelines , so that property 
rights issues are not obstacles to the 
program. There are several models of 
successful corridor/byway development 
using mutually-agreed upon voluntary 
guidelines which preserve the integrity of 
the designation, while still albwing 
reasonable property use and development. 



FA-FederdI Agency,l*g-l^slature,LG-Local Ck)v't.l.O-l-and Owners.MTC-Monlana Tourism Coalilion,NPC>Non-Profil Org'n^A-Slate Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CounciLTR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaithrS: PKioRrr4 0BjEcnvES& Actions 89 



Identify opportunities to utilize existing developed facilities to host sports competitions at times 
when facilities are underutilized. Examples are college/university stadiums, general aviation airports, 
rodeo arenas, rural roads/trails, lakes, golf courses, downhill/XC ski facilities, etc. Contact sports 
associations or federations to explore possibilities for events to be hosted in Montana. 
Responsibility: CVB, Biz, TR, DOC, LG 

Measures of Success for Objective A.4 : 

♦ Implementation of Montana Byways program 

♦ Number of special designation areas created and promoted 

♦ Visitation changes in special designation areas 

♦ Number of sports competitions hosted 




Discovery Ski Arta 



A.5 Objective: Enhance Montana's Winter Recreation Products/Services 

According to ITRR's 2000-2001 research, wfinter visitation increased about 5% from 1993 
to 2001, including a decline of about 24% from 1993-1998, then recovery/growth of 37% from 
1998-2001. The decline corresponded to changes in the value of the Canadian dollar, and the 
recovery/growth corresponded to new ski resort development in Montana and the increasing 
popularity of snowmobiling. Montana's winter recreation product continues to diversify with 
outdoor activities like Winterfests, train rides, ice fishing and boating, and indoor activities like 
shopping, trade and gun shows, museums, expositions, rodeos, arts events, holiday festivals, 
bazaars, light shows and parades. The Department of Commerce promotes winter activities via 
the web (www.wintermt.com), winter travel guidesArochures, a cooperative snowmobile 
promotion with Wyoming and Idaho called "Sled the Rockies," and advertising. 

Action A.5.1 : Refine Montana's Niche in the Destination Ski Market & Snowmobile Markets 

Refine Montana's image in the destination ski market versus the competition (Utah, Colorado, 
Idaho, Canadian Rockies), in the context of desired target markets. If needed, use research (such as focus 
groups) to determine types and origins of desirable destination skiers most likely to ski in Montana, and 
to refine the images, messages and packages that most appeal to them. Similarly, determine types and 
origins of destination snowmobilers most likely to be high-value, low impact visitors, and promote 
packages that direct them to targeted areas for snowmobiling. Responsibility: DOC, BTA, Ad, Biz 



Action A.5.2 : Package Skiing & Snowmobiling with Other Activities 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Alln-Attnctkin.Biz-BiulncH.BTA -Btulnetis Trade A»»n,CC-Chamber of Conunerce,DLI-Depl. of Labor & liKl.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,[XX:-r)epl. of Camtnerc»,IX1R-l)ept. of Revenue.KxI-Exterorton Servior 

90 ChaiterS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Once the ski and snowmobile niches are refined, package skiing and snowmobiling with other 
activities, depending on the targeted customers (arts/history, events, shopping, kids activities, music 
festivals, competitions, etc.). Promote packages to bolster business during slow times of year. 
Responsibility: BTA, TR, CVB, Biz, Attn, NPO 

Action A.5.3 : Expand "Alternative" Winter Activities 

Identify existing and potential opportunities to increase alternative indoor and outdoor activities, 
such as ice skating/fishing, snowshoeing, dog sledding, hot springs, arts/cultural/historical events and 
attractions, etc. Package and promote to targeted resident and nonresident markets. Responsibility: TR, 
CC, CVB, Trb, Biz, Attn, NPO 

Measures of Success for Objective A.5 : 

♦ Skier days at Montana's destination resorts 

♦ Snowmobile visitor days at targeted locations 

♦ Alternative winter activities/events/packages offered 

♦ Visitation and hotel sales during winter months 




Absaroka Dog Sledding 



A.6 Objective: Attract More Meetings & Conventions to Montana 

Montana has a tremendous variety of meeting and convention facilities, from large 
convention hotels to small resorts and guest ranches for corporate retreats. Nationally, the 
average meeting size is about 50 participants, so many communities in Montana are capable of 
hosting meetings and small conferences. One of Montana's biggest challenges in this market is 
accessibility: the availability and cost of transportation (air service). This fact cannot be 
ignored, although once participants arrive, they can experience good value at their destination. 
Another challenge is a lack of state-of-the-art facilities: corporate meetings often expect broad- 
band access (at each seat in the meeting room), high-tech audio/visual equipment, video 
conferencing, etc. These services are not available in most Montana meeting facilities. 

Meeting participants like to experience attractions outside the walls of their conference 
hotel. Variety and creativity are keys to attracting conference attendees and ensuring that they 
will return. Many associations use annual meetings as fundraising events, so the more 
interesting the meeting agenda and venues, the more participants they will attract, and the 
more money they will make. Creative destination packages are attractive to meeting planners. 



Business conference participants 
arc potential targets for 
business recruitment. If they 
like the community, they may 
become interested in expanding 
their business to Montana. 



FA-Federol AgeiKy,Leg-Ugislature,LC-tocal Gov't,I.O-t.and Owners.MTC-Monlana Tourism Coalition.NPO-Non-Profit Org'n,SA-SUIe Agency.TAC-Tourism Advisory Council. TR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Trlbw 

Montana Tourism &RtCREATioN Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chai'TerS: Priority Objectives & Actions 91 




Convention at West Yellowstone 



Moreover, business conference participants are potential targets for business recruitment. If 
they like the community, they may become interested in expanding their business to Montana. 

Montana's meeting promotions, such as the meeting planners' guide and web site 
(www.montanameetings.com), should be continued, along with targeted, cooperative 
advertising. Montana needs a strong "presence" at trade events, targeting those events that 
match Montana's niche in the market. Creative direct mail campaigns, involvement of 
transportation carriers, and testimonials from previous meeting planners or participants also 
can help generate additional leads and bookings in Montana. 

As the market for business meetings and trade shows has softened nationally, 
competition has increased. Non-business meetings are an attractive alternative, but Montana 
businesses and marketing organizations like CVBs, chambers and Department of Commerce 
must work together to successfully gain their share of this lucrative market. Efforts will best 
succeed with a strong public-private partnership (state, regions, CVBs, businesses and 
transportation carriers) to promote Montana to the meeting/convention market. 



Action A.6.1 : Refine Montana's Niche and "Brand" in the Meeting/Convention Market; Determine 
Feasibility of Enhanced Meeting & Convention Facilities 

Conduct research on a sampling of meeting/convention planners to identify relative or perceived 
strengths and weaknesses of Montana's convention product for different types of groups. Use the results 
to refine Montana's niche in the meeting/convention market. Then implement consistent and cohesive 
marketing efforts targeting them, such as direct mail and sales efforts. Based on results of the research, 
conduct analyses to determine the need for, and feasibility of, expanded/upgraded/new meeting and 
convention facilities in Montana. Responsibility: CVB, DOC, BTA, Biz, Ad, LG 

Action A.6.1 : Conduct Training on the Needs & Trends of Meeting/Convention Markets 

Educate Montana businesses about the expectations of meeting planners (based on research 
results), the meeting/convention markets Montana is best suited to serve, and changes/upgrades needed 
to serve new markets. Expand the "Invite-a-Convention" program to involve citizens, businesses and 
colleges/universities in identifying convention groups to recruit to Montana. Implement a "Convention 
Host" training/reward program to encourage participation. Responsibility: CVB, DOC, Biz, BTA, Univ 



Ad-Ad Ag«fKy.AMn-A«lractloti.Bb:-Bu»lne».BTA •Businm Tr*d* AMaCC-ChambCT of Commerce.DU-DepL of Labor k Ind.,DOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC.l>pl. of Commer«,DOR-Dept. of Rf venuc.F.xt-F.xlctv.*oo Swvtoe 

92 CHAPTERS: PRioRfTY Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi.an 2003-2007 



Action A.6.3 : Use Local Historical/Cultural Attractions to Enhance Venue Offerings 

Work cooperatively to use local historic/cultural attractions, sites and guided services as 
interesting venues for meeting and convention receptions/events, and to provide exposure and revenue 
for those attractions/services. Create annual statewide CVB/venue awards for creativity. Use creative 
ideas in convention promotions. Responsibility: CVB, TR, Biz, Attn, MAC, MHS, NPO 

Measures of Success for Objective A.6 : 

♦ Number of meetings and conventions booked 

♦ Outcomes of research on meeting/convention market 

♦ Outcomes of feasibility analyses for expanded/new facilities 

♦ Number of training programs offered & attendance 

♦ Number of partnerships with historical/cultural venues initiated 

♦ Creation of CVB/venue awards program for creativity 

A.7 Objective: Enhance System of Tracking, Analysis & Information 

Dissemination about Tourism Trends, & Implications for Stakeholders 

To maximize the return on investment in tourism promotion, it is important to know 
which are the high-value, low impact visitors, which are not, and how trends have changed 
over time. Data collection, management and analysis is time-consuming and costly, but it also 
is extremely critical in deciphering trends, and identifying implications for management and 
marketing decisions. 

The University of Montana's Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research (ITRR) and 
Bureau of Business & Economic Research (BBER) have conducted numerous studies to measure 
resident travel habits/spending, nonresident visitation, economic impacts, visitor activities, 
satisfaction levels and resident attitudes toward visitors on a statewide and regional basis. The 
research indicated widespread recognition among residents of tourism's important role in 
Montana's statewide economy. This information is critical to economic development planning 
and public policy decisions. 

Department of Commerce and its ad agency also have conducted conversion research to 
determine the number and characteristics of visitors who respond to state promotions, and to 
measure the return on investment of marketing efforts. Many of Montana's attractions and 




€<ites of the Mountains Boot Tour 



"/4 problem well stated is a problem 
half solved' 



-Charles F. Kettering 



'If you don't measure results, you 
can't tell success from failure. If 
you can't see success, you can't 
reward it. If you can 't reward 
success, you're probably rewarding 
failure. ' 

- David Osborne & Ted 6aebler, 
Reinventing Government 



FA-Federal Agency,l^-l,egislalure,LG-Local Gov't,1.0-Land Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalilion,NI\>Non-Profil Org'n3A-Stale Agency.TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncilTR-Tourism Regions,Trb-Tribe» 

Montana Tourism &RkcreationStratkcic Plan 2003-2007 ChaitkrS: Prioritv Objectives & Actions 93 



Recommendations for Future Research 

A significant omount of insightful Inf ormotton con 
be obtained from the nonresident traveler studies 
sunvnorized in Chapter 3: hoivever, the following 
information would be useful for tourism 
development and promotion decision-making: 

• Ape of Trovelers : to distinguish between 6en X. 
6en y. Baby Boomers, Matures, etc. 

• Occuootion : to determine needs/impocts of 
retirees, professionols, college students, etc. 

• Zip Code : to determine which major metro artas 
represent signif icont markets 

• Lond Ownership : to decipher the number of 
travelers visiting vocation home property 

• ComDorotive Vakie : to compare spending of 
visitors from different states, different trip 
purposes, and different activity interests (e.g., 
whKh types and origins of travelers stay the 
longest, spend the most money) 

• Comporotive Interests : to compare the trip 
purposes and activities of visitors from various 
states/provinces (e.g., which activities art of 
most interest to Californians, vs. Colorodons?) 

• Comporotive Imooct : to compare which types & 
origins of taiveiers spend o tet of time, but not 
money - or create impocts on key assets 

• Regional bato in MT : to determine differences 
in nonresident traveler types/origins/interests 
in each of Montana's six tourism regions 

ftecommendotions for Future Research/Analysis: 

• Collect information about traveler ages, 
occupations, zip codes, kind ownership in MT 

• Collect sufficient sample sizes to analyze 
comporotive spending, interests and impacts of 
visitors from vorious stotes, types, etc. 

• Collect sufficient sample sizes to analyze dato 
by tourism region seasonally in Montana 







VICs track visitor data, but most do not consistently capture information other than visitor 
numbers. State-funded VICs track monthly visitor numbers and origins. 

Lodging sales and occupancy rates are important measures of tourism trends, and 
indicators of economic development activity. Lodging sales/tax collections are reported to 
Montana Department of Revenue, but only on a quarterly basis, so they cannot be analyzed 
seasonally, or compared to ITRR's tourism trends research. 

There is no central "clearing-house" for systematic collection and analysis of data from 
public/private/nonprofit/tribal sources, and analysis and dissemination of implications for 
decision-makers. Nor is there a statewide "inventory," or baseline database, of tourism-related 
accommodations, attractions and infrastructure to track "product inventory." Moreover, 
consistency is needed in data-gathering methods at Montana's attractions in order to 
determine trends in numbers, sales, characteristics and impacts of visitors to sites. 

Action A. 7.1 : Continue Strategic Research about Resident & Nonresident Travelers 

Every three to four years, repeat research about Montanans' travel habits, spending and trends. 
Include analyses of data by season and region/state of destination. Conduct the next study in 2003 or 
2004 to measure changes in travel t»ehavior that may have l)een influenced by the statewide "Visit Your 
Backyard" campaign in 2002, and another study in 2006/2007 to measure the impacts of resident travel 
associated with the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial. 

Continue four-season nonresident visitor research, with the following additions: expand data 
collection to obtain sample sizes for data analyses by region, activity and visitor type from key states of 
origin. Collect visitor zip codes, in order to determine key metropolitan areas of origin. Analyze the 
comparative value and impacts of visitors from different states, activity participants, destinations and 
traveler types (see sidebar). Gather information about property ownership in Montana. Consider 
allowing tourism regions to add mini-modules of 6-8 questions specific to their region as part of the 
survey research (e.g., Lewis & Clark visitation), as part of a cooperative funding effort. 

Use nonresident visitor research to measure the value of tourism to Montana's economy. 
Additionally, conduct research to measure the economic impacts of specific attractions and events, 
particularly during the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial (e.g., Signature Events), and of specific visitor 
segments, such as the meeting and convention market, group tour market, heritage/cultural visitors or 
nonresident property owners. Responsibility: ITRR, BBER, DOC, TAC, TR, MLCBC, SA, FA, Biz 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Aftn-Altra<:tioaBU-Bo»in«w.BTA -BunincM Trade A »»n.CC -Chamber of Commerce.lJI.I-IJepI of I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commerce.DOR-Depl. of Revenue.Exl-Fjitmsion S«rv»a 

94 CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & RECREAnoN Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Action A.7.2 : Regularly Measure Montanans' Opinions about Tourism & Recreation 

Regularly measure Montanans' attitudes and perceptions about tourism to provide insights and 
guidance on whether concerns are being addressed successfully, and to identify opportunities to 
communicate with residents about tourism issues. Conduct the next study in 2003 to measure changes in 
attitudes that may have been influenced by the statewide "Good for Montanans" advertising campaign 
in 2002. Continue agency efforts to regularly and systematically gather and evaluate public input about 
past/current/future management of natural, historic and cultural assets. Moreover, continue efforts to 
obtain input from Montanans about current public/private land regulation issues. Use this information 
to review and evaluate refinements to tourism and recreation management and marketing programs. 
Responsibility: ITRR, DOC, TAC, MTRI, SA, FA, Biz 



Public comments have helped the Forest 
Service leorn of opportunities for 
improving the program. 

- USPS Fee Demo Program Summary 



Action A.73 : Conduct Regular Conversion Research to Measure Results of Marketing Efforts 

Conduct regular state and regional conversion research to determine the characteristics and 
decision-making habits of potential and converted travelers to Montana, and return on investment (ROI) 
of state/regional marketing efforts. Coordinate this research with other nonresident studies to allow for 
comparing/contrasting results. For non-visitors, capture information about other vacation destinations 
(where they traveled instead of Montana, and why). Responsibility: DOC, TR, CVB, ITRR, Ad 



The only real measure of Return on 
Investment (ROI) for promotion 
efforts is conversion reseorch. The 
number of inquiries is an inadequote 
measure of promotion success. 



Action A.7.4 : Establish a Central "Clearinghouse" for Data Collection, Analysis & Reporting 

Create a Montana Tourism & Recreation Data Center (MTRDC), perhaps as part of ITRR, to 
regularly collect information from state and national sources, analyze it, and disseminate results of 
analyses and trends to stakeholder groups. Work with stakeholders to determine information 
tyjTCs/formats to collect, and results that are most needed for strategic decision-making on a monthly, 
quarterly and annual basis. Develop a data tracking format that is compatible across agencies/sites so 
information can be used by stakeholders for statewide and regional analyses, and for collaborative 
decision-making about management and marketing. 

Additionally, use the Data Center to compile and disseminate the results of research and trends, 
and to compare research results to statewide data collected by stakeholders. Also compile, summarize 
and disseminate the results of tourism/recreation research from other sources (TIA, U.S. Travel Data 
Center, American Recreation Coalition, America Outdoors, American Hotel & Motel Assn., state/federal 
agencies, etc.). Focus on interpreting and formatting information so that it is user-friendly and insightful 
for Montana's tourism and recreation stakeholder groups. Create an online newsletter for interactive 
dissemination of information. Responsibility: ITRR, DOC, TR, MTRI, MTTA, CVB, Attn, Biz 



Knowledge Saps: 'What managers mean 
by adequate and relevant research and 
what researchers can do to provide it 
as part of program evaluation efforts.' 

- USFS Executive Summary, Issues & 
Concerns Related to Fee Demo Program 

'There's a biff difference between data 
and information. " 

- stakeholder Written Comment 



FA-Federal Agency,Leg-[.egislature,LC-Local Gov'l,LO-Land Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism CoaliUon.NPO-Non-Profit C)rg'n.SA-SUte Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CoundlTR-Touriam RegionSkTit^Tribcs 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapters: Priority Objechves & Actions 95 



'Targeted research: the 
gateway to accountability. ' 

- Travel 4 Tourism Research hitn. 



Action A.7.5 : Create a Statewide "Baseline" Database of Tourism & Recreation Assets 

Use data from the Department of Revenue, Department of Commerce, regions/CVBs and other 
state/federal agencies to create a central "master database" that is capable of sorting tourism and 
recreation assets (facilities, attractions, accommodations and infrastructure) by county, type, size, 
amenities and ownership type (private, public, tribal, nonprofit). Use the database for online marketing 
(for customer searches), tracking of visitation trends, and changes in the inventory over time. 
Responsibility: ITRR, DOC, TR, DOR, MTRI, MRPA, BTA, MTTA 



Agencies need to design data 
collection systems which provide 
good, current information on user 
preferences, participation rates and 
other topics. 

- Montana 2001 State Trails Plan 



Action A. 7. 6 : Enhance Data-Gathering Systems at Attractions & VICs 

Enhance the system of data-collection at state-supported VICs, supplemented by an effort to 
broaden a standardized data-collection system to other VICs and attractions (chambers, agency visitor 
centers, etc.), in order to allow insightful and timely analyses of statewide and regional visitation trends. 
Include data about the origin of visitors by zip code, trip purpose, size of travel party, destinations, 
activities, etc. Compare/contrast the data to results of traveler research. Responsibility: DOC, ITRR, 
MTRI, TR, VIC, CVB, CC, Trb 

Action A.7.7 : Upgrade Lodging Tax Reporting Systems at Montana Department of Revenue 

Enhance the lodging tax reporting system so that properties report monthly sales and tax 
collections, and Department of Revenue (DOR) codes the lodging sales/tax collections by month, county 
and projjerty type (lodging versus RV/campground). Provide reports from DOR to Department of 
Commerce, ITRR and tourism regions, so that sales trends can be compared to monthly visitation trends 
and visitor research. Obtain input from business trade associations to determine business attitudes about 
submitting monthly reports in exchange for more timely tourism trend data. Responsibility: DOR, DOC, 
BTA, ITRR. 



Action A.7.8 : Coordinate with the Private Sector for Enhanced Tracking/Reporting 

Encourage chambers and CVBs to collect general trend information from their member 
properties, compile it for analyses of key trends, and forward general trends to ITRR or Department of 
Commerce to analyze statewide trends. Include general information that properties are likely to share, 
such as changes in sales over previous month/year (up or down within a percentage range), traveler 
types, origins, group sizes, length of stay, etc.). Provide simple, standardized spreadsheets that can be 
completed quickly from standard monthly business reports. Use insights to adjust targeting of 
promotions for more effective results. At the state level, use the data as a regular "Travel Barometer", 
and include trend data in press releases to media. Responsibility: CVB, CC, TR, BTA, DOC, ITRR 



Ad- Ad Agency .Attn-Attnctian.Blz-BiiiincM.eTA -Biuinc** Trade AMn,CC-Ouunber of Commerce.DU-Dept. of Labor k Ind.,CX3Ag-Dept. of Ag,tXX:-t>epl. of Commorce.DOR-nepl. of Revenuc.FxI-Extension Scrvtoc 

% CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Measures of Success for Objective A.7 : 

Creation of a Montana Tourism & Recreation Data Center 

Creation/maintenance of a baseline database of accommodations/attractions 

Establishment of standardized/enhanced data-gathering at attractionsA'ICs 

Upgrades to tax reporting system at DOR 

Success in obtaining trend information from businesses for "Travel Barometer" 

Changes in citizen opinions, attitudes and travel habits/spending 

Expansion of nonresident visitor research 

Results of regular conversion research, and comparisons to nonresident research 

Quality, usefulness & regularity of information disseminated by Data Center 



A.8 Objective: Create a Connected System to Share Information & Resources 

Communication and networking are essential to successful tourism and recreation in 
Montana. Many resources are available to stakeholders, but often, information about the 
resources is not widely available, or there are disconnects in communication between agencies, 
sectors, organizations that provide support, and those who need support or assistance. An 
integrated system to share information and resources will strengthen the quality of tourism 
facilities, services and promotion efforts statewide. 

Action A. 8.1 : Create a Tourism & Recreation Listserv to Share Information 

Establish a listserv for any/all tourism and recreation stakeholders who wish to participate, and 
share information about research, visitor data, trends, announcements, seminar content from 
national/international meetings, etc. Additionally, provide information from stakeholders to each other 
and the public via organization newsletters, meetings and press releases. Responsibility: ITRR, DOC, 
MTC, MTRI, MTTA, TR, NPO 

Action A.8.2 : Create a Database of Tourism/Recreation Technical & Funding Resources 

Develop a database of tourism and recreation-related resources for funding and technical 
assistance which are available to businesses and non. 

profit organizations (see Appendix C). If practical, collaborate with existing organizations who provide 
resource sites, such as the Department of Commerce's Montana Finance Information Center website 



'I fee/ it is important that the 
residents of Montana are involved in 
tourism and recreation in Montana. " 
• Online Survey Participant 



FA-Federal Agency.Leg-Legislahire.LG-Local Gov'tLO-Und Owners,MTC«Montana Tourism CoaliUon.NlWNon-Profit Org'aSA-SUle Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncaTR-Tourism Regions.Trt>-Tribes 

Montana Tourism &RBCREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 CnAPTtR5: Priority Objectives & Actions 97 



(www.mtfinanceonline.com), the Montana Economic Developers Association (MEDA), University of 
Montana Bureau of Business and Economic Research (BBER, www.bber.umt.edu), Montana Rural 
Development Partners (MRDP) and Montana Department of Labor & Industry. Responsibility: DOC, 
MEDA, BBER, MRDP, DLI 

Action A.8.3 : Share Information about State/ Regional Advertising Plans to Facilitate Coordination 

Schedule meetings to share information about Department of Commerce advertising plans with 
regions/CVBs, and vice-versa, before state and regional marketing plans are finalized. Discuss ideas for 
mutual target markets, cooperative efforts, and ways to effectively track and measure results of high- 
impact cooperative efforts (conversions, ROI). Additionally, share information with businesses who also 
may want to participate in cooperative advertising efforts for image campaigns and advertorial features. 
Responsibility: DOC, Ad, TR, CVB, Biz 

Action A.8.4 : Enhance Sharing of Tourism & Recreation Photo Libraries 

Maximize the use of funds for tourism photography by creating a central online photo library for 
tourism stakeholder groups to use. Encourage Department of Commerce, regions, CVBs, nonprofit 
organizations and other state/federal agencies to contribute to and use the online library via electronic 
file sharing. Responsibility: DOC, TR, CVB, NPO, MTRI 

Measures of Success for Objective A.8 : 

♦ Establishment and use of listserv in 2003 

♦ Establishment of central online photo library, and amount of use 

♦ Creation, dissemination and updating of resource database 

♦ Regional/Dept. of Commerce advertising planning meetings beginning in 2003 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Ann-AitractkifvBiz-Businefi,BTA -BtuincM Trade Amn.CC'Ouinber o< Conunetce.Dl J-I>cp(. o< I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,tXX:-Depl. of ComniCTce.DOR-Dept. of Revenue.Ext-Exteiwkm Swvke 

98 Chapter 5: PRioRmr Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism It Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



B. Managing the Use of Assets 



Sustainability. High quality. Preservation. Responsible, shared use. Maintenance and 
operations. Access. Balance. Becauseof its vast, rural land base, Montana's tourism and 
recreation assets are linked to its extraordinary mountains, forests, rivers, lakes and plains, as 
well as to its outstanding historic and cultural assets. Managing the use of those assets is a 
complex and difficult balancing act, often invoking strong and diverse opinions among 
Montanans. Chapter 2 discusses the natural/historic/cultural/man-made assets that support 
tourism and recreation, as well as asset management challenges and threats. This section lists 
priority actions that are designed to address the challenges of sustainable asset management, 
based on input from public meetings, agencies and numerous stakeholder groups. 

Outreach efforts by the planning team found overwhelming interest in, and support of, 
best-practices management and minimal negative impact on Montana's natural, historic and 
cultural assets. Montanans expressed that tourism and economic growth/jobs are generally 
desirable for the state, but that increasing visitation and population growth must be balanced 
with sustainability. Moreover, maintenance of tourism and recreation-related infrastructure for 
both resident and nonresident use is paramount to successful tourism and economic 
development in Montana. 

Rising population and visitor numbers mean increased use of natural and man-made 
assets, and accelerated costs for infrastructure, staffing, maintenance, interpretation, waste 
removal and utilities. As demand increases, additional and reliable resources are necessary. 

Certain lands and waters in Montana are specially designated by the state or Congress 
for restricted use and development (i.e. wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, primitive 
areas, endangered species habitat, wetlands, etc.). Use of public land is largely determined 
through agency planning processes, and by law, the public must be included in the process of 
developing these plans. Unfortunately, timely completion and implementation of these plans 
often is inhibited by agency funding and/or staffing challenges, appeals and lawsuits. 

This section of Chapter 5 lists actions (many of which are currently ongoing and 
successful), to achieve sustainable management strategies, reduce negative impacts, and 
protect/improve Montana's natural and man-made assets. 



B. 


Managing the Use of Assets \ 


B.l 


Balance Asset Protection & 




Visitor/Business Needs 


B.2 


Address Access Issues on Public 




& Private Lands/Waters g 


B,3 


Develop an Enhanced ■ 




Transportation System H 


B.4 


Create a Comprehensive i 




"System" of Visitor Information 


B.5 


Improve Statewide System of 




Highway Signs 


B.6 


Assist Communities with Tourism 




while Respecting Local Values 



"Assets" vs. "Resources" 

The words 'asset" and "resource" ore 
used in many contexts. For the 
purposes of this Strategic Plan 
document, "assets* refer to natural, 
historical and cultural attributes, 
places or events that visitors seek m 
Montana. Assets also include tourism 
and recreation infrastructure, such as 
roods, rest areas. VICs, airports and 
transportation corriers, and community 
assets, like porks, golf courses, 
historic downtowns, etc. 

"Resources* refer to sources of 
support or aid, such as funding, 
information, education and technical 
assistance. 



FA-Federal Agency,Leg-Legislature,LG-Local Gov'l,LO=l,and Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalilion.NI'O-Non-Profil Org'aSA-SUIe Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncU.TR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: Priority Objectives & Actions 99 



B.l Objective: Seek Balance Between Asset Protection & Visitor/Business Needs 



'Tourism must recognize the need for a 
balance between capacity and demand. 
Somewhere the industry needs to state 
and recognize capacity and crowding 
issues, and either identify that they will 
balance increased opportunities with 
resource capacity and demand, or need to 
support the addition of more lands to the 
public access system - and even doing that 
needs to be balanced with wildlife and 
social impact concerns. ' 

• PublK Cofiunent on Draft Plon 



...communities ore demonstrating that 
economic prosperity doesn't have to 
degrade natural surroundings, rob them of 
their character, or turn them into 
crowded tourist traps. 

- Sotetvay Communities, Edword T. McMahon, 

Spring 1999 



Sustainable use and protection of Montana's natural, historic and cultural assets must be 
balanced with the needs of Montana residents, businesses and visitors. The process to achieve 
this balance requires stewardship and cooperation, and entails an inventory/evaluation of assets 
and needs; planning and policy development; regulation/licensing where necessary; and 
monitoring of use and its impacts. Montanans are accustomed to unlimited access to many 
natural assets, yet as both resident and nonresident use has increased, limits may be necessary 
to protect the places that Montanans value so highly. Along with evaluating the physical 
impacts on assets, local values and multiple use also must be considered in determining desired 
visitation levels. 

The number of guided outdoor recreation businesses has increased in Montana (rafting, 
kayaking, biking, hiking, horse trips, etc.) as more residents and nonresidents seek professionals 
to provide the equipment, skills and interpretation that they lack to enjoy the outdoors. In 
many places, land/river managers cannot determine the number of businesses or visitors using 
a specific area (such as the Blackfoot River east of Missoula) because there is no licensing or 
reporting mechanism. 

Action B.I .2; Compile an Inventory/Evaluation of Natural/Historic/Cultural Assets & Facilities 

Conduct a survey of natural/historic/cultural asset and facility managers to gather information 
about existing assets, their current conditions, needs and threats (outdoor recreation facilities are 
included in the FWP SCORP' process). Compile an inventory of key assets as part of a statewide 
database (see Action A. 7.5). Evaluate and prioritize conditions, needs and threats, and determine 
estimated costs to address them. Determine list of highest priority needs/projects (e.g., "top 10", "top 
20"), and focus on collaborative strategies to address them. Responsibility: SA, FA, Trb, LG, NPO, Biz, 
MTRI, MRPA 



Action B.l. 2 : Select Management Options that Emphasize Balanced Resident & Nonresident Use 

Consider the values and desires of local residents and communities when making management 
decisions about use levels of natural/historic/cultural assets. Involve residents, community leaders, 
businesses, elected officials and interest groups in discussions about desirable balance t)etween 
nonresident visitation and local quality of life. Use research about current/future conditions, trends. 



Statewide Comprehensive Outdiwr Recreation Plan (SCORP) 



Ad- Ad Agency »1n-Attractlon.Biz-Busin«w,BTA -Buiinew Trade A»»n,CC-ChambCT of Commerce,DIJ-Dept. of I jbor k Ind.,DOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commerce.DOR-Dept. of Revenue,Ext-Exlonfiion Survte 

100 C11AITFR5: Priortty Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



carrying capacity, supply and demand to inform decisions about asset use. Improve coordination 
between communities, agencies, tribes, businesses and non-profit interest groups (sportsmen, 
conservation, cultural, etc.). Develop MOU's where appropriate to create partnerships and share 
resources. Monitor tourism and recreation impacts by communicating with users, businesses, 
communities, tribes, etc., while improving mechanisms for visitor data collection. 
Responsibility: SA, FA, Trb, LG, NPO, Biz 



'Increases in the numbers of tourists 
should not overwhelm existing infra- 
structure and opportunities, growth 
should be based on the ability to handle 
the influx without negative impacts. ' 

- Online Survey Participant 



Action B.\.i : Develop Systems of Allocated Use in Sensitive Areas 

Create policies, limits and systems of allocated use where necessary to accommodate public use 
while protecting and restoring assets. Utilize interagency /interregional coordination assisted by public, 
private and non-profit user input to assist decision-making processes. Amplify signing and information 
materials to educate the public about low-impact visitation ("pack in/pack out", use of fire pans and 
portable toilets, etc.). Continue visitor use management systems, and limit numbers of visitor permits for 
guided and non-guided trips in areas where visitor numbers are degrading assets. Continue road and 
trailhead management policies, as needed, to allocate use in areas sensitized by overuse, weather or 
biological concerns. Responsibility: SA, FA, Trb, NPO, Leg, FWP Commls., Outfitters Licensing Board 

Action B.IA : Evaluate Licensing for All Guided Recreation Activities that Involve Safety Risk 

Consider state licensing and bonding of all commercial guided recreation activities that present a 
public safety risk. Evaluate the number of outfitters/guides and their guests that can use an area without 
exceeding its carrying capacity, taking into account a balanced, corresponding number of non-guided 
use. Determine outfitter/guide allocations that allow reasonable access to visitors who need a guide, as 
well as to those who do not. Responsibility: Outfitters Licensing Board, Leg, SA, FA, BTA 





Snowmobiling in Montana 



Action B.1.5 : Address Motorized vs. Non-Motorized Recreation User Conflicts 

Emphasize cooperation between land managers/ov^Tiers and user groups to help maintain or 
create opportunities/areas which separate (or disperse) motorized and non-motorized use, and consider 
user conflicts in trail planning. Develop partnerships to establish and maintain designated public or 
privately-owned areas for "motorized parks". Support agency programs to retain both motorized and 
non-motorized trails, while protecting assets and preventing overuse. Set use limits where necessary, 
and disseminate responsible trail use education materials. Responsibility: SA, FA, NPO, LO, Biz, LG 

Action B.T..6 : Address Invasive Species Problems through Partnerships & Educational Programs 



'The snowmobile tourism industry should 
be actively engaged in efforts to forge 
acceptable compromises with 
wilderness/quiet trail advocates. 
Mo torized and non-mo torized advocates 
need to work together to carve up the 
turf, so to speak....Otherwise. continued 
conflict will result in continued 
controversy and uncertainty for the 
industry. ' 

• Public Comment on Draft Plan 



FA-Federal Agency,I.eg-l.egislalure,LG-Local Gov't.l.Oljnd Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalition.NPONon-Profit Org'n,SA-SUte Agency,! AC-Tourism Advisory CouncU,TTl-Tourisin RegionsTrb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapters: Priority Objectives & Actions 101 



'It is our task in our time and in our 
generation to hand down undiminished 
to those who come after us, as was 
handed down to us by those who went 
before, the natural wealth and beauty 
which is ours. ' 

- John F. Kennedy 



Implement agency, county and municipal invasive species plans (noxious weeds, zebra mussels) 
and management strategies (e.g. Montana State Trails Plan, USPS Landscape Stewardship, USFWS 
invasive species protocol). Educate resident and nonresident travelers regarding prevention and control 
measures necessary to eradicate invasive species. Use informational brochures, press releases, public 
service announcements, agency web sites, workshops, etc. Continue partnerships between management 
agency staff, volunteers, user groups, schools, 4-H groups, conservation districts, agricultural industry 
and media to effectively address the issue. Responsibility: SA, FA, DOAg, RC&D, NPO, LO, Biz 

Action B.1.7 : Encourage Appropriate Use of Land Conservancy Programs 

Build awareness of federal programs that conserve agricultural lands and natural areas, such as 
conservation easements. Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002, and Farmland Protection 
Program. Advocate for continuation of conservancy programs. Responsibility: FA, DOAg, Ext, LO, 
NPO 



Measures of Success for Objective B.l : 

♦ Creation of statewide database of natural/historic/cultural assets and facilities 

♦ Amount of local involvement in decisions regarding asset multiple use and management 

♦ Prevention of damage to sensitive assets/recovery of degraded areas 

♦ Level of consensus between motorized and non-motorized users 

♦ Decrease of infestation of invasive species 

♦ Increase in acreage enrolled in conservancy programs 



Block Manogement Program 

From 1996 to 2001, the number of 
participating landowners increased 
from 796 to 1,075 (35%); enrolled 
acreage increased from 7.1 million 
to 8.7 million acres (22%); and 
estimated hunter days increased 
from 212,301 to 347,915 (6%). 

Source: FWP 



B.2: Objective: Address Access Issues on Public & Private Lands & Waters 

Montana is about one-third public land (35%), nearly two-thirds private land (61%), and 
five percent tribal land. Montanans historically have enjoyed access not only to public lands, 
but also to much of the state's privately-owned lands for recreational purposes - especially 
hunting and fishing. However, in recent years, economic pressures on farmers, ranchers and 
timber companies have forced closures or sale of private lands for recreational leases and 
residential development resulting in reduced access. At the same time, federal and state 
budgets and environmental issues have curtailed agencies' abilities to construct and maintain 
access roads and trails on public lands. The population of Montana, and the number of 
nonresident visitors, has increased in the past decade, creating more demand on diminishing 
accessible lands and waters. Loss of access to public and private lands, and limits on 



Ad- Ad Agency ,Attn-Allraction,BU-Busine«s,BTA -BiuineiM Trade As»n,CCOiambef of Commerce.DLI-Depl. of ijtxx k Ind.,DOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC-Dept. of Cominerce,DOR-Depl. of Revenue.Ext-Extension Service 

102 CHAPTERS: PRioRfTY Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



methods/modes of access, has created increasing conflicts among user groups in Montana. 
Several programs are currently in place, and achieving success, to address access issues: 

♦ Access Montana, a program to protect and improve public access to isolated state and 
federal lands, emphasizing a cooperative approach to the resolution of 
sportsman/landowner/agency conflicts involving public land access. 

♦ Montana's Block Management Program, established in 1985 to create cooperative 
agreements between private landowners, public agencies, and Fish, Wildlife & Parks to 
provide free public hunting opportunities on private lands and isolated public lands. FWP 
pays private landowners a nominal fee for allowing hunters access to their property to 
harvest big game, upland game birds, and waterfowl. The program is funded through 
nonresident outfitted big game licenses, nonresident upland game bird licenses, and a 
Hunter Access Enhancement Fee paid by all resident and nonresident hunters. 

A number of special task forces have been formed to address specific issues related to public 
land access (see sidebar). The intent of the task forces is to foster agency agreement on access 
issues; and better cooperation between land management agencies and private groups. 

Action B.2.V . Support Implementation of Strategies to Improve Access to Public Lands & Waters 

Support efforts of federal and state agencies to acquire easements, and to exchange or purchase 
land from willing private landowners, in order to preserve access to public lands and waters. Include 
easements for access when recreational agreements are being purchased. Implement the access strategies 
identified in the 2001 Montana State Trails Plan. Continue to publish and distribute the Montana Access 
Guide to Federal & State Lands, and the Access Montana program to protect and improve public recreation 
access to isolated state and federal lands. Responsibility: SA, FA, Trb, NPO, LO 

Action B.2.2 : Expand the Block Management Program for Access to Private Lands 

Support the efforts of Fish, Wildlife & Parks to expand Montana's Block Management Program 
for access to private lands. Consider increase in fees paid to landowners to compensate for costs of 
public use impacts, and as incentive to encourage broader participation. Responsibility: FWP, LO, TR, 
NPO 

Action B.2.3 : Use Special Groups to Facilitate Discussion of Access to Public/ Private Lands & Waters 



Land & Water Access Task Forces 

Montana Interagency Access Council (MIAC), 
formed in mid-1990's as informal ad htK group 
of state, federal and local land management 
agencies and groups (e.g. Montana Assn. of 
Counties) to discuss land/water access issues 
and work in collatjorative fashion. Council 
meets two to three times per year to identify 
common and specific problems, and possible 
solutions. MIAC prints and distributes the 
Montana Access Guide to Federal and State tjinds. 

River Recreation Advisory Council, formed in 
summer 2002 "for the purpose of assisting 
Montana FWP with the development of a 
statewide framework, policy and rules for 
managing recreation on Montana's rivers." 
Council consists of representatives from 
groups interested in river recreation 
management, and those who will be affected 
by river recreation management decisions. 

Agency Roundtable, formed in 2002 by 
Montana FWP to convene state/federal 
agencies that have river recreation 
management resfHjnsibilities. Its purpose is to 
exchange information on river recreation 
management responsibility and jurisdiction, 
strategic planning processes, and rules 
governing recreation on rivers. Agency 
Roundtable provides an opportunity to learn 
more about other agencies' efforts to address 
increasing use and social conflict on rivers, and 
to identify opportunities to coordinate 
planning efforts and collaborate on projects. 

Interagency Recreational Fee Demonstration 
Program Coordination Task Force, organized 
to facilitate interagency coordination of the 
federal Fee Demo Program. 



FA-Federal Agency,Leg-I.egislature,LG-Local CKJv'l,1.0-Land Owners,MTC=Montana Tourism CoaliUon,NPO=Non-Profil Orgn.SA-Stale Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncaTR-Tourism Regions.Trt)-Trit)es 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: Priority Objectives & Actions 103 



'Without the funding for access 
acquisition and development of public 
areas, the tourist, and Montanans, will 
not have access to the assets they 
came to see in the first place. ' 

- Public Comment on Drof t Plon 



Continue to use interagency groups and special task forces to gather and disseminate 
information, and develop collaborative strategies for access management and policies. Create additional 
partnerships between land management agencies, tribes, and private sector/non-profit interest groups to 
help resolve major access issues and suggest alternative approaches. Expand communication on access 
issues and cooperation between agencies, user groups, and other interested parties. Responsibility: MT 
Interagency Access Council, SA, FA, NPO, TR, Trb 

Measures of Success for Objective B.2 : 

♦ Number of easements, exchanges or purchases consummated to preserve access 

♦ Amount of expansion of Block Management Program acreage/participation, funding 

♦ Number and nature of public access issues resolved betw^een user groups/agencies 




aerving you with pride 



Fig. 5.1: Rest Areas & Highway Improvements 




Key 



B.3 Objecrive: Develop an Enhanced Transportation System in Montana 

Montana's residents, visitors, and key industries are heavily dependent on 
transportation: personal, public, motor carrier, air and rail services. Research conducted for the 
Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) found that tourism, and growth in Montana's 
visitor and service industries, will generate increased traffic throughout the State (motorized, 
rail, pedestrian, bicycle, pack animal, etc.), and increased demand for air travel. 

The principal transportation challenge for tourism and economic development in much 
of Montana is not lack of infrastructure, but the distance to be traveled. The 
Montana Department of Transportation and other state/federal agencies, 
transportation providers, communities, and tribes have developed strategic plans 
for multi-modal transportation systems. In many cases, though, planning and 
implementation of actions are impeded by lack of connectivity and 
communication between possible partners, an uninformed public, and funding 
deficiencies. 

Montana's highway system connects communities and the state to national 
and international transportation systems. The roadway system is the largest 
single capital investment in Montana, and the needs of Montana's highways are 
increasing as a result of the state's growing population, tourism, and pass-thru 
traffic. 

MDT's multimodel transportation plan, TranPlan 21, identifies and 



• I.xisting Rest An.j 
O nnnntd K<-st Area 

Impriivi'nwnt 



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104 CHAPTERS: Priority OB)tcrivES& Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



evaluates transportation issues facing Montana. According to the TranPlan 21 annual report for 
2001, Montana has a total of 69,556 miles of public roads; of which 55,682 are state-designated 
and 3,874 miles are federally-designated. The state highway system also contains over 4,600 
bridges, each of which MDT inspects at least every two years for damage and deterioration. 
MDT has developed and implemented a Bridge Management System that is used to prioritize 
and coordinate bridge construction/maintenance projects with highway projects. In addition, 
the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) identifies highway, rail, aeronautic, 
and transit improvements to preserve, renovate, and enhance Montana's transportation system. 
The September 2001 STIP, covering fiscal years 2002 through 2004, identified over 400 
transportation projects statewide for MDT implementation. 

Rest areas on interstate, primary and secondary roads are necessary in areas where 
private business cannot meet demand. Although the number of Montana's state rest areas is 
increasing, hours of operation and amenities need improvement, especially during the winter. 
According to ITRR research, less than half of Montana's winter visitors were satisfied with the 
availability of highway rest areas. 

Montana's aviation industry serves an important role in ensuring statewide 
connectivity, both within and without. Air transportation within the state is highly dependent 
on consumer "supply" and "demand" levels of major national airlines. Nonresident tourists 
create demand for enhanced air service to and from Montana, which enhances service for 
Montana citizens and businesses. Montana also has a strong interest in the preservation of rail 
services. The rail system is a key element of the state's overall transportation system, and 
supports existing industry, including tourism. Seasonality of tourism in Montana decreases 
profitability and service of transportation carriers (airlines, passenger rail, car rental agencies, 
shuttle services, etc.). Strategic tourism planning and marketing efforts will help to preserve 
and enhance existing transportation service levels. 

The graying of America will increase the importance of transit/shuttle transportation to 
meet the needs of both Montanans and nonresidents. Visitors will require more options for 
mechanized modes of travel within and to urban/rural areas and attractions (national parks, 
golf courses, historic sites, shopping, medical services, etc.). Scheduled bus service is available 
in some of Montana's urban areas (Billings, Great Falls, Missoula, Butte and Kalispell) but not in 
Helena, Bozeman or most rural areas. A number of communities provide door-to-door bus or 
van service (e.g., Call-A-Ride or elderly/disabled transit services). Taxi service is limited only to 
a few urban areas. 



TranPlan 21 

The Department of Transportation 
statewide multimodal transportation 
plan, TranPlan 21, has identified 
current and future issues/concerns, 
and established MDT policy goals 
and actions since 1995. Annual 
TranPlan 21 reports track 
implementation of policy goals, 
actions and system features. 
Biennial analysis monitors changes, 
assisted by public and stakeholder 
input, establishing need for 
amendments and revisions. A 
majority of goals and actions have 
been completed and those remaining 
ore. being implemented. 

Source: MDT 



MDT Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP) 

STIP identifies highnvay, rail, 
aeronautic and transit 
improvements to Montana's 
transportation systems. 
Transportation Equity Act (TEA-21) 
funding assists with accomplishment 
of STIP objectives. 



'h accomplishment j 



FA-Fedetal Agency,Leg'l.egislalure,LG-Local Gov'l,LO-Land Owners.MTC-Monlana Tourism Coalition,NI'0-Non-Profit Org'n,SA-State Agency .TAC-Tourism Advisor>' Council. TR-Tourism Regions.Trt>-Trib«i 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaitfrS: PRioRm Objectives & Actions 105 



Nofresident tourists create demand 
for enhanced air service to and from 
AAontana, which improves service for 
Montana citizens and businesses. 




fAoniana has 5,048 miles of state 
and federal highways 



Trails are a significant tourism and recreation asset in Montana, whether they are 
backcountry hiking/horse trails, OHV trails, groomed cross-country ski or snowmobile trails, or 
urban and rural bicycle/pedestrian trails. Conscientious planning and expansion of Montana 
trail systems can improve the economic vitality and quality of life for Montana's communities 
and residents. An improved urban and rural trail system provides additional soft adventure 
recreation activities to residents and visitors alike. Tour companies and recreation-related 
businesses benefit from increased bookings of bicycle/walking tours. Trails in wilderness and 
primitive backcountry areas offer access to adventure recreation opportunities (backpacking, 
big game hunting, high country fishing, horse/mule/llama pack trips, etc). 

Improved bicycle and pedestrian facilities are needed for commuting, transportation, 
recreation and the preservation of environmental quality. MDT's State Bicycle and Pedestrian 
Coordinator is responsible for addressing non-motorized transportation considerations, 
including planning and technical assistance, and coordination of available funds for bicycle and 
pedestrian improvements. MDT publishes Bicycle the Big Sky, a visitor guide of bicycle-related 
maps. Partnerships are being developed between MDT, Dept. of Commerce, tourism regions, 
and the private sector to maintain bicycle-related tourism guides and information. 

According to the State Trails Plan, maintaining the current trail system in Montana, and 
planning for expansion, is one of the biggest challenges facing trail users and land management 
agencies. Government funding for maintaining the current network of trails is insufficient. 

Action B.3.1 : Advance Implementation of Montana's Rest Area Strategy 

Use strategies contained in MDT's TranPlan 21 Update and Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP) to improve rest areas. Complete new rest area projects with design 
improvements and visitor services, including visitor information (see Action B.4.1). Address seasonality 
and extend hours of operation at key rest areas needed to serve tourists. Develop partnerships and 
funding opportunities with private/nonprofit sectors to assist with seasonal maintenance and staffing 
needs. Respon<;ibility: MDT, DOC, TR, CC, VIC, NPO 



Action B.3.2 : Continue to Improve Roads & Bridges; Address Maintenance Backlog 

Advocate for funding and implementation of Montana Department of Transportation highway 
and bridge improvement actions identified in TranPlan 21 Update and the Statewide Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP). Expand local input into decision-making on road improvements which 
will enhance or affect natural, historic, cultural and community assets. Additionally, expand 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Ann-AttracUan,Biz-Buslnew,BTA -BuibiCM Tiade Amn,CC<luunber of Commerce.DU-Depl. of Ubor & Ind.,OOAg4)epl. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commerce.DOR-Depl. of R«venue,Ext-Fjiten<ilan Service 

1 06 Chapter 5: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & RECREAnoN Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



partnerships and funding opportunities between agencies and the private/nonprofit sectors to address 
the backlog of maintenance on transportation infrastructure. Responsibility: MDT, SA, FA, MACo, 
MLCT 



Action B.3.3 : Work with Air Carriers/ Airports to Identify Needs & Enhance Air Service 

Continue Montana's statewide aviation planning process by encouraging tourism stakeholders to 
participate in air service task force groups, and to remain actively involved in meetings with airlines 
regarding frequency and scheduling of flights. Where possible, address needs of airlines to enhance 
service. Identify airport improvements and aviation strategies that will support or enhance tourism. 
Responsibility: MDT, DOC, TR, CVB, Biz 

Action B.3.4 : Advocate for Passenger Rail Service 

Build relationships and coordination efforts with Amtrak, Burlington Northern and independent 
short lines. Advocate to state/federal agencies and elected officials for support of passenger rail service. 
Work with tour operators, tourism businesses, MDT and other state/federal agencies to promote 
increased use of passenger rail service through packaging, rail/drive/bus tours, etc. Responsibility: 
DOC, TAC, TR, CVB, Biz, MDT 

Action B.3.5 : Work with Car Retital Agencies to Identify Needs & Enhance Services 

Create partnerships with automobile rental agencies to identify and address service needs, and to 
package car rental with lodging, attractions, activities and events, especially during shoulder seasons. 
Responsibility: TR, CVB, CC, Biz 

Action B.3.6 : Identify Opportunities for Transit/Shuttle Transportation at Major Destinations 

Work with cities, counties and attractions to identify and seek funding for transit/shuttle 
transportation to meet the needs of travelers, and to reduce impact from personal vehicle traffic in high 
visitation areas. Explore opportunities to utilize federal transportahon grant funds. 
Responsibility: MDT, TR, CC, NPS, Attn, Biz, MLCT, MACo 

Action B.3.7 : Enhance Montana's Trail System 

Form partnerships between local governments, agencies, tribes, private landowners, non- 
profit/for-profit user groups, tourism businesses, and others to continue planning, seek funding sources, 
and address management of Montana's trail system. Use the State Trails Advisory Committee (STAC) to 
facilitate communication and action between partners. Integrate Montana's trail system with the state's 

FA-Federal Agency ,Leg-I.egisblure,lX>Ix>cal Gov'I.LOl.and Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism CoaUtion.NPONon-Profit Org'n,SA-SUle Agency ,TAC-1 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chaiter 5: PRiORm Objectives & Actions 




Passenger and freight rail services are 
important to Montana's economy. 



'An efficient shuttle bus system that links 
Glacier NP and gateway communities would 
reduce congestion, improve transportation 
options and provide opportunities for 
positive resident/visitor interaction. ' 

- Online Survey Porticipont 




Trolleys & shuttles provide alternative 
tourist transportation. 



s 
107 



'Visitors will spend more quality time in 
gateway communities if they are 
pedestrian friendly Walkable 
downtowns, river -walk trails and bike 
paths shouU be devehped and promoted 
as part of the Montana experience. ' 

- Public Comment on Draft Plan 




primary transportation network and, where appropriate, provide alternatives to vehicular transportation, 
according to guidelines in the 2001 Montana State Trails Plan and TranPlan 21 Update. 

Improve trail maintenance, and retain or expand existing trails (where appropriate) in order to 
maintain recreation opportunities and diffuse user demand, thereby reducing impacts from concentrated 
trail use. Work to prevent trail closures, which have a negative impact on surrounding communities and 
tourism businesses. Partner with MDT and other agencies to improve bike and pedestrian facilities in 
urban and rural areas. Combine bicycle/f)edestrian related improvements with byway activities for 
increased opportunities for partnerships and federal funding. 
Responsibility: MDT, MTRI, STAC, NPO, LG, Trb, Biz, LO 

Measures of Success for Objective B.3 : 

♦ Number of completed projects/actions in MDT TranPlan 21 and STIP 

♦ Number of enhancements to commercial air service and airports 

♦ Continuation/expansion of passenger rail service 

♦ Enhancements to car rental/transit/shuttle transportation services 

♦ Augmentation/improvement of Montana's trail inventory 

♦ Increases in number of miles and condition of bike/f)edestrian and backcountry trails 





c 



Hiking near Dupuyer 



Ad-Ad Agency, Altn-Amaction.BU!>Busine«.BTA -BusineM Trade A»»n,CC-Chamber of Commerce.DU-Depl. of I jbor k Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commerce.DOR-Depl. of Revenue.Kxt-Kxfenskm Servk« 

108 CHAPTFR 5: PRKiRrTY Oh?i CTivis & Actions Montana Tourism & Rfcrfation Stratfcic Pi an 2003-2007 



B.4 Objective: Create a Comprehensive & Interactive "System" of Visitor 
Information & Interpretation 

Montana's current system of visitor information is three-fold: information for vacation 
planning , information for vacation orientation within Montana, and information for on-site 
interpretation and entertainment . 

PLANNING. The Department of Commerce Promotion Division (Travel Montana) 
provides high-quality vacation planning guides and brochures, web sites and telephone travel 
counselors (800#) that receive high ratings from travelers. Additionally, tourism regions, CVBs, 
chambers, agencies and businesses provide trip planning materials. State and regional tourism 
marketers provide information to auto club guidebooks (e.g., AAA) and to travel media for 
articles/features about Montana. Travelers' friends and relatives also are a major source of 
information for vacation planning. 

ORIENTATION. Information for traveler orientation within Montana includes highway 
signs, visitor information centers (VICs), brochure racks, billboards, front-line service persons, 
travel guides/books, maps, and travelers' friends and relatives. 

In 2000-2001, 80%+ of nonresident travelers expressed satisfaction with Montana's 
directional signage. About one-third felt that signage had improved since their last visit. 
Several of Montana's tourism regions, communities and tribes promote 
driving/loop tours; however, there is no state standard for tour route signage. 

Nearly two-thirds of 2000-2001 nonresident visitors also were satisfied 
with the availability of other travel information. About one-third felt that 
availability had improved (except in winter). The Montana Department of 
Commerce funds eight "gateway" visitor information centers (VICs) around the 
state, which generally are open from Memorial Day to Labor Day. These 
centers are located at Broadus, Culbertson, Dillon, Hardin, Shelby, St. Regis, 
West Yellowstone and Wibaux (Figure 5.2). Brochure racks are maintained by 
chambers and commercial display companies at airports, rail stations, hotels, 
restaurants, convenience store/gas stations, etc. 

ON-SITE INTERPRETATION. On-site interpretaHon and entertainment 
includes historical markers, interpretive signs, brochures (e.g., self-guided 
walking/driving tours), maps, guided tours (with human interpreter, cassette 



Fig. 5.2: State-Funded Gateway VICs 




FA-Federal Agency ,Leg-LeguUlure,U>Local Gov't,LO-I.and Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism CoalitJon.NPO-Non-Profit Org'n,.SA-SUIe Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CoundLTR-Tourism Region«vTrt>-Tribo 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapters: Priority Objectives & Actions 109 



tapes, etc.), interactive displays, reenactments, and travelers' friends and relatives. A statewide 
Lewis & Clark Interpretive Sign Strategy was developed by the Montana Tourism & Recreation 
Initiative (MTRI) inter-agency group in preparation for the Bicentennial in 2003-2007. Many of 
the interpretive sites and signs identified in the strategy have been funded, improved and 
installed. Other types of on-site interpretation and information are provided by Montana 
communities, businesses and nonprofit organizations, aided by the Montana Historical Society 
for technical assistance. Other than the Lewis & Clark sign strategy, there are no standardized 
guidelines for design or content of interpretive/informational signs that are not state-funded. 




Losi Trail Pass Rest Area 

Montana travelers have access to 59 
•est artas (13 are located in city parks). 



Action B.4.1 : Enhance State Rest Areas & VlCs with Montana Highlights 

Continue to implement MDT's Statewide Rest Area Plan provisions for visitor communication in 
rest areas by installing brochure racks, information bulletin boards, and displays of local/regional 
attractions and amenities at all state rest areas as they are constructed or upgraded. Establish policies 
and plans for display and brochure rack installation and maintenance. Contract local/regional 
organizations (chambers of commerce, tourism regions, or commercial brochure display firms) to 
voluntarily maintain displays with current information. Consider feasibility of locating VICs at 
additional rest area locations (especially inbound direction gateways) to lure visitors to area businesses 
and attractions. 

Use Montana's VICs, rest areas and chambers of commerce to showcase Montana's history and 
economy. Highlight Montana products in materials, furnishings and displays sponsored by business and 
industry groups (e.g., log furniture, copf)er accents, western art, product samples), such as products from 
Made-in-Montana and Grown-in-Montana. Pursue state legislative action if needed for policy changes. 

Expand VIC and rest area hours/seasons through development of partnerships with local 
businesses, nonprofit/service organizations and agencies. 
Responsibility: MDT, DOC, DOAg, TR, CVB, VIC, CC, Biz, Leg, FWP 



Action B.4.2 : Educate Visitors about Ethics and Responsibilities on Public & Private Lands 

Develop a concise brochure and public relations program to educate both Montanans and 
nonresident visitors about their responsibilities associated with use of public and private lands. The 
information should include a number to report violations and list penalties where appropriate. 
Distribute the brochure at VICs, rest areas, public agency offices, businesses and with fishing/hunting 
license or other public land use applications. Responsibility: MTRI, NPO, FWP 



Ad- Ad A|;«ncy.Altn-Anractkin.Biz-Busin«(i,BTA -BusiiieM Trade As«i,CC-aumibcr of Commerce.DLI-Dcpl. o( I jbor & Ind.,IX)Ag-t)ept. of Ag,lXX:-Depl. o( Commerce.DOR-Depl. of Revcnue.KxI-Kxteniiion Service 
1 10 Chaptfr 5: PR!(irity Ohii f-rtvFS h Af-rif->MS MnNTANA TnimisM &■ RifRPAnnN Stw attcic Pi an 200.1-20fT7 



Action B.4.3 : Complete Implementation of Statewide Lewis & Clark Interpretive Sign Strategy 

Continue to encourage communities to implement the sign strategy for the Bicentennial, which 
provides a unified structure, style and look for interpretive signs along the Lewis and Clark Trail, while 
encouraging creativity appropriate to each site and story. Responsibility: MLCBC, MHS, DOC, MDT, 
FWP 

Action BAA : Provide Professionally-Researched Interpretive Programs & Facilities for Visitors 

Create partnerships and combine resources to produce professional, accurate interpretive 
programs, tapes, signage, etc., for guided/self-guided tours. Responsibility: MHS, FA, Trb, Univ, FWP 

Measures of Success for Objective B.4 : 

♦ Enhancements completed at Montana rest areas and VICs 

♦ Development of public relations program on ethics and responsibilities 

♦ Completion of L&C Interpretive Sign Strategy 

♦ Number and quality of interpretive programs produced at local and state facilities 




Lewis 4 Clark Interpretive 
Center, Great Falls 



B.5 Objective: Improve Statewide System of Highway Signs 

The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) installs and maintains directional 
signage on all of Montana's federal and state highways, working in cooperation with other 
state, federal and local agencies. Federal guidelines direct the type, number and uses of signs 
on federal Interstate highways, and MDT has authority to interpret and implement federal and 
state guidelines according to state policy. Often, MDT staff are placed in the awkward position 
of deciding where signs are needed, where they are not, or which local/regional attractions or 
businesses deserve highway signs, and which do not. This is not an ideal situation for MDT 
highway staff, or for tourism and recreation providers/marketers. Representatives from MDT 
and Dept. of Commerce have discussed guidelines and policies related to highway signs. 

Action B.5. 2 : Develop/Implement Sign Guidelines for Services, Attractions & Businesses 

Complete sign guidelines handbook by the end of 2003. Include a summary of federal and state 
laws and rationale related to highway sign and billboard regulations (e.g., laws/limitations, safety, sign 
clutter, priorities, etc.). Provide guidance about the types of services and attractions most important to 
visitors, about symbol signs (see Action B.5.2), and about how to establish local/regional sign programs 



FA-Federal Agency,Leg-LegisIature,LG-I.ocal Gov'tLO-Ijuid Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalilion,NPO-Non-Profil Org'n,SA-Slate Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncilTR-Tourism Reg»on»,Trb-Trib« 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapters: PRioRm Objectives & Actions 111 



Fig. 5.3: Symbol Signs | 




E]1I 









J? 



« 



that create a "hierarchy of signs" which guide visitors to desired locations. Establish in the guidelines a 
process for deciding sign topics at the local level (most imfjortant attractions/services decided by tourism 
region recommendation to county commissioners or city council, etc.). Create statewide design 
standards for continuity in tourist corridor signs (loop tours, byways, cultural corridors, etc.). 

Assist businesses with guidelines for effective sign design in a section addressing opportunities/ 
limitations, guidelines and costs for businesses to place signs (Adopt-A-Highway, etc.) or billboards on 
state highways, or participate in visitor services signs (Tourist-Oriented Directional Signs, or TODS). 

Invite stakeholder groups to participate in the process to complete a user-friendly sign 
guidelines/policy handbook, in order to improve Montana's system of signs and reduce conflicts between 
MDT and local communities and businesses. Dishibute the handbook through tourism, government and 
business organizaHons. Responsibility: MDT, DOC, TR, MACo, MLCT, Biz, MHS, BTA, MTTA, Trb 

Action B.5.2 : Encourage Statewide Adoption of Visitor-Friendly Symbol Signs 

Encourage Montana attractions, agencies and businesses to adopt and use symbol signs which 
provide consistent directional and orientation sign icons/graphics for visitors (Figure 5.3). Work with 
MDT to ensure consistency of sign symbols, and compliance with federal and state guidelines and policy. 
Responsibility: MDT, DOC, TR, Biz 



Action B.5.3 : Address Appropriate Use/Placement of Billboards Wlule Maintaining Landscapes 

Work with billboard companies to mitigate negative impacts of billboards, while still providing 
advertising opportunities for businesses and useful information for travelers (up to 20% of Montana's 
nonresident visitors indicated that highway billboards were useful). Address controversial issues related 
to billboards (size, placement, design, sign clutter, viewscapes), and educate businesses about 
federal/state/local laws regulating billboards. Enhance traveler safety and landscape aesthetics by 
educating businesses about effective use of colors, graphics, text font and amount of text. Additionally, 
consider alternatives to billboards where possible/practical, and encourage businesses to use alternative 
methods of advertising. Responsibility: TR, MDT, Biz, MACo, MLCT 

Measures of Success for Objective B.5 : 

♦ Distribution of sign guidelines/policy handbook by 2004 

♦ Policy adoption of symbol signs, and widespread use of them 

♦ Increased participation in TODS 

♦ Consistent use of directional and orientation signing 

♦ Reduction of controversies surrounding billboards 



Ad-Ad Agency .AMn-AttTactlon,mz-Bu»liWM,BTA -Bii»lne«5 Trade AsMvCC-Chambcr of Commctce.OI.I-tX-pl of l.abor & Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,IX)C-Depl. of Commcrce.DOR-IX-pt. of Revcnue.Kxt-Fxteiwkx) Servkie 

1 1 2 Chapter 5: PRioRrrv Obji ctivks & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



B.6 Objective: Assist Communities to Enhance Facilities/Services for Tourism 
Development while Respecting Community Values, Heritage & Character 

Many Montana communities and rural areas are coping with rapid growth, including an 
ever-growing number of tourists, while others are de-populating. Montanans who participated 
in the strategic planning process expressed feelings of strong attachment to their state's 
landscape and cultural heritage, and to the character of their towns. They want a healthy 
economy, but not at the expense of their natural surroundings, culture, or community. 

While some communities desire more tourism overall, other communities or areas may 
decide to "de-market" certain seasons or visitor segments to reduce local impacts. De- 
marketing can target growth/visitation in general, or a certain sector/group in particular (e.g., 
fishermen), on either a temporary or permanent basis. 

The Montana Community Tourism Assessment Program (CTAP) helps analyze local 
resident attitudes about (and interest in) tourism, measure tourism potential, identify gaps in 
visitor services and suggest projects or actions that can strengthen the role of tourism in the 
local economy. CTAP is funded by the state lodging tax and administered by the Department 
of Commerce. At the end of the 8-month process, communities can use grant funds to develop 
priority projects. From 1991 to 2001, CTAP assisted 27 Montana communities. 

The Tourism Infrastructure Improvement Program (TIIP) is funded by the state lodging 
tax and administered by the Department of Commerce. Since 1995, TIIP grants have provided 
more than $1.5 million in funds for 31 projects in 26 communities across the state. 

The Special Events Grant Program (SEGP), administrated by the Department of 
Commerce Promotion Division, assists economic development and tourism through grant 
funding for the creation of an event or to make an event more successful. The types of projects 
eligible include attendance events, enrichment activities and promotional events. 

The National Main Street program provides assistance to downtown districts or 
subdistricts seeking economic revitalization and infrastructure improvements. More than 1,600 
communities belong to the National Main Street program (www.mainstreet.org), including 
several in Montana, using its Four-Point Approach^^*^ to address business retention and 
recruitment, downtown design, marketing and organizational development. 



Attracting tourists and visitors - 
especially heritage/cultural 
travelers - is an important 
economic development strategy 
for many downtowns. 

National Moin Street News, June 2002 



'Infrastructure needs to include perk 
facilities and Staff ing, land base for 
park development and historic and 
recreational asset maintenance. ' 

- Public Comment on Draft Plon 

'Many local park systems serve 
as tourism sites for stopovers between 
major sites. In some cases heal parks 
and amenities may be a destination. 
Certainly events sponsored at major city 
parks have as many non-residents as 
residents participating or visiting. ' 

- Public Comment on Droft Plan 



FA-Federal Agency.I.eg'l«gislature,lX>Local Gov't,L01.and Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalition.NPO-Non-Profit Org'n,SA-Stale Agency ,TAC«Tourism Advisory CounciLTR-Tourism Rcgions.Trb-Trilws 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: PRioRm Objectives & Actions 113 



'Building the tourism infrastructiMre 
is extremely important to the tribes. 
The tribes have a lot to offer: 
however, they lack the funding, 
training and facilities to participate 
in tourism efforts. ' 

- Online Survey Comnvent 



Aci'ion B.6.1 : Continue and Enhance Community Tourism Assessment (CTAP) & Tourism 
Infrastructure Improvement (TUP) Programs 

Assist at least three communities each year to assess their tourism and recreation potential 
through the Community Tourism Assessment Program. Provide tourism infrastructure improvement 
funds through the Tourism Infrastructure Improvement Program. Responsibility: DOC, LG, Ext, ITRR 

Action B.6.2 : Encourage Reinew of City/County/Tribal Infrastructure & Public Services 

Conduct workshops and discussions to develop an inventory of local tourism-related 
infrastructure, facilities and public services which provide safe and quality visitor experiences. Focus on 
recreation (sports venues, event centers, fairgrounds), arts, cultural, historic and interpretive 
facilities/services, VICs, EMS/medical/fire, law enforcement, utilities (water/sewer, waste, f)ower, 
telecom), transportation (capacity, parking, traffic control, transit options), information/interpretation, 
and facility reconstruction to meet accessibility and safety standards. Form alliances of communities, 
tribes, agencies, private citizens, businesses, private/nonprofit groups to utilize cooperative funding 
strategies and strategic planning partnerships. Identify top priority needs and seek funding to address 
them (see Appendix C). Contribute appropriate inventory items to statewide tourism asset database 
(AcHon A.7.5). Responsibility: LG, Trb, MLCT, MACO, TR, NPO, Biz 



Action B.6.3 : Enhance Heritage/Cultural Facilities & Attractions to Meet Visitor Needs 

Work with heritage and cultural facilities to provide information about visitor trends, the tastes 
and preferences of targeted market segments, and ways that managers can refine the niche and quality of 
their facilities, services and events to better serve both residents and nonresidents. Include information 
about ways to cost-effectively develop creative, interactive and age-appropriate displays and activities, 
and to generate revenue from tourists. Utilize research on traveler habits to support decision making. 

Develop greater visibility of, and connections between, heritage and cultural assets (museums, 
galleries, historic/cultural sites, theater, music, events, reenactments), so that visitors can more easily 
access them through tourist packages, cultural tours, etc. 

Expand hours and seasons (weekends, year-round) at historical and cultural attractions. Form 
partnerships to assist with expenses and recruit additional workers as needed (i.e. high school student 
interns, Boy/Girl Scouts, FFA, 4-H, retirees). Work with hotels and meeting planners to host meeting and 
conference events at cultural venues. Responsibility: MHS, MAC, Trb, NPO, Biz, FWP 



Ad-Ad AgefKy,Aftn-Altractk)ivBiz-Busin«»,BTA -BusinCTs Trade Assn.CC-Oumbcr of Commerce.DLI-DepI of l.abor & Ind.,DOAg-Dept. of Ag,IXX:-Depl. of Commerce.lXIR-rJepl. of Revenue.Exl-F.xhrolon Service 

114 Chait^rS: Priority OB|ECTfVES& Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi-an 2003-2007 



Action B.6.4 : Encourage Community Participation in the National Main Street Program 

Assist communities in learning about the National Main Street (NMS) program, and applying its 
principles to Downtown Revitalization efforts. Obtain NMS materials and resources for community 
leaders to address economic restructuring (market analysis, business retention and recruitment), building 
fai;ade renovation, streetscape enhancements, marketing and promotion and organizational issues. 
Evaluate the feasibility of creating a Montana Main Street Program under the Department of Commerce 
or Montana League of Cities & Towns. Responsibility: DOC, MLCT, MEDA, MHS 

Action B.6.5 : Encourage Communities to Use Strategic Planning & Development Tools 

Provide information to communities about planning and development tools that will enhance 
local quality of life, as well as preserve community heritage and character. Encourage communities to 
adopt the Uniform Code for Building Conservation (UCBC) to assist owners of historic buildings in 
redeveloping them without having to meet all requirements of the Uniform Building Code for new 
construction. Educate community leaders about uses of the Uniform Code for the Abatement of 
Dangerous Buildings (UCADB), which allows cities to address hazardous structures. Sponsor 
workshops on SmartGrowth principles, historic districts, affordable housing and other tools that will aid 
in preserving local quality of life while dealing with growth and development issues. 
Responsibility: MLCT, MACo, DOC, MEDA 



"Somewhere in this document as a 
goal, it should be talked about 
working with zoning and planning to 
keep the "individual character" of 
an area, and also to keep open 
space and agriculture - which are 
the attractants for tourists. " 

- Public Comment on Draft Plan 



Measures of Success for Objective B.6 : 

♦ Number of communities who participate in CTAP and TUP programs 

♦ Number/attendance of workshops conducted for city /county /tribal entities regarding 
facility/service needs to support tourism 

♦ Community improvements as a result of facility/infrastructure projects 

♦ Enhancements to heritage/cultural facilities and events to better meet visitor needs 

♦ Expanded hours and services at heritage/cultural facilities and sites 

♦ Number of communities participating in Main Street programs, and success of Downtown 
revitalization efforts 

♦ Number of communities/counties using planning and development tools to address issues 
of grov^th, historic building redevelopment, hazardous buildings, etc. 



FA-Federal Agency,l.eg-I,egisla(ure,I,G-Local Gov't,LO-Land Owners,MTC=Miintana Tourism Coalition,NIX>Non-Profil Org'n,SA-Slale Agency,! AC-Tourism Advisory CounciLTR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Tribrt 

Montana Tourism &RtcREATiON Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: Priortty Objectives & Actions 115 



C. Creating Teams 



c. 


Creating Teams 


CI 


Link Agrtculture with Tourism 


C,2 


Create Partnerships to Address 




Asset Monogement Needs 


C3 


Increase Utilization of Business 




Assistance Programs 


C4 


Identify Business Opportunities to 




Serve Visitors on Public Lands 


C5 


Enhance 'Edu- Structure' to 




Support Tourism 


C6 


Build Funding Portnerships 


CI 


Develop Additional Funding Sources 


C8 


Focilitate Implementation of 




Strategic Plon 



Montana visitors ate 110,000,000 

meals in 2001, or 2.1 million/week. 

But how much was Montana Beef? 

Nonresident tourists spent more 
than $332 million on restaurant meals 
and beverages, and another $125+ 
million on groceries and snacks - not 
including meals consunted in the homes 
of friends and relatives. 

A better mechanism is needed to 
link tourists - and the businesses that 
serve them - with Montana agricultural 
and ranching products. 



!Vi!i"j;' ".';',v^i.B.JJv;'';M<ii!i. >^r-l?,-'f?*!'l.'^- '.' 



In a world of limited funding and technical resources, partnerships are essential to 
accomplish tasks. This section outlines a series of objectives and actions designed to create 
partnerships that will leverage existing dollars to address the actions listed in the previous two 
sections. It also includes actions to facilitate enhanced collaboration between stakeholders, 
provide business assistance, and implement the Strategic Plan during the years 2003-2007. 

C.l Objective: Identify Opportunities to Link Agriculture with Tourism 

Tourists eat: in 2001, nonresident visitors in Montana ate approximately 110,000,000 
meals - the equivalent of more than 2.1 million meals per week, or 300,000+ f>er day! They 
spent more than $332 million on restaurant meals and beverages, and another $125+ million on 
groceries and snacks, excluding meals consumed in the homes of friends and relatives. There 
are tremendous opportunities to better link Montana's agricultural products with its 
nonresident visitors, through restaurants and retailers. Currently, no formal statewide system 
exists to market Montana products to restaurants via brokers and suppliers. Thus, many 
opportunities to develop value-added products (and jobs) are missed, because raw materials 
(cattle, bushels of wheat, etc.) are shipped out of state for processing, packaging and sales. 
Funding for development of value-added ag products is available from USDA through the 2002 
Farm Bill (see Appendix C). State programs like the Department of Agriculture's Farmers 
Market listing and Grown In Montana (GIM) exist to market products for retail sales, but they 
do not address opportunities to create broker/wholesaler mechanisms to supply restaurants. 
Additionally, there are opportunities to better educate tourists about Montana's agriculture and 
ranching industries through tours, interpretation and information dissemination. 

Action C.1.1 : Create Mechanisms for Tourism Businesses to Use Montana Agricultural Products 

Identify opportunities to create brokered/wholesale purchase and distribution of ag products, 
based on analyses of current restaurant suppliers and buying trends. Work with groups of producers to 
develop products specifically for Montana restaurants, and create branded items ("Montana Beef") to 
add value to the products in the eyes of visitors. Responsibility: DOAg, BTA, TR, CC, Biz 



Ad-Ad Af;ency,Attn-AltractiaaBiz-Busine«s,8TA -Buslneu Trade AMn,CC-Channber of Commerce.DI.I-Dept of I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,r)OC-Depl. of Comnwrre.DOR-Depl. of Revpnue.Exf-Extmsion Service 

116 ChaiterS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strateqc Plan 2003-2007 



Action C.2.2 ; Enhance Existing Programs with Focus on Tourist Markets 

Link promotion of Farmers' Markets, Made-In-Montana/Grown In Montana programs to tourism 
promotion. Provide information in state and regional travel guides and web sites, and at VICs. 
Encourage producers to become active in local and regional tourism organizations, and network with 
tourism businesses to buy and/or promote their products. Responsibility: DOAg, DOC, NPO, Biz, TR 

Action C.1.3 : Develop Cooperative Marketing Campaigns between Agriculture & Tourism 

Form marketing/advertising partnerships between agriculture and tourism in strategic target 
markets (similar to Napa Valley Winegrowers', or Florida Citrus Growers' partnerships with state and 
regional tourism promotion). Identify mutually-beneficial images/themes (western heritage/Montana 
beef. Big Sky Country/mountains/Montana water or malted barley). Work with agricultural marketing 
groups to create campaigns and leverage advertising dollars. Responsibility: DOC, DOAg, Ad, BTA, Biz 




Action C.1.4 : Educate Visitors about Montana Agriculture & Ranching 

Expand ways to educate visitors about Montana agricultural and ranching products. Distribute 
brochures at VICs and hotels, promote farm/ranch tours or stays, place signs in fields identifying crops, 
tree species or breeds of animals, and conduct trade/technical tours for business groups, such as meetings 
and conventions, university researchers, etc. Work with farmers/ranchers to provide unique venues for 
meeting/convention events (receptions, bam dances, etc.). Responsibility: DOAg, TR, CVB, NPO, Biz 

Measures of Success for Objective C.l : 

♦ New mechanisms created to link ag products with restaurants and retailers 

♦ Existing promotions expanded to target visitors 

♦ Number and reach of cooperative advertising campaigns between ag and tourism 

♦ Educational programs/tours created for visitors 




Form land near Bndger, MT 



C.2 Objective: Create Partnerships to Address Asset Management Needs 

Maintenance and operating costs to manage natural, historic and cultural assets 
continue to rise. Varying (and often conflicting) opinions exist about how - and to what extent - 
assets should be managed. Public-private-nonprofit-tribal partnerships will become 
increasingly important to addressing issues related to funding and management. To build 
partnerships and teams requires public input, stakeholder involvement, consensus-building 



FA-Federal Agency.l^g-Legislahire.LG-Local Gov'I.LO-Land Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism Coalllicm,NPO«Non-Profit Org'n,SA-Slale Agency ,TAC-Tourlsm Advison' Counciira-Tourism Rcgions.Trt>-Tribe» 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chai'thrS: Priority Objectives & Actions 117 



'Tourism is the only growing industry 
in the state - we should not forget how 
this phenomenon has occurred as we 
proceed in the next five years. The 
success IS due to the unique public/ 
private partnership we have in place. ' 
- Online Survey Participant 



and conflict resolution. Efforts by stakeholders to identify common goals, seek solutions and 
take action can result in tremendous success. 

Action C.2.1 : Identify Opportunities for Partnerships & Funding to Address Asset Needs 

Create and prioritize a list of needs that might be addressed by partnership projects and 
additional funding. Identify potential partners, roles, resources and tasks. Design partnership 
agreements to accomplish common goals and address needs. Expand membership of MTRl working 
group to include Dept. of Agriculture, DOR and BIA. Seek funding sources and advocate for additional 
funding to address asset needs. Responsibility: MTRI, SA, FA, NPO, TR, Biz, Trb 

Action C.2.2 : Evaluate Agency Regulations & Policies to Determine Differences in Prior itiesi Programs 

Identify conflicting regulations or policies that create obstacles to partnerships. Work to resolve 
policy and program differences to better facilitate inter-agency partnerships. Responsibility: MTRI 



'The tourism industry, public- land 
managers, gateway communities and 
conservationists should develop 
partnerships which have the primary 
purpose of improving stewardship of 
the natural assets that is our 
greatest attraction, the emphasis 
for the partnership is stewardship 
ra ther than promo tion. Visitors will 
be more impressed with partnerships 
aimed at stewardship of the 
resource than partnership aimed at 
getting their money. ' 

- Public Comment on Draft Plan 



Action C.2.3 : Encourage Citizens to Volunteer for Asset Maintenance Projects 

Expand programs that encourage citizen volunteers to assist with asset maintenance projects, 
such as trail reconstruction, clean-up, building picnic shelters, etc. Extend successful prototypes like 
"Adopt-A-Trail" to other facility needs ("Adopt-A-Campground, or Park, or Boat Ramp", "Adopt-A- 
Museum"). Use integrated teams of various user groups for establishing a sense of commonality among 
recreationists with different interests, as recommended by the State Trails Plan. Recruit volunteers from 
existing community organizations (Girl/Boy Scouts, families, church and community groups), or form 
specific "Friends of..." groups for particular sites/facilities. Responsibility: SA, FA, NPO, Trb 

Measures of Success for Objective C.2 : 

♦ Number of opportunities identified and partnerships formed 

♦ Number of regulatory or policy issues resolved (obstacles overcome) 

♦ Number of volunteer projects undertaken, or sites adopted 

♦ Number of volunteers (or volunteer hours) and value of time committed 



Ad-Ad Agency ,AtlifAltracHon.Bl]fBuslrwM.BTA -Businew Trade AMn,CC-OiaiTiber of Commerce.DIJ-Depl. of Labor & Ind..DOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC-I>pt. of Cotnmerce.DOR-Oept. of Reveniw.Exl-ExInwian 

1 1 8 Chapter 5: Priortty Ohikctives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



C.3 Objective: Increase Awareness & Utilization of Business Assistance Programs 
among Tourism & Recreation Businesses 

Many assistance programs exist to aid business owners and managers, from seminars 
and workshops to low-interest loan pools and workforce training funds. However, many 
tourism businesses are not aware of these programs, and often, the programs tend to target 
businesses in other sectors, such as manufacturing or high-tech. It is important to inform 
tourism and recreation businesses about the availability of these programs, and to encourage 
program managers to become familiar with tourism trends and issues. The "front line" of 
business assistance is the network of ten Small Business Development Centers (SBDC's) and 
twelve Microbusiness Development Corporations (MBDC's) across the state (see sidebar). 
MBDC's are certified to administer revolving loan funds, lending directly to businesses. The 
Department of Commerce also offers business, micro-business, finance and technical assistance. 
The Microbusiness Technical Assistance Program (MTAP) hosts monthly one-hour business 
roundtable discussions via audio-conference. Local economic development organizations and 
chambers of commerce also offer business assistance, as do local chapters of the Service Corps 
of Retired Executives (SCORE). Ensuring that tourism and recreation businesses are aware of 
the resources available to them will strengthen the tourism industry. 

Action C.3.1 : Provide Information about Business Assistance to Tourism & Recreation Businesses 

Inform businesses about assistance programs through Department of Commerce newsletters, a 
statewide tourism listserv, regional tourism meetings, press releases and business trade associations. 
Responsibility: DOC, TR, BTA, MTTA 

Action C.3.2 : Offer Entrepreneurship & Management Training for Tourism & Recreation Businesses 

Provide training for business owners and managers, such as the NxLevel course, marketing 
workshops and classes in financial management and labor issues, which are tailored to tourism and 
recreation industry issues and needs. Responsibility: DOC, SBDC, TR, Biz 

Action C.3. 3 : Address Workforce Issues & Training Programs 

Inform businesses about workforce training funds and incentives that are available for new or 
expanding businesses, or for retraining of dislocated workers. Identify ways to address challenges of 
workforce availability in shoulder seasons (college students returning to school before Labor Day), 
particularly in resort areas, as tourism promotion increases off-peak visitation. Responsibility: DLI, TR 



T fee/ that it would Improve services 
offered If there were more programs for 
the recreation Industry. " 

- Online Survey Participont 



Montana Small Business Development 
Center (SBDC) locations: 

♦ Billings 

♦ Bozeman 

♦ Butte 

♦ Colstrip 

♦ Great Falls 

♦ Havre 

♦ Helena 

♦ Kalispell 

♦ Missoula 

♦ Wolf Point 

Montana Microbusiness Development 

Corporation (MBDC) locations (all of 

the above, plus the following): 

♦ Lewistown 

♦ Glendive 

Source: Dept. of Commerce 



'We need more Information about 
Generation X so we can plan and manage our 
emerging workforce successfully. Oo not 
believe In more handouts from the 
government to offset reality costs of being 
In business. Need to provide opportunities 
for additional learning and training but not 
at taxpayer expense. ' 

• Online Survey Porticrpant 



FA'Federa) Agency, l^=Legisbture,LG-Local Gov'l,LO=Land Owners,MTC=Montana Tourism Coalilion,NI'0-Non-Profil Org'n,SA=State Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory Council.TR-Tourism Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: PRioRrrv Objectives & Actions 119 



Tourism is on industry thot exists 
around the premise of service. It is 
on industry created to satisfy 
people. 

- Travel & Tourism Research Assn. 

(TTRA). Customer Relationship 

Management m Tourism 



'Tmenty businesses with five 
employees are just as important as 
that one business with 100 employees. 
Foster small business development for 
those that truly live and love Montana ' 
- Online Survey Porticipant 



'Whenever possible we need to engage 
the private sector instead of just 
adding more bureaucracy. ' 

- Online Survey Porticipant 



Partnerships beti»een the Forest Service 
and non-governmental organizations ore a 
valuable program component and ore also 
a focus of criticism from those who fear 
over-commercialization or undue 
influences on agency decisions. 

- USPS Executive Summary, Issues A 
Concerns Reloted to Fee Demo Program 



AcWon CIA : Encourage Financial Lending to Provide Capital for Tourism & Recreation Businesses 

Make information available to businesses and potential businesses about lending programs 
available through state and local entities (MicroBusiness Finance Program, USDA Rural Development, 
SBA, lowr-interest loan pools, revolving loan funds, etc.). Encourage commercial lenders to use 
Community Reinvestment Act obligations to contribute to loan pools, or to support tourism and 
recreation business development. Responsibility: DOC, SBDC, MEDA 

Measures of Success for Objective C.3 : 

♦ Number of tourism/recreation businesses who utilize assistance programs 

♦ Number of training courses offered, and participation levels 

♦ Workforce training funds used by tourism/recreation businesses 

♦ Solutions identified for labor challenges during off-peak seasons 

♦ Amount of lending to tourism/recreation businesses, and default rates over time 



C.4 Objective: Identify Business Opportunities to Serve Visitors on Public Lands 

National tourism and recreation trends indicate that visitors have increasing 
expectations of services, interpretation and transportation on public lands. The need for 
enhanced services, and for low-impact recreational activities, present opportunities for 
businesses to partner with land management agencies and provide services that agencies are 
not well-suited to offer. Examples include guided recreational activities (trail rides, hiking, 
biking, 4-wheel tours, rafting), group tours and transportation (snow coaches, interpretive bus 
or boat tours), and specialized theme trips (culture, geology, photography, history, painting). 
Additionally, services and amenities can be provided by businesses that are difficult to offer by 
agencies, such as equipment rental, firewood, food and beverage, or retail concessions, etc. 

Action CA.l : Identify Opportunities for New or Enhanced Tourism/Recreation Services 

Evaluate opportunities for value-added services on public lands to enhance visitor experiences, 
and provide controlled, low-impact recreation (e.g., guided adventures, interpretive/eco-tours, etc.). Seek 
businesses to offer high-quality retail services to visitors, such as equipment rental, food and beverage, 
firewood, campground concessions, etc. Solicit proposals from businesses to provide services to visitors. 
Responsibility: SA, FA, Biz 
Action CA.l : Discuss Ways to Simplify Regulations & Permitting Processes Wliile Protecting Assets 



Ad-Ad Agency .AHn-AllTactian.Biz-Biuin(M,BTA •BustiWM Trade AMn,CC-auBnbCT of CommCTce,IJI.I-r)epl. of labor & Ind.DOAg-tiept of Ag,DOC-Dept. of CocnmCTce,IX)R-I)epl of Revenuc.Kxt-Kxtinwion Service 

120 CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



Reduce obstacles to value-added services provided by businesses by coordinating and 
simplifying regulations and permitting processes between agencies, while still retaining requirements 
that protect natural/historic/cultural assets. Obtain input from businesses and other stakeholder groups 
about changes. Responsibility: SA, FA, NPO, BTA, Biz 

Action C.4.3 : Investigate Contracting of Maintenance Operations to Private Businesses 

Evaluate feasibility and cost-effectiveness of contracting for public facility maintenance to private 
businesses. Responsibility: SA, FA 

Measures of Success for Objective C.4 : 

♦ Number of new tourism/recreation services offered to visitors 

♦ Simplification of regulations/permitting processes to facilitate services 

♦ Maintenance contract opportunities offered to businesses 



'Commercial endeavors on public lands 
must not be to the detriment of 
resource values or compromise the 
public's ability to enjoy their lands. ' 

- Online Survey Participant 



C.5 Objective: Enhance Montana's "Edu-Structure" to Support Tourism 

Education and training are critical components in the success of any industry or 
organization. Tourism and recreation are no exception. Professional development, workforce 
training, career tracking, leadership development, awareness of challenges/trends and ongoing 
institutional support all are important to creating a "system" of professionalism and economic 
success. Success in tourism and recreation is based on customer service - one of the most 
difficult aspects of any business or agency. Good service is dependent on understanding the 
changing needs and expectations of customers - and being able to respond to those needs 
appropriately and cost-effectively. ITRR nonresident visitor research in 2001 indicated that 
tourists were extremely satisfied with the hospitality and service they received in Montana. 
This is due in part to the Superhost! hospitality training and other educational programs that 
have helped to build service skills in the tourism and recreation industry. 




Montana State University, Bozeman 



Action C.5. 1 ; Expand Education Programs for Tourism & Recreation Careers Expand degree 
programs at all levels (associates, bachelors, masters) related to tourism and recreation, such as 
hotel/restaurant management, public facility/resource/recreation management, small 
business/entrepreneurship, tourism marketing, financial management for tourism and recreation, 
executive culinary programs, etc. Support the programs through student recruitment, intemships, work 
studies and employment opportunities. Offer specialized workforce training through community 



FA-Federal Agency .Leg-Legislature.LG-Local Gov't,l.O-Land Owners.MTC-Monlana Tourism CoaliUon,NPO-Non-Profil Org'aSA-SUle Agency ,TAC-Tourism Advisory Council.TR-Tourisin Regions.Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic I^-an 2003-2007 Chapter 5: Priortty Objectives & Actions 121 




Montana 
Superhost 



colleges and distance learning. Expand secondary education programs (such as Teens in Tourism) to 
grow a pool of interested and informed potential employees in high schools. Enhance the Superhost! 
program to include advanced level training in communication skills, conflict resolution, team-building 
and supervisory skills. Responsibility: Univ, Ext, TAC, Biz 

Action C.5.2 : Develop a Staff Training Program for VICs 

Create a VIC staff training program to include information about the VICs' role in Montana's 
tourism system, information services/displays, merchandising, reservations/booking services, volunteer 
recruitment/motivation/retention, volunteer management/reward/incentive systems, volunteer 
"employment" contracts and performance reviews, tracking inquiries/visitors, data management, facility 
management and maintenance, partnership development with private and nonprofit sectors, fam tours, 
tracking of visitor referrals from VICs, etc. Include options for testing and certification/rewards, based on 
increasingly higher levels of volunteer development. Responsibility: DOC, VIC, TR, CVB, CC 



Re. Tourism Extension Agents: 

'There should be one in at least each 
'Country'. Chamber of Commerce people 
burn out, tourism "boards" burn out - 
there should be a constant factor. In 
your entire draft, this umuld have my 
vote as the number one thing to 
accomplish. And then don 't locate the 
agent in the larger communities!" 



Action C.5.3 : Provide Regional Familiarization Tours for StatelRegionallTriballLocal Tourism Staff 

Plan and conduct regional "fam" tours for employees of VICs, tourism regions, Department of 
Commerce, call center, attractions, hotel "front-liners" and others who have marketing or customer 
contact responsibilities. Familiarize staff with their own regions, as well as other regions of the state 
(feature one or two regions each year in late spring, prior to peak season), as part of annual state VIC 
workshop. Responsibility: TR, DOC, VIC, Attn, Biz 

Action C.5.4 : Include Educational Presentations at Tourism & Recreation Meetings & Eivnts 

Plan for educational presentations at TAC, tourism region, CVB and MTRI meetings. Include 
topics such as tourism trends - needs and preferences of targeted visitors (Canadians, matures, 
international, heritage/cultural, business travelers, etc.), tourism research methods and uses, marketing, 
partnerships and public policy. Responsibility: TAC, TR, CVB, MTRI 



Comment on Droft Tourism Plan Action C.5.5 : Work loith MSU to Create "Tourism Extension Agents" in Each Tourism Region 

Create tourism specialists through the university extension system, placing one specialist in each 
tourism region. Focus efforts on rural communities and linkages between agriculture and tourism. 
Initially, fund the program through rural development grants. Responsibility: MSU, DOC, DOAg, TR 



Ad-Ad Agency .Attn-Attractlon.Bii:-BusinM».BTA -Buslneis Trade A9sn,CC-Chamber of Commerce.DI.I-Dept of I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-t3epl. of Ag,DOC-Dcpt. of Commerce.DOR-Depl. of Revenue.rKt-FKlen.<ian Sefvfce 

122 CHAPTERS: Priority Obiectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pi,an 2003-2007 



Measures of Success for Objective C.5 : 

♦ Extent of university/college degree programs offered for tourism & recreation 

♦ Adult education and distance learning programs offered 

♦ Secondary education programs/curricula related to tourism & recreation 

♦ Enhancements to Superhost! 

♦ Development of staff training for VICs 

♦ Number of fam tours offered for marketing/front-liner staff, participation levels 

♦ Number and quality of educational programs offered at tourism/recreation meetings 

♦ Creation of Tourism Extension Agents in each tourism region 

C.6 Objective: Build Funding Partnerships to Leverage Existing Dollars 

The Montana lodging tax supports visitor facilities and projects of Montana Fish, 
Wildlife & Parks, the Montana Historical Society, and the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial 
Commission. Other state and federal funds also support recreation-related facilities, as well as 
infrastructure (roads, airports, parks, national forests, etc.). As resident and nonresident use of 
recreation facilities and services has increased, funding for those assets has remained stagnant 
or declined, so revenues are not keeping up with costs for maintenance and operation. 
Partnerships are a key to funding for public recreation facilities and services. 

Action C.6.1 : Encourage Strategic Partnerships for Cooperative Project Funding """ ~ ~ 

Leverage existing dollars for facility and service projects by forming strategic partnerships 

between organizations that can access funds from multiple sources (state, federal, foundations, corporate, '...the success of much of this 

etc.). Examples are the Traveler's Rest State Park, Pompeys Pillar and Western Montana Cultural strategic plan will only be obtainable 

Corridors projects, which included state, federal, local, private, nonprofit and tribal partners. t^ith very strong partnerships. ' 
Responsibility: SA, FA, TR, CVB, CC, Biz, NPO . p^„.^ ^^^^^ „„ ^^^,^ p^„ 

Action C.6.2 : Identify Opportunities to Pool Public & Private Marketing Dollars 

Coordinate local/regional businesses and attractions to pool a percentage of their existing 
marketing budgets to leverage lodging tax funds for higher impact promotions. Explore opportunities to 
partner between state and regional partners for targeted promotions, generate advertising revenue from 
state/regional web sites, etc. Responsibility: TR, CVB, Biz, DOC, Atm, Ad 



FA-Federal Agency,I*g-I (!gislature,l.G-l.ocal Gov't,LO-I.and Owners.MTC-Montana Tourism CoaIition,NPO-Non-Profit Org'aSA-Stale Agency,! AC-Tourism Advisory CouiKaTR-Tourism R«gkin».Trt>-Tfibe» 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapter 5: Priority Objectives & Actions 123 




'Nted to implement a sales tax so 
tourists pay their own may. Lift that 
burden off the Montana taxpayer. ' 

• Online survey respondent 



I 



Federal Fee Demo Program 

The Land A Woter Conservation Fund 
Act (1965, 1972), outhorized federal 
agencies to collect entrance, admission, and 
other fees. Beset by financial difficulties 
from rising levels of visitation and operating 
costs, and unfunded infrastructure repair. 
Congress passed the Recreational Fee 
Demonstration Program (HR 2107) in March 
1996. Public Law 106-291 extended the 
program through Sept. 2004; with revenues 
availoble until Sept 2007. 

The intent of the program is to 
test... fees that are reinvested in recreation 
areas on federal lands and used to maintain 
and improve natural resources, facilities and 
services. 

The Fee Demo Program allows the Dept. 
of the Interior (NPS. BLM. USFWS) and 
Dept. of Agricultural (USFS) to implement 
and test fees across the geographic and 
programmotic spectrum of sites that they 
manage. The participating agencies can 
retoin all Fee Demo revenues, and at least 
80% of the revenues at the collection sites 
to provide on-the-ground improvements at 
local recreation sites. 

Source: DOI, USDA, 6rant-Kohrs Study- J, 
Conner 



'Local park districts are able to form under 
MCA 7-16-2401-2443. Hom/ever. a more 
specific tax district for local tourism would 
be equally if not more important. ' 

- Online Survey Participant 



Measures of Success for Objective C.6 : 

♦ Number of new partnerships formed 

♦ Number of projects and dollars leveraged for cooperative projects 

♦ Amount of pooled funding used for enhanced promotions 

♦ Number of private and nonprofit partners involved in cooperative promotions 



C.7 Objective: Develop Additional Funding Sources for Tourism & Recreation 

Lodging tax funds cannot be used to address all projects and needs related to tourism 
and recreation. The primary purpose of the lodging tax is for tourism promotion - to attract 
high-value, low impact visitors to and around Montana - in a very competitive national and 
international environment. But money also is needed for facilities and services that support 
tourism and recreation for both Montanans and visitors, such as parks, historical/cultural sites 
and facilities, search and rescue/EMS, etc. Declining state and federal budgets present 
challenges for facility and asset managers. Additional sources of funding are needed to address 
facility and service needs, so that promotion dollars are not hemorrhaged to the point of 
ineffectiveness. 

Communities like Whitefish and West Yellowstone have very successful local option 
taxes to support services for both residents and visitors. Other states use recreation districts, 
auditorium districts and other special designations to support local recreation facilities and 
services. User fees like the federal fee demo program (see sidebar) have been effective in 
providing site-specific funds for maintenance and operation of recreation facilities and 
programs. Several studies have shown that visitors are willing to pay entrance and recreation 
fees to support high-quality facilities and services. Appendix C lists more than 50 resources 
that are available from state, federal and foundation sources for recreation, infrastructure, 
historic and cultural projects. 

Action C.7.1 : Consider Selective &lor Local Option Taxes on Goods & Services Used by Tourists 

Consider selective taxes on services used primarily by travelers, such as hotels, car rental, 
outfitted services, etc. Allow cities and counties to pass local option taxes, which target goods and 
services used by travelers to support local facilities and services for both residents and visitors. 
Responsibility: Leg, MACo, MLCT, BTA, Biz 



Ad-Ad Ag(ncy.Attn-Altraction.BU-Bu$ine»,BTA -BusinMS Trade A«n,CC<hainbCT of Conunerce.DLI-Dept. of I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-Depl. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commerce.DOR-Dept. of Revenue.Exl-F.xInwion Service 

124 CHAPTERS: Priority Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Action C.7.2 : Evaluate Expansion of User Fees for Public Facility Recreation 

Consider user fees, such as the federal fee demo program or state recreation fees, to supplement 
revenues for maintenance and operation of recreation sites and facilities. Focus on activities/users that 
currently do not pay fees through recreation vehicle licensing (e.g. activities such as hiking, mountain 
biking, float boating, cross-country skiing, tent camping, etc.). Work with the Interagency Recreational 
Fee Demonstration Program Coordination Task Force. Responsibility: SA, FA, NPO 

Action C.7.3 : Encourage Attractions to Generate more Revenue from Visitors 

Help local attractions (museums, parks, etc.) develop revenue programs to support maintenance 
and operations, such as entrance fees, "friends" groups, corporate sponsors/donations, gift shops, 
education activities, VIP cards, etc. Include ways to address the needs of local residents, school groups, 
etc., so that they are able to access local facilities. Responsibility: MHS, FWP, MRPA, DOC, NPO, Biz 

Action C.7.4 : Develop Local/Regional Revenue- Sharing Visitor Packages 

Create local/regional visitor packages, with a percent of the purchase price dedicated to support 
asset maintenance and operation needs. Promote the packages through state and regional promotions, 
web sites, businesses and tour brokers/agents. Responsibility: TR, CVB, DOC, Biz, Attn, NPO 

Action C.7.5 : Create a "Montana Visitor Passport" Program, with a Portion of Proceeds from Passport 
Sales used to Support Local/ Regional Tourism Efforts 

Develop a statewide passport program that visitors can purchase for admission to a variety of 
attractions and events statewide. Include in the price a dedicated percentage to support asset 
maintenance/operation needs. Promote the passports through Dept. of Commerce, tourism regions, 
agencies and businesses. Responsibility: MTRI, DOC, TR, Attn, NPO, Biz, Ad 

Action C.7.6 : Seek Additional Revenue for the Block Management Program 

Enhance the amount of reimbursement for farmers and ranchers who agree to participate in the 
block management program, to help mitigate costs of impacts from allowing public access to private 
lands for hunting and fishing. Responsibility: FWP, LO, NPO 



Comments about User Fees 
PRO: 

• 'Fees are an important source of funds to 
provide quality recreation experiences and seem 
to be readily accepted when they provide direct 
support to and enhance the quality of the 
facilities being used. ' 

• 'The whole thing to me is about balance. We 
were asked to be "stewards" not "curators' of 
these lands and resources. ...I strongly support 
fees for use, limiting access where there needs 
to be limits and private sector use and 
development of appropriate types of tourism and 
other industry on more of Montana 's lands. " 

• 'I'm a firm believer in user fees but we have to 
be careful not to simply create new taxes. The 
federal fee demo program is starting to work ok 
<S could be used as an example of how user fees 
can be dedicated to pay for maintenance 4 
development of infrastructure. ' 

CON: 

• Recreation fees ore likely to affect some 
visitors enough economically that they decide to 
recreate in non-fee areas. (USPS Exec. 
Summary, Fee Demo) 

• 'Be sure to have specific goals A objectives 
when thinking of fees and taxes. We want to 
encourage tourism not detour it. ' 

• 'The fee issue has a lot of concerns and 
downright opposition to it. There are some 
systemic questions that need to be addressed 
before we jump into fees. ' 

• 'No user fees for residents to support tourism!" 

Source: Online Survey (except where noted) 



'Block Management needs lots more money to 

make it attractive to farmers and ranchers. ' 

- Online Survey Participant 



FA-Federal Agency .Leg-Legislalure,LG-Local Gov't.LO-Land Owners,MTC=Montana Tourism Coalition,NPO=Non-Profil Org'n,SA-Slate Agency.TAC-Tourism Advisory CouncilTR-Tourism RegioniTtb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Chapter 5: PRioRrrv Objectives & Actions 1 25 



Measures of Success for Objective C.7 : 

♦ Amount of additional funding generated for asset maintenance & operations 

♦ Success of selective/local option tax programs 

♦ Success of user fee programs 

♦ Number of revenue-generating programs implemented by attractions 

♦ Number of revenue-sharing visitor packages developed, and funding generated 

♦ Number of passports sold, and funding generated 

♦ Amount of additional revenue generated for Block Management Program 



'decision is the spark that 
ignites action. Until a decision 
is made, nothing happens. " 

- Wilfred A. Peterson 



'By working together, all of us can 
accomplish more. This is a critical piece 
to the whole puzzle of economic 
devehpment in Montana. Each piece of 
that puzzle has to be willing to give a 
little in exchange for some of the take. " 
- Online Survey Porticipont 



C.8 Objective: Develop Partnerships to Facilitate Implementation of Strategic Plan 

Considerable time, effort and money was invested to create this Strategic Plan document. 
The Plan is intended to be page-worn, dog-earred and well-used by tourism and recreation 
stakeholders at all levels - not just by Department of Commerce and MTRI. It is designed to 
provide a blueprint for implementation - a roadmap to achieving the vision and goals defined 
by Montanans through public input during the planning process. Regional tourism 
organizations are slated to play a critical role in Plan implementation - requiring them to 
expand their mission and roles beyond that of just tourism promotion. The Plan will not be 
implemented unless all stakeholders take responsibility for their own participation - and form 
partnerships to accomplish the objectives and actions described in this chapter. Chapter 6 
provides more detail about the implementation priorities, timeline and organizational needs. 
However, first the actions listed below must be addressed so that implementation can proceed. 

Action C.8.1 : Conduct Workshops in Each Region to Discuss Plan Implementation 

Schedule implementation workshops during 2003 in each tourism region, with MTRI 
representatives, and other stakeholders, to discuss the actions, timeline and responsibilities included in 
the Plan, and roles of key stakeholder groups. Responsibility: TR, DOC, CVB, SA, FA, NPO, Biz 

Action C.8.2 : Conduct Training for RegionlCVB Boards of Directors & Members 

Help build the capacity of regional tourism organizations and CVBs to enable them to fill their 
critical role in the implementation of this Strategic Plan. Provide training in planning, organizational and 
partnership development, collaborative problem-solving, conflict resolution, and effective marketing. 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Aim-Allractk)n.Bl2-Bu»4ne»»,BTA -Biuineu Trade Assn,CC-Chamber of Commerce.DU-Depl. of Labor & lnd.,UOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC-Dept. of Commerce,DOR-Depl. of Revenue.Ext-Exlenslon Service 

126 CHAPTERS: PRiORnTT Objectives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pijvn 2003-2007 



Schedule training in 2003, perhaps in conjunction with the Strategic Plan implementation workshops 
described in Action C.8.1. Responsibility: TR, CVB, DOC 



Action C.8.3 : Obtain Funding to Enhance Regional Tourism Organizations 

Apply for economic development funds through the U.S. Economic Development 
Administration (EDA) and/or USDA Rural Development (RBEG/RBOG grants), or similar programs, to 
expand capacity of regional tourism organizations so they can broaden their missions/outreach to 
address tourism challenges. Assist regions in strengthening their capacity to build partnerships with 
private, public, tribal and nonprofit organizations to address local/regional issues related to tourism and 
recreation. Help them develop strategic programming that will increase revenues from high-value, low 
impact visitors, particularly during off-peak times, consistent with local values. 
Responsibility: DOC, TR, TAC, FA 



'IVork towards 'working together, 
cooperation, etc.,' rather than 'have 
it my way or not at all' attitude. ' 

- Online Survey Porticipont 



Action C.8.4 : Coordinate Strategic Plan Implementation & Monitoring through Dept. of Commerce 

Continue to assign responsibility for Strategic Plan coordination and monitoring to the MTRI 
Coordinator at Department of Commerce. Include responsibility to communicate not only with MTRI, 
but also with the regions & CVBs, advisory team and other stakeholders about the status of Strategic Plan 
implementation. Consider joint planning effort between DOC and FWP for 2008-2012 Tourism and 
Recreahon Strategic Plan and Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP). 
Responsibility: DOC, MTRI, FWP 



Action C.8.5 : Form an Implementation Team ofPrivatelPubliclTriballNonprofit Representatives 

Create a Strategic Plan Implementation Advisory Team consisting of key representatives from 
stakeholder groups (private, public, tribal, nonprofit). Schedule one or two meetings annually to discuss 
the implementation status of Strategic Plan actions. Address successes and challenges, and ways to 
overcome obstacles. Encourage stakeholder representatives to identify ways in which their respective 
organizations can assist with implementation, develop partnerships, or seek resources to support the 
program. Responsibility: DOC, TAC, MTC, MTRI, Trb, NPO, Biz 

Action C.8.6 : Coordinate Implementation with Governor's Office of Economic Opportunity 

Ensure that key components of the Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan are included in the 
Business Montana Strategy for Economic Growth. Coordinate with the Governor's Office of Economic 
Opportunity to address tourism and recreation issues, and to link tourism with other economic 
development initiatives (business recruitment, retention). Responsibility: DOC, MTC, BTA, MEDA 




FA-Federal Agency,l.eg-=Legislature,LG=l.ocal Gov't.LOLand Owners,MTC«Montana Tourism Coalilion.NI'ONon-Profit Org'n,SA-State Agency,! AC-Tourism Advisory Council, TR-Tourism Regions,Trb-Tribes 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 ChaiterS: Priorit\ Objectives & Actions 127 



Action C.8.7 : Develop a User-Friendly System of Annual Reporting on Status of Strategic Plan 

Create an annual Strategic Plan Report Card, which provides an update of implementation 
status. Provide user-friendly mechanisms for implementation partners to report 

progress/successes/challenges to the Implementation Coordinator. Provide copies of the Report Card to 
the TAC, MTRI, Advisory team, regions/CVBs, stakeholder groups, elected officials, and give a 
presentation on successes/challenges at the annual Governor's Conference on Tourism & Recreation. 
Responsibility: DOC, MTRI, TR, CVB, NPO, MTTA 



Tf we did all the things we are 
capable of doing, we would 
literally astound ourselves. " 

- Thomas A. Edison 



Measures of Success for Objective C.8 : 

♦ Positive participant evaluations of implementation workshops and training for regions 

♦ Amount of funding obtained to build capacity of tourism regions 

♦ Participation in Advisory Implementation Team, and accomplishments 

♦ Linkages between Tourism Strategic Plan & Montana Strategy for Economic Growth 

♦ Success of Plan coordination, monitoring and reporting, lead by Department of Commerce 

♦ Combination of Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan and SCORP for 2008-2012 



Ad-Ad Agency ,Attn-Allraftlon.Blz-BustneM,ffTA -Business Trade A^sn.CC-Chambcr of Commerce,DI.I-Depl. of I jbor & Ind.,DOAg-Dept. of Ag,DOC-Depl. of Commcrci>,IXlR-Depl. of RevenueExl-Exteiwion Servke 

1 28 CuAiTKR 5: Priority Objictives & Actions Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Pian 2003-2007 



"It is strategic thinking and acting that are important, not strategic planning." 

- John Bryson, Strategic Planning for Public & Nonprofit Organizations 

A. Implementation Process & Steps 

Strategic implementation begins with building awareness and creating a team. The first 
step is formal adoption of the Strategic Plan by the Tourism Advisory Council, and distribution 
of the Plan statewide. The next step - and a critical one - is to build advocacy and obtain formal 
endorsements of the Plan from as many tourism and recreation stakeholder groups as possible. 
Ideally, these would be in the form of resolutions passed by boards of tourism regions, CVBs, 
economic development groups, nonprofit organizations, business trade associations, inter- 
agency committees like MTRI, tribal councils, MTTA, elected officials, etc. 

The third step is to form partnerships and assign responsibilities for specific actions and 
tasks. Some tasks can begin immediately with very little cost, while others will require more 
time to develop partnerships and resources. Fourth is to seek funding and technical resources 
for implementation of top priority actions. Appendix C contains a list of federal, state, local, 
private and nonprofit foundation resources that will support the actions identified in this Plan. 

The fifth step is to build the capacity of regional tourism organizations through training 
and other resources, so that they can lead the team-building and implementation efforts at the 
local level. Enhancements to the regional organizations may include additional staffing, 
refinements to the membership of their boards of directors (recruit additional partner 
representatives), expansion of orgaruzation membership, formalized programs of work, 
expanded committees, etc. This step also includes fortifying the communication network with a 
statewide tourism and recreation listserv and online newsletter. 

The sixth step is to begin implementation of top priority actions (see section 6.C). It is 
important to focus on "base hits" (incremental successes) rather than "home runs": build 
momentum to engage partners and create successes. Finally, the seventh step is to monitor and 
evaluate the results of implementation, and adjust as appropriate. 

Steps 1 and 2 should begin with the Tourism Advisory Council meeting in October 2002. 
Steps 3, 4 and 5 should get underway in late Fall 2002 and be well advanced by mid-2003, so 
that implementation of the plan has begun by the second quarter of 2003. Steps 6 and 7 are 
ongoing through 2007. 



Chapter 6: 
Implementation 

A. Implementation Process 
& Steps 

B. Organization, Roles & 
Resources 

C. Priority Projects & Action 
Table 



'Eyen if you're on the right track, you'll 
get run over if you just sit there. ' 

- Will Rogers 



Implementation Steps 

1. Adoption of Strategic Plan by 
J AC, 4 statewide distribution 

2. Endorsement by other 
stakeholder groups 

3. Form partnerships to assign tasks 

4. Seek funding A other resources 

5. Build capacity of tourism regions, 
communication network 

6. Begin implementation 

7. Monitor results 4 evaluate/adjust 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 6: Implementation 



129 



B. Organization, Roles & Resources 



'The whole is as necessary to the 
understanding of its parts, as 
the parts are necessary to the 
understanding of the whole. ' 

- Mach's Principle 



'See problems as opportunities 
for growth: there are no 
roadblocks, only speed bumps. ' 



B.l Existing "System" of Tourism & Recreation has Strengths, Growing Pains 

Montana's current "system" of tourism and recreation program implementation is led at 
the state level (Figure 6.1). Tourism promotion and development are the responsibility of the 
Dept. of Commerce Promotion Division. Research is conducted by the U of M Institute for 
Tourism & Recreation Research (ITRR). Recreation management is the responsibility of the 
FWP, and heritage and culture are managed by the Montana Historical Society, Montana Arts 
Council and Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance. Trcuisportation is managed by MDT. 
Collection/disbursement of lodging tax is managed by Dept. of Revenue (DOR). Federal 
agencies involved in tourism and recreation are the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, 
BLM, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, FHWA, FAA, Corps of Engineers and Bureau of 
Recleimation. Funding and public policy decisions are made by the Legislature and Congress. 

At the regional and local levels, tourism promotion and development are led by regional 
tourism organizations, CVBs and chambers of commerce. Recreation management is the 
responsibility of city, county and tribal recreation staff, and local park districts. Heritage and 
culture are managed by local and regional historical societies, arts commissions and cultural 
councils. Transportation is handled by county and local road districts and airport boards. 



Figure 6.1: Existing System of Tourism <S Recreation 
Communication, Organization Relationships d Funding 



I «<yiilBlinfl*un^w 



Fvw>. MHS. Myr, 

0»nr SMa^Ktoril 
. MTW, UnTA 



08()( of CorTmerce 

Promobon Div. 

(TrsMiMcrtn) 




ITRR 



TAC 



Ad Agency 



Businesses. Tnbes 
& ConYnuNtos 

■ L. ^ 



Tourtatt 



>>n»erv«t'n. Sportsmen 



Trade Grot^n/MTC 



Nonprofits 



Citizens and businesses are involved through local recreahon, sports, conservation, 
business, community service or sportsmen's organizations and clubs. Funding and 
public policy decisions are made or influenced by city councils, county 
commissioners and organization boards of directors. 

The current system has succeeded in building and supporting tourism in the 
1990s. The system's vertical structure has been efficient for decision-making cmd 
funding during high growth. However, some key stakeholders are not formally 
included in the process, and potential resources are untapped. With growth comes 
growing pains, and the need for strategic action. Tourists now receive many 
messages from many sources - and sometimes the messages are inconsistent or 
even conflicting. Therefore, the current structure needs some refinement to 
facilitate the horizontal communication, partnership-building and teamwork that 
will be required to implement the actions described in the previous chapter. 



30 



Chapter 6: Implementation 



MOhJTANA tourism & RECREATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 



a 



B.2 Refined System will Foster Team Approach to Communication & Funding 



The refined "system" of tourism and recreation program implementation has a more 
horizontal structure, reflecting its emphasis on collaboration and supportive partnerships 
(Figure 6.2). It places tourists at the top of the structure to focus on a market-driven approach 
which meets the needs of both Montanans and nonresident visitors. The six regional tourism 
organizations are the center of the system, reflecting their enhanced role in facilitating local and 
regional leadership in implementing strategic actions. A key concept in the refined system is to 
create more horizontal communication and partnership-building, both at the state level (led by 
Department of Commerce) and regional level (led by regional tourism organizations). 

The role of the Department of Commerce in handling statewide promotions - being the 
"keeper of the state's image" does not change, nor does the statutory responsibility of the 
Tourism Advisory Council (TAC) to oversee expenditures of funds by regions and CVBs. 
However, the role of the TAC and Department of Commerce focuses more on "big picture" 
strategic issues, rather than tactical issues, and on supporting a stronger system of regional 
orgaruzations, with the assistance of other state, federal and tribal partners. 

In order for actions in the Strategic Plan to be implemented successfully, and for tourism 
to be taken seriously as a bona fide economic development strategy at the local level, the 
regional organizations must expand the scope of their activities beyond just tourism promotion 



'The only limits are, as always, 
those of vision. ' 

- James Broughten 



When you help someone up the hill, 
you're that much nearer the top 
yourself. 



- they must become "players" - the "voice" for tourism and its role in 
regional/local plarming, economic development and conservation efforts. 

A key advantage to the refined system is its ability to tap 
additional resources: more partners bring more resources to the table. 
There are numerous federal, corporate and foimdation funds available 
for tourism and recreation-related projects, if they are linked to economic 
development, heritage/cultural programs, value-added agriculture, 
transportation, conservation cind education. By reaching out to other 
partners, tourism stakeholders can create win-win programs to achieve 
the vision and goals identified in this Strategic Plan. They therefore can 
preserve the lodging tax for its original intent: promotion, research and 
education, and they can work wdth partners to obtain other funds to 
accomplish additional actions that support community values and high- 
value, low-impact tourism and recreation. 



Figure 6.2: Refined System of Tourism A Recreation 
Communication, Organization Relationships & Funding 



state/Federal 
Support 
Partners 


Tourists: 
Montanans / Nonresidents 


RogKXKlAjxal 




/ 


\ 


Partners 


I 




DOC 

TAC 

State/Fed 
Agencies* 

UM/ITRR 

MTTA 

Ad Agency 


/ 


/ 


\ 


\ 


Biz's, Communities 

CVBs. Chambers 

Norvrofits 

Agencies, Tribes 

Trade Groups/MTC 

Conservabon/VyAWife 

Sportsmen 

Elected Officials 
(Fed. State. Local) 


c 

s 


/ 


6 Tourism 
Regions 


\ 


1 








< 


-A 1 K 
Impiemantaiion 


> 








Xr IX 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



* FWP. MHS. MDT. mac. DOR. MHPOC. UMVMSU. DNRC, USFS, BLM, NPS, USFWfS, COE, BIA, BOR 

Chapter 6: Implementation 131 



'Obstacles (v^ those frightful things 
you see when you take your eyes off 
the goal ' 

• Hannah More 



'Never tell people how to do things. 
Tell them what you want them to 
achieve and they will surprise you 
with their ingenuity. ' 

- General Seorge S. Patton 



'Vision is the world's most desperate 
need. There are no hopeless situations, 
only people who think hopelessly. ' 

- Winifred Newman 



C. Priority Projects & Action Table 

This Strategic Plan identifies many objectives and strategic actions, as detailed in 
Chapter 5. However, not all of those actions are of equal priority. Table 6.1 on the next three 
pages lists all 22 objectives and 94 actions, and assigns a priority to each action (priority 1, 2 or 
3), with approximate implementation dates (2003-2007) and partners. Actions listed as priority 
1 will begin immediately with focused emphasis. Priority 2 actions will receive less emphasis, 
or begin later, and priority 3 actions will have lower emphasis still, or begin after 2005. Some 
actions are ongoing from current or previous efforts, and are assigned a priority based on the 
planning team's recommendation of relative importance to achieving the strategic vision and 
goals. The timeline is identified by shaded boxes under each of the five years. The darker 
shading indicates a more intense level of activity during that year for a particular action. 

The top priority actions for immediate implementation are listed below. In determining 
priorities, the planning team considered the context of current tourism trends and challenges, as 
well as balance and capacity among implementation partners and resources. 

Conduct implementation workshops with TAC/regions/CVBs/stakeholders in 2002 and 2003 

Form implementation team, seek fvmding and technical resources, create reporting system 

Identify funding partnership opportunities for projects and promotions 

Build awareness among citizens & elected officials of tourism's benefits and impacts 

Continue strategic advertising and promotions, coordinate between state and regions 

Focus on high-value, low-impact visitor market segments: develop Montana's niche in 

meeting/convention, heritage/cultural and winter markets 

Emphasize management of natural/historic/cultural assets that balances the needs of 

Montanans with nonresident use 

Address management issues related to access, non/motorized use, and invasive spedes 

Conduct strategic research, data collection, analysis and dissemination of information 

Establish a tourism & recreation listserv to strengthen communication and networking 

Continue to improve Montana's transportation network, sign guidelines 

Educate visitors about ethics and resjxjnsibilities on public & private lands 

Complete implementation of Lewis & Clark Interpretive Sign strategy 

Link value-added agricultural products with tourism businesses 

Assist businesses & communities through existing training and support programs 

Continue CTAP, TIIP and SEGP programs to provide resources to communities 



132 



Chapter 6: Implementation 



MOhJTANA TOURISM & RECREATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 



Table 6.1: Strategic Plan Objectives and Actions 



Objective 
Action 




Timing 


Partners 
(See page 136 for key to codes) 


Priority 


03 


04 


OS 


06 


07 


A. Managing Information iHHHHHHHRjjJHHHHIJ^IIB^ 














"fl^HHH^H'. 


A.l Maintain the AAontana Lxidging Tax for Tourism Promotion and Development 
















A. 1.1 Build citizen awareness about benefits/impacts of tourism and uses of lodging tax 


1 








DOC,-ni,CVB/WPfxt, BTA Jiz>U>rOJIITCXnMt.MTTA 


A.1.2 BuiM oworencsi among elected officials about tourism's impacts and benefits 


1 




■ 


■ 






TR,CVB.DOC.TAC>IHTC.»TA*lJI»TWJT»>JPO>HTrA 


A.1.3 Sceli endorsements from communities and "non-tourism* orgoniiotions 


2 




■ 


MTC^TA^PO.CVB.TR.OOC.'mB.TAC 


A.Z Conduct Strategic Pramotiens that Attract Top Priority Morfccts 




1 1 1 




A.2.1 Coordinate odvertising to maximize state, regional i private Return on Investment 


1 ^^^^^^^■■lAd.OOC.TR.CVB.Biz.Attn | 


A.2.2 Encourage cross-promotion between tourism partners and sectors 


2 


LI 


DOC./^d.DOAg.NPO.TH.STA.Trb.Bil 


A.2.3 Consider options for f ihn production incentives 


3 


■■■ 


DOC.T/^C.-re.CVB.Bii 


A.2.4 Plon for promotion of special events & chollenges 


3 








^^■■DOC.MLCBC,-ni.CVB>l>S.Mz>UfWP 


A.3 Ovota Nmr Tourism d Recreation Products through Pockoging 














2 








■re.CVB.Biz,Attn. NPO.0OC.Trb 


A J.2 Promote off-peak weekend getaway packages/events to "nearby" markets 


2 


^^^■■^■dOC,TR.B<z.CV8 


A.3.3 Capture more pass-through travelers with mini-pockages 


2 


b 








v^Biz.CVB.Attn.TR.DOC.Trb.CC | 


A.4 Create New "Destinations" with Special Designations A Events 


















2 




■i 




M0T.-ni.Trb/JPO.Biz>lHS.CVBA6.CC,0OC 


A.4.2 Use collaborative efforts to create special designation oreas 


2 Hi 






M0T,TR,CC,CV8.0OC.NPO,Trbi6,Bii 


A.4.3 Seek opportunities to host national/international sports competitions 


3 


^H 






CVB.8iz.TR,D0C,Le 


A.5 Enhance Montana's Winter Recreation Products/Services 
















A.5.1 Refine Montana's niche in the destination ski market i snowmobile markets 


1 


■HT' 








mH t>OC.BTA>d,Bil 1 


A.9.2 Pedoge skiing A snowfflobiling with other activities 


2 












8TA,-ni,CV8.Bi2,Attn>JPO 


A.5.3 Expand "oltemative" winter activities 


2 












TR,CC.CVB.Biz>»ttn>4PO. Trb 


A.6 Attract More Meetings A Conventions to Montana 


















1 ^H 








CVB.t>OC.BTA,Biz.AdJ-6 


determine feasibility of enhanced facilities 


2 


^1 






CVB.t>OC.BTA,Biz.AdA* 


A.6.2 Conduct training on the needs A trends of meeting/convention markets 


2 










IHcV8.DOC.Biz.BTA.Univ 


A.6.3 Use local historical/cultural attractions to enhance venue offerings 


2 










^^lcVB.T1l,BizXttnXAC.MHS, M>0 


A.7 Enhane* System of Tracking. Analysis A Information Diss«ii*Wttal for Stakeholders 












n 


A.7.1 Continue strategic reseorch about resident & nonresident travelers 


' ■■"■' tai''**'i|^MTTT>o aaCD r«v TAC.TR>U.CBC.SA.FA,Bi2 | 


A.7.2 Regukiriy measure Montonons' opinions about tourism & recreation 


' m—T^r 


ITW».t>OC,TACJWTRI.SA.FA.Biz 


A.7.3 Conduct rsgulor conversion research to meosure results of marketii^ efforts 


' ^N ' 


OOC.TRJ1W>M.CVB 


A.7.4 EstobHsh a csntrol 'clearinghouse* for dota collection, analysis and reporting 


' pC 






ITRR.DOC.-ra.M"n«IXVB>»ttn3iz. MTTA 


A.7.9 Ovate statewide 'baseline' database of tourism 4 recreation assets 


' ON 






rnai.Doc,'m.oon.M'nu.BTA>u)PAjitTTA 


A.7A Enhance data-gathering systems at attrorttans 4 VIC'S 


' pj... 






MTl»I,Tl»,VIC.CV».CC.Trb.0OCJT1» 






mi 






DOft.DOC.BTAXn)ll 


A.7.8 Coordinate with the private sector for enhanced tracking/reporting 




_3mm 




CVB.CC.TR.BTAJTRfi.DOC 


A. 8 Create o Cofwiected System to Shore Information A Resources 




_-_P 






AJ.1 Create tourism 4 recreotkxiNstserv to shore information 






ITTiR,D0C,MTC,«7T»I>»TTA,TR>»0 


A.8.2 CIrcate a database of tourism/recreation technical & funding resources 








DOC,MEDA,BBER.MRDP.DLI 


AJ.3 Shore information about state/regional advertising pkins to facilitate coordination 








DOC.Ad.TR.CVB.Biz 


A.8.4 Enhonce sharing of tourism 4 recreation photo librories 








0OC,TR,CVB.NPO,«*TRI 



Montana Touiusm & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 6: Implementation 



133 



Table 6.1: Strategic Plan Objectives and Actions 



ObjccttM 




Timing 


Partners 
(See page 136 for key to codes) 


AcHon 


M . 


03 


04 


09 


06 


07 




B. Managing the Use of Assets 














l^^^^M. 


t.l Sock Bolancc Between Asset Protection A VisHor/Business Kkeds 
















B 1 1 Comp-k on invcntory/cvokiotian of noturd/hrftonc/cultijral osscts i fodHtii* 














SAfAJrtXBHPOJUlMnXMIlPA 


ri2 Select imnagcinefltoptieMttiat emphasize baiancedrcstdmt and nMrotdmtuM 




L 








"MSA,FA.TttXtMPOJUx 1 


• 13 Develop system of allocated use in sensitive areas 






■! 




■^ 


SA.FA.Trb>»0A«9/«W C«iiimis.,OU 








1 






0LB^«g4AfABTA 


•JJ Address motorized vs non-motorized recreation user conflicts 


1 ^M 






■| 


SA,FA.NPOiO.BizJ.6 














■| 


SA,FA,DOAg.RC4D,NPOW>*I, 


B.I 7 Enco«jra9C appropriate use of land conservancy programs 














F.^,C)OAg,Exti.O.NPO 


1.2 Address Access Issues on Public A Private Lands A Wotari 












_J 




BZl S<4>port implementation of strategies to improve access to puUkhndi A «nt«rt 


' ^^ 




■sA^A.TrbX>0^0 


m Expand the Bledt Management Program for access to private londs 


« LB 




T FWP,LO.TI».NPO 


•.2.3 Use special groups to f ocilitatc discussion of access to pubNc/private lands A waters 


' w^^ 




SA,FA.NPO.T1».Trb 


B.3 Develop an Enhanced Tronspertation System in IWontana 














BJ.1 Advance implementation of Montana's rest oreo strategy 




_ 
^ 








,_g MDT.DOC,-re^.VIC>VO 


tj.2 Continue to improve roods and bridges: oddress mointenonce bueWo9 










I^H MI>T^/A>tACoM£T 


•J J Wor* «ith air corriers/oirports to identify needs A enhance air service 




1 






^^^■mot,doc.tr,cvb.b<z 


•.3.4 Advocate for passenger roil service 








|^^|DOC.TAC.TR,CVB.Biz>U>T 


B3 5 Worti urith car rentol ogencles to identify needs 4 enhance jervieef 








|^^|TR.CV8.CC.Biz 


B36 Identify opportimtles for tronsit/shuttic transportation in major destination oreas 












■a|AM)T,-m,a.NPS,Attn,BizJWLCTJWACo 


B 3 7 Enhance Montono's trail system 




, 








■ M0TJ«TRI,STAC,NPO.L6,Trb,BizJ.O 


















B.4.1 EnhoKe stole rest areas i VlCs with Montana highlights 














M0T.DOC,0OA9,-re,CVB,VIC,CC*iJ^J=>WP 


B 4 2 Educate visitors about ethics and responsibilities on piMk A friMf tandf 














MTM>»OfWP 








MTPI.MLCBCJWHS,DOC.MDTfWP 












MHS.FA.Trb.Univ.FWP 


1.9 iNprova Stotcsridc System of Highway Signs 












B91 Develop/implement sign guidelines for servifS. attractions A huliHitwi 




1 










MbT.DOC.TIl>MCo.MLCT^z>tHSJTA,Trb. MTTA 






■ 






MDT.Docmjii 






H 


IK 


amm 


TR,MDT.BIzJ>WCoJWLCT 


B.6 Assist Comraunitias to Enhance Focilitics/Sarviccs for Tourism Development 




r 






B 6 1 Continue Community Tourism Assessment (CTAP) i Tourism Inf rortructure Improvement (1UP) 


1 ^^^^^^^^^■Doc.te.Ext.i-niR 


tjb2 Encourage review of city/county/tribol infrastriicture & public services 




m 


B 


-J 


L6.Jrt,MjCT/MCe.'nt*OJttx 


BAJ Enhance heritage/cultural facilities & attractions to meet visitor needs 








m 


MHSMAC.Trb/JPOJix/** 


B.6.4 Encouroge community portidpation in the Notional Main Street Program 












DOC,MLCTJttEt)A,MHS 


tA3 Encourage commtmties to use strategic planning & development tools 


2 1^ 






^ 


MLCT,MACo,t)OC,M£DA 



Chapter 6: !MPLEME^^•AT!ON 



MONTANA TOURBM k RECREATION STRATEQC PLAN 2003-2007 



Tobic 6.1: Strategic Plan Objectives and Actions 



Objective 
Action 




Timing 


(See page 1 36 for key to codes) 


Priority 


03 


04 


OS 


06 


07 


C. Creating Teams 
















C.l Identify Opportunities to Unk Agriculture with Touriim 


















1 ^^^■^^^^■DOAgJTA.TRXXJiz 


C.I.Z Enhance existing programs with focus on tourist moHccts 


' ^|^T^^^HDOAg,DOC>l>O.Bii,™ 


C.1.3 Develop cooperative morl<eting compaigns between ogrtcuihirc and tourism 






■^H 


DOC.Ad.BTA.Biz.0OAg 


C.1.4 Educate visitors about Montana agriculture & ranching 






iH 


DOAg,-nt,CVBX>O.Biz 


C.2 Create Partnerships to Address Asset Management A Fundii^ Needs 














C.2.1 Identify opportunities for portncrships to address asset needs 








o 




M'mi.SA.FAX>O.TR.Biz.Trb 


C2.2 Evaluate ogency rcgulotions i policies to determine differences in priorities/programs 


' F '^ 








MTU 


C2.3 Encourage citizens to volunteer for asset maintenance projects 












iBsA^A.NPO,Trb 


C.l Increase Awareness i Utilization of Business Assistance Programs 












n 


C.3.1 Provide information about business assistance to tourism 4 recreation businesses 




H 




n^H^^^rsnr -re bt* utTA | 


C3.2 Offer cntrcprencurship i monogcment training for tourism A recreation businesses 










^^^■rtfvurv-TDgiz 1 


C3.3 Address workforce issues & training programs 










^" 


DLI.TU 


C.3.4 Encourage financial lending to provide capital for tourism i recreotion businesses 


' K 










DOCSBOCjMEOA 


CA Identify Business Opportunities to Serve Visitors on Public Lands 
















C.4.1 Identify opportunities for new or enhanced tourism/recreation services 




■P^^qiHsA.FA.Biz 1 


C.4.2 Discuss woys to simplify regulations A permitting processes while protecting assets 








SAfA>«>0,BTAJiz 


C.4.3 Investigate contracting of mointenance operotions to private businesses 






«iL. 


SA,FA 


C.9 Enhance Atontona's "Edu-Structurc" to Support Tourism 






_xTj_ 




C.5.1 Expand education programs for tourism & recreation careers 




1 


^■^^^^^^^^^^^^■univ.Ext.TAC^iz | 


C.S,2 Develop o staff training program for VIC's 




■ 






D0C.VIC,1T»,CVB,CC 


CS.3 Provide regional familiarization tours for stote/regionol/tribal/local tourism staff 














TT».DOC,VIC^tfn.Biz 


C.9.4 Include educational presentations at tourism i recreation meetings i events 






B 








TAC,-n»,CVB,MTM 


C.5.5 Work with MSU to create 'tourism extension agents' in each tourism region 












... 


MSU.DOC.DOAg.'ra 


C.6 Build Funding Partnerships to Leverage Existing Dollars 
















C.6.1 Encourage strategic partnerships for cooperative project funding 


1 )P^tannBdllHsA.FA.-ni.CVB.CC.Biz>«>0 1 


C.6.2 Identify opportunities to pool public i private marketing dolkrs 




i^-re run giz.DOC,Attn>*d 


C.7 Devdop Additional Funding Sources for Tourism A Recreation 




3 


C.7.1 Consider selective and/or lacd option taxes on goods A services used by tourists 


> ■■ 1 


^■Lc9;WACo>tLCT.BTA,Biz 


C.7.2 Evoluote expansion of user fees for public facility recreation 






-^WM 




SA,FA,NPO 


C7.3 Encourage attractions to generate more revenue from visitors 














MHS.FWP^WPADOOJPO^Z 


C.7.4 Develop local/regional revenue-shoring visitor poetages 




P 








TT>,CVB,0OC.Biz>»ttn>*>O 


C7.9 Create a 'Atontano Visitor Passport' program 




— c 








MTRI.DOC.TB^tttn.NPO.Biz.Ad 


C.7.6 Seek additional revenue for the Slock Management program 




^^^^^^^^FWPJLOfrO 


C.S bevelop Partnerships to Facilitate Implemcntotion of Strategic Plan 




~n 










C.8.1 Conduct workshops at TAC meeting i in each region to discuss plan implementation 




■ 








'ni.DOC.CVB.SAfA>f>O.Biz 


C.8.2 Conduct training for region/CVB boards of directors A members 




r 






•re.cyB.DOc 


C.8.3 Obtain funding to enhance regional tourism organizations 




■iV" 


■ 


DOC.-re.TACFA 


CAA CeardinatB Strategic Plan in^emcntation A monitoring through DOC 












DOCJ«TRI.FWP 


CSJ Form on implementation team of privnte/public/tribai/nonprof it represenhithies 












DOC.TACjMTCJM-rei.Trt/VOJiz 














DOC>»TC,BTAJ»EDA 


C.8.7 Develop o user-friendly system of annual reporting on stotus of strategic pk)n 












DOCJ«TM.-re,CVB.NPO.MTTA 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Chapter 6: Implementation 



135 



Action Table Key to Codes 



Ad Advertising Agency MHS 

Attn Attraction MLCT 

Biz Private Sector Business AALCBC 

BTA Business Trade Associations MRDP 

BBER Bureau of Business/Economic Devlpmt MRPA 

CC Chamber of Commerce MSU 

CVB Convention/Visitor Bureau MTC 

DLI Montana Dept. of Labor and Industry MTRI 

DOAg Montana Dept. of Agriculture MTTA 

DOC Montana Dept. of Commerce NPO 

DOR Montana Dept. of Revenue NPS 

Ext Ag Extension Service OLB 

FA Federal Gov' t/Agency RCAD 

FWP Montana Fish, Wildlife A Parks SA 

ITRR U of M Institute for Tourism 4 Recreation Research SBDC 

Leg Montana Legislature STAC 

L5 Local Government TAC 

LO Land Owner TR 

MAC Montana Arts Council '• Trb 

MACo Montana Association of Counties Univ 

MDT Montana Dept of Transportation VIC 

MEDA Montana Economic Developers Association 



Montana Historical Society 

Montana League of Cities A Towns 

Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial. Comm 

Montana Rural Development Partners 

Montana Recreation & Porks Association 

Montana State University 

Montana Tourism Coalition 

Montana Tourism & Recreation Intiative 

Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance 

Nten-prof it organizations 

National Park Service 

Montana Outfitter Licensing Board 

Resource, Conservation & Development 

Montana Gov' t/Agency/Dept/Commission 

Small Business Devlpmt Corporation 

State Trails Advisory Committee 

Tourism Advisory Council 

Montana Tourism Regions (Countries) 

American Indian Tribes 

Montana Universities & Colleges 

Visitor Information Center 



136 



Chapter 6: iMPLEMEhOTATioN 



MONfTANA TOURISM & RECREATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



A ppendices: 

A. Acronyms 

B. Montana Code Annotated 

C. Resources 

D. Reference Materials 



Appendices 



137 



(This page deliberately left blank.) 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendices 



A ppendix A: 
Acronyms 



AAA Automobile Association of America Gov 

Ad Advertising Agency HPDC 

Ag Agriculture & Ranching ITRR 

ARC American Recreation Coalition Leg 

Attn Attraction LG 

BBER Univ. of Montana Bureau of Business & Economic Research LO 

BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs LWCF 

Biz Business MABA 

BLM Bureau of Land Management MAC 

BMA Block Management Area MACo 

BOR Bureau of Reclamation MCF 

CC Chamber of Con\merce MDT 

aty City/Communities MEDA 

Co County MEPA 

COE US Army Corps of Engineers MHS 

CTAP Community Tourism Assessment Program MIAC 

CTEP Community Transportation Enhancement Program MIKA 

CVB Convention and Visitor Bureau MIM 

DLI Montana Department of Labor and Industry MLCBC 

DNRC Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation MLCT 

EXDAg Montana Department of Agriculture MOGA 

DOC Montana Department of Commerce MOU 

DOR Montana Department of Revenue MRDP 

DVMT Daily Vehicle Miles Traveled MRPA 

EDC Economic Development Corporation MSU 

EIS Environmental Impact Statement MTAVY 

EMS Emergency Medical Services MTC 

Ext Extension Office MTRI 

FA Federal Gov't/ Agency MTTA 

FIRE Fii»nce, Insurance, Real Estate NEPA 

FOAM Fishing Outfitters Association of Montana NPCA 

FVCC Flathead Valley Community College NPO 

FWP Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks NPS 

FY Fiscal Year OLB 

GIM Grown in Montana OHV 



Montana Governor's Office 

Montana Heritage, Preservation & Develop»ment Commission 

Univ. of Montana Institute of Tourism & Recreation Research 

Montana Legislature 

Local Government 

Land Owner 

Land and Water Conservation Fund 

Montana Agricultural Business Association 

Montana Arts Council 

Montana Association of Counties 

Montana Community Foundation 

Montana Department of Transportation 

Montana Economic Develojjers Association 

Montana Environmental Policy Act 

Montana Historical Society 

Montana Interagency Access Council 

Montana Innkeep)ers Association 

Made In Montana 

Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission 

Montana League of Cities & Towns 

Montana Outfitters & Guides Assodaticxi 

Memorandum of Understanding 

Montana Rural Development Partners 

Montana Recreation & Parks Association 

Montana State University 

MontanaAVyoming Tribal Leaders Coimdl 

Montana Tourism Coalition 

Montana Tourism and Recreation Initiative 

Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance 

National Environmental Policy Act 

National Parks Conservation Association 

Non-profit organizations 

National Park Service 

Montana Outfitters Licensing Board 

Off-Highway Vehicle (ATV's, off-road motorcycles & 4x4 use) 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix A: Acronyms 



A-1 



RC&D Resource, Conservation & Development 

Res Montana Residents 

RMEF Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation 

SA Montana State Agency/Dept/Commission 

SBDC Small Business Development Center 

SEGP Special Events Grant Program 

SH Superhost 

SHPO State Historic Preservation Office 

STAC State Trails Advisory Committee 

STICDA State Travel Information Center Directors' Alliance 

STIP MtHitana Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan 

TAC Tourism Advisory Council 

TCPU Transportation, Communication, Public Utilities 

TIA Travel Industry Association of America 

TUP Tourism Infrastructure Investment Program 

TM Travel Montana 

Tour Tour 

TR Tourism Regiorxs (Countries) 

Tib American Indian Tribes 

TTRA Int'l Travel and Tourism Research Association 

UBC Uniform Building Code 

UCADB Uniform Code for the Abatement of Dangerous Buildings 

UCBC Uniform Code for Building Conservation 

UM University of Montana 

Univ Montarta Universities/Colleges 

USDA US Department of Agriculture 

USDOC US Dept. of Commerce 

USDOI US Department of the Interior 

USDOR US Dept. of Revenue < 

USDOT US Department of Transportation 

USPS USDA Forest Service 

USFWS US Fish k Wildlife Service 

VFR Visiting friends and relatives 

VIC Visitor Information Center 

Vol Volunteers 



d 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strateqc Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix A: Acronyms 



A-2 



TITLE 15. TAXATION 
CHAPTER 65. LODGING FACILITY USE TAX 

Part 1. General Provisions 

15-65-101. Definitions. 

15-65-102. Rulemaking authority. 

15-65-103. through reserved. 

15-65-111. Tax rate. 

15-65-112. Collection and reporting. 

15-65-113. Audits — records. 

15-65-114. Registration number ~ application to department. 

15-65-115. Failure to pay or file — penalty — review — interest. 

15-65-116. Credit for overpayment — interest on overpayment. 

15-65-117. through reserved. 

15-65-121. Distribution of tax proceeds. 

15-65-122. Qualification of nonprofit entities for receipt of funds — limitation on admiiustrative costs. 

15-65-123. through reserved. 

15-65-131. State agencies to account for in-state lodging expenditures. 

15-65-132. through reserved. 

15-65-136. Terminated. 



A ppendix B: 

Montana Code 
Annotated 

•!• Lodging Facility Use Tax 

♦ Tourism Advisory 
Council 

♦ Resort Tax 

*> County Park Districts 



15-65-101. Definitions. For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply: 

(1) "Accommodation charge" means the fee charged by the owner or operator of a facility for use of the facility for lodging, including 
bath house facilities, but excluding charges for meals, transportation, entertainment, or any other similar charges. 

(2) (a) "Campground" means a place, publicly or privately owned, used for public camping where persons may camp, secure tents, 
or park individual recreational vehicles for camping and sleeping purposes. 

(b) The term does not include that portion of a trailer court, trailer park, or mobile home park intended for occupancy by trailers or 
mobile homes for resident dwelling purposes for periods of 30 consecutive days or more. 

(3) "Council" means the tourism advisory council established in 2-15-1816. 

(4) (a) "Facility" means a building containing individual sleeping rooms or suites, providing overnight lodging facilities for periods 
of less than 30 days to the general public for compensation. The term includes a facility represented to the public as a hotel, motel, 
campground, resort, dormitory, condominium irui, dude ranch, guest ranch, hostel, public lodginghouse, or bed and breakfast facility. 

(b) The term does not include any health care facility, as defined in 50-5-101, any facility owned by a corporation organized under 
Title 35, chapter 2 or 3, that is used primarily by persons under the age of 18 years for camping purposes, any hotel, motel, hostel, 
public lodginghouse, or bed and breakfast facility whose average daily accommodation charge for single occupancy does not exceed 
60% (jf the amount authorized under 2-18-501 for the actual cost of lodging for travel within the state of Montana, or any other faciUty 
that is rented solely on a monthly basis or for a period of 30 days or more. 

(5) "Nonprofit convention and visitors bureau" means a nonprofit corporation organized under Montana law and recognized by a 
majority of the governing body in the dty, consolidated city-county, resort area, or resort area district in which the bureau is located. 

(6) "Regional nonprofit tourism corporation" means a nonprofit corporation organized under Montana law and recognized by the 
council as the entity for promoting tourism within one of several regions established by executive order of the governor. 

(7) "Resort area" means an area established pursuant to 7-6-1508. 



Montana Tourism and recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated 



B-1 



(8) "Resort area district" has the meaning provided in 7-6-1531. 

15-65-102. Rulemaking authority. The department of revenue shall adopt such rules as may be necessary to implement and administer 
thisf>art. 

15-65-111. Tax rate. (1) There is imposed on the user of a facility a tax at a rate equal to 4% of the accommodation charge collected by 
the facility. (2) Accommodation charges do not include charges for rooms used for purposes other than lodging. 

15-65-112. Collection and reporting. (1) The owner or operator of a facility shall collect the tax imposed by 15-65-111. (2) The owner or 
operator shall report to the department of revenue, at the end of each calendar quarter, the gross receipts collected during that quarter 
attributable to accommodation charges for the use of the facility. The report is due on or before the last day of the month following the 
end of the calendar quarter and must be accompanied by a payment in an amount equal to the tax required to be collected under 
subsection (1). 

15-65-113. Audits - records. (1) The department of revenue may audit the books and records of any owner or operator to ensure that 
the proper amount of tax imposed by 15-65-111 has been collected. An audit may be done on the premises of the owner or operator of a 
facility or at any other convenient location. 

(2) The department may request the owner or operator of a facility to provide the department with books, ledgers, registers, or other 
documents necessary to verify the correct amount of tax. 

(3) The owner or operator of a facility shall maintain and have available for inspection by the department books, ledgers, registers, or 
other documents showing the collection of acconunodation charges for the preceding 5 years. 

(4) Except in the case of a person who, with intent to evade the tax, purposely or knowingly files a false or fraudulent return 
violating the provisions of this part, the amount of tax due under any return must be determined by the department within 5 years 
after the return is made, and the department thereafter is barred from revising any such return or recomputing the tax due thereorv and 
no proceeding in court for the collection of the tax may be irwtituted unless notice of any additional tax is provided within such period. 

(5) An application for revision may be filed with the department by an owner or operator of a facility within 5 years from the 
original due date of the return. 

15-65-114. Registration number - application to department. (1) The owner or operator of a facility shall apply to the department of 
revenue for a registration number. 

(2) The application must be made on a form provided by the department. 

(3) Upon completion of the application and delivery of the application to the department, the department must assign a registration 
number to the owner, operator, or facility, as appropriate. 

15-65-115. Failtu-e to pay or file - penalty - review - interest. (1) An owner or operator of a facility who fails to file the report as 
required by 15-65-112 must be assessed a penalty as provided in 15-1-216. The department may waive any penalty as provided in 15-1- 
206. 

(2) An owner or operator of a facility who fails to make payment or fails to report and make payment as required by 15-65-112 must 
be assessed penalty and interest as provided in 15-1-216. The department may waive any penalty pursuant to 15-1-206. 

(3) (a) If an owner or operator of a facility fails to file the report required by 15-65-112 or if the department determines that the report 
understates the amount of tax due, the department may determine the amount of the tax due and assess that amount agaiiut the owT»er 

B-2 Montana Tourism AND RECREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotath) 



or operator. The provisions of 15-1-211 apply to any assessment by the department. The taxpayer may seek review of the assessment 
pursuant to 15-1-211. 

(b) When a deficiency is determined and the tax becomes final, the department shall mail a notice and demand for payment to the 
owner or of)erator. The tax is due find payable at the expiration of 30 days after the notice and demand were mailed. Interest on any 
deficiency assessment must be computed as provided in 15-1-216. 

15-65-116. Credit for overpayment ~ interest on overpayment. (1) If the department determines that the amount of tax, penalty, or 
interest paid for any year is more than the amount due, the amount of the overpayment must be credited against any tax, fjenalty, or 
interest then due from the taxpayer and the balance refunded to the taxpayer, to the taxpayer's successor through reorganization, 
merger, or consolidation, or to the taxpayer's shareholders upon dissolution. 

(2) Except as provided in subsection (3), interest is allowed on overpayments at the same rate as is charged on impaid taxes, as 
provided in 15-1-216, from the due date of the return or from the date of overpayment, whichever is later, to the date the department 
approves refunding or crediting of the overpayment. 

(3) (a) Interest does not accrue during any period in which the processing of a claim for refund is delayed more them 30 days by 
reason of failure of the taxpayer to furnish information requested by the department for the purpwse of verifying the amount of the 
overpayment. 

(b) Interest is not allowed: 

(i) if the overpayment is refunded within 6 months from the date the return is due or from the date the return is filed, whichever is 
later; or 

(ii) if the amount of interest is less than $1. 

(c) Only a payment made incident to a bona fide and orderly discharge of actual tax liability or one reasonably assumed to be 
imposed by this chapter is considered an overpayment with respect to which interest is allowable. 

15-65-121. (Temporary) Distribution of tax proceeds. (1) The proceeds of the tax imposed by 15-65-111 must, in accordance with the 
provisions of 15-1-501, be deposited in an account in the state special revenue fund to the credit of the department. The department 
may spend from that account in accordcince with an expenditure appropriation by the legislature based on an estimate of the costs of 
collecting and disbursing the proceeds of the tax. Before allocating the balance of the tax proceeds in accordance with the provisions of 
15-1-501 and as provided in subsections (l)(a) through (l){e) of this section, the department shall determine the expenditures by state 
agencies for in-state lodging for each reporting period and deduct 4% of that amount from the tax proceeds received each reporting 
period. The amount deducted must be deposited in the fund or funds from which in-state lodging expenditures were paid by state 
agencies. The amount of $400,000 each year must be deposited in the Montana heritage preservation and development account 
provided for in 22-3-1004. The balance of the tax proceeds received each reporting period and not deducted pursuant to the 
expenditure appropriation, deposited in the fund or funds from which in-state lodging expenditures were paid by state agencies, or 
deposited in the heritage preservation and development account is statutorily appropriated, as provided in 17-7-502, and must be 
transferred to an account in the state special revenue fund to the credit of the department of commerce for tourism promotion and 
promotion of the state as a location for the production of motion pictures and television commercials, to the Montana historical society, 
to the university system, and to the department of fish, wildlife, and parks, as follows: 

(a) 1% to the Montana historical society to be used for the installation or maintenance of roadside historical signs and historic sites; 

(b) 2.5% to the university system for the establishment and maintenance of a Montana travel research program; 



Montana Tourism AND RECREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated B-3 



(c) 6.5% to the department of fish, wildlife, and parks for the maintenance of facilities in state parks that have both resident and 
nonresident use; 

(d) 67.5% to be used directly by the department of commerce; and 

(e) (i) except as provided in subsection (l)(e)(ii), 22.5% to be distributed by the department to regional nonprofit tourism 
corporations in the ratio of the proceeds collected in each tourism region to the total proceeds collected statewide; and 

(ii) if 22.5% of the proceeds collected annually within the limits of a dty, consolidated city<ounty, resort area, or resort area district 
exceeds $35,000, 50% of the amount available for distribution to the regional nonprofit tourism corporation in the region where the dty, 
consolidated dty-county, resort area, or resort area district is located, to be distributed to the nonprofit convention and visitors bureau 
in that dty, consolidated dty-county, resort area, or resort area district. 

(2) If a dty, consolidated dty-county, resort area, or resort area district qualifies under this section for funds but faik to either 
recognize a nonprofit convention and visitors bureau or submit and gain approval for an aruiual marketing plan as required in 15-65- 
122, then those funds must be allocated to the regional nonprofit tourism corporation in the region in which the dty, consolidated dty- 
county, resort area, or resort area district is located. 

(3) If a regional nonprofit tourism corporafion fails to submit and gain approval for an annual marketing plan as required in 15-65- 
122, then those funds otherwise allocated to the regional nonprofit tourism corporation may be used by the department of commerce 
for tourism promotion and promotion of the state as a location for the production of motion pictures and television commerdals. 
(Effective July 1,2007) 

15-65-121. (Effective July 1, 2007) . Distribution of Ux proceeds. (1) The proceeds of the tax Imposed by 15-65-111 must, in accordance 
with the provisions of 15-1-501, be deposited in an account in the state spedal revenue fund to the credit of the department. The 
department may spend from that account in accordance with an expenditure appropriation by the legislature based on an estimate of 
the costs of collecting and disbursing the proceeds of the tax. Before allocating the balance of the tax proceeds in accordance with the 
provisioiB of 15-1-501 and as provided in subsections (l)(a) through (l)(e) of this section, the department shall determine the 
expenditures by state agendes for in-state lodging for each reporting period and deduct 4% of that amount from the tax proceeds 
received each reporting period. The amount deducted must be deposited in the fund or funds from which in-state lodging 
expenditures were paid by state agendes. The balance of the tax proceeds received each reporting period and not deducted pursuant to 
tfie expenditure appropriation or deposited in the fund or funds from which in-state lodging expenditures were paid by state agendes 
is statutorily appropriated, as provided in 17-7-502, and must be transferred to an account in the state spedal revenue fund to the credit 
of the department of commerce for tourism promotion and promotion of the state as a location for the production of motion pictures 
and television commerdals, to the Montana historical sodety, to the uiuversity system, and to the department of fish, wildlife, and 
parks, as follows: 

(a) 1% to the Montana historical sodety to be used for the installation or maintenance of roadside historical signs and historic sites; 

(b) 2.5% to the uiuversity system for the establishment and maintenance of a Montana travel research program; 

(c) 65% to the department of fish, wildlife, and parks for the maintenance of fadlities in state parks that have both resident and 
nonresident use; 

(d) 67.5% to be used diredly by the department of commerce; and 

(e) (i) except as provided in subsection (l)(e)(ii), 22.5% to be distributed by the department to regional nonprofit tourism 
corporations in the ratio of the proceeds collected in each tourism region to the total proceeds collected statewide; and 

(ii) if 22.5% of the proceeds collected annually within the limits of a dty, consolidated dty-county, resort area, or resort area district 
exceeds $35,000, 50% of the amoimt available for distribution to the regional nonprofit tourism corporation in the region where tiie dty. 



B-4 MoffTANA Tourism AND RECREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated 



consolidated dty-county, resort area, or resort area district is located, to be distributed to the nonprofit convention and visitors bureau 
in that dty, consolidated city-county, resort area, or resort area district. 

(2) If a city, consolidated city-county, resort area, or resort area district qualifies under this section for funds but fails to either 
recognize a nonprofit convention and visitors bureau or submit and gain approval for an annual marketing plan as required in 15-65- 
122, then those funds must be allocated to the regional nonprofit tourism corporation in the region in which the dty, consolidated dty- 
county, resort area, or resort area district is located. 

(3) If a regional nonprofit tourism corporation fails to submit and gain approval for an annual marketing plan as required in 15-65- 
122, then those funds otherwise allocated to the regional nonprofit tourism corjwration may be used by the department of commerce 
for tourism promotion and promotion of the state as a location for the production of motion pictures and television commerdals 

15-65-122. Qualification of nonprofit entities for receipt of funds — limitation on administrative costs. (1) The department of revenue 
shall provide the council with quarterly reports of regional tax proceeds and tax proceeds of dties, consolidated dty-counties, resort 
areas, and resort area districts that qualify for disbursement of funds under 15-65-121. 

(2) Funds may not be disbursed to a regional nonprofit tourism corporation or nonprofit convention and visitors bureau until that 
entity has submitted an annual marketing plan to the council and that plan has been approved by the council. 

(3) A maximum of 20% of the funds received by a regional nonprofit tourism corfwration or nonprofit convention and visitors 
bureau may be used for administrative purposes as defined by the coundl. 

15-65-131. State agencies to account for in-state lodging expenditures. Each state agency shall account for in-state lodging 
expenditures in a manner that will enable the department to determine total expenditures for in-state lodging by state agendes in order 
to make an allocation of a portion of the tax proceeds imposed by 15-65-111 to the appropriate fund or funds as provided in 15-65-121. 
Unless prohibited under terms of original receipt of the funds used to pay the lodging fadlity use tax, each fund shall reimburse the 
state general fund for the deposit made pursuant to 15-65-121. 

TITLE 2. GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE AND ADMINISTRATION 
CHAPTER 15. EXECUTIVE BRANCH OFFICERS AND AGENCIES 

Part 18. Department of Commerce 

2-15-1816. Tourism advisory council. (1) There is created a tourism advisory coundl. 

(2) The coundl is composed of not less than 12 members appointed by the governor from Montana's private sector travel industry and 
includes at least one member from Indian tribal governments, with representation from each tourism region initially established by 
executive order of the governor and as may be modified by the council under subsection (5). 

(3) Members of the coimdl shall serve staggered 3-year terms, subject to replacement at the discretion of the governor. The governor 
shall designate four of the initial members to serve 1-year terms and four of the initial members to serve 2-year terms. 

(4) The coundl shall: 

(a) oversee distribution of funds to regional nonprofit tourism corporations for tourism promotion and to nonprofit convention and 
visitors bureaus in accordance with Title 15, chapter 65, part 1, and this section; 

(b) advise the department of commerce relative to tourism promotion; 

(c) advise the governor on significant matters relative to Montana's travel industry; 

(d) prescribe allowable administrative expenses for which accommodation tax proceeds may be used by regional nonprofit tourism 
corporations and nonprofit convention and visitors bureaus; 

Montana Tourism and recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated B^ 



(e) direct the university system regarding Montana travel research; 

(f) approve all travel research programs prior to their being undertaken; and 

(g) encourage regional nonprofit tourism corporations to promote tourist activities on Indian reservations in their regions. 

(5) The council may modify the tourism regions established by executive order of the governor. 

(6) The department of commerce shall adopt such rules as may be necessary to implement and administer Title 15, chapter 65, part 1, 
and this section. 

TITLE 7. LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

CHAPTER 6. FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION AND TAXATION 

Part 15. Resort Tax 

7-6-1501. Resort tax - definitions. 

7-6-1502. Resort community taxing authority — specific delegation. 

7-6-1503. Limit on resort tax rate - goods and services subject to tax. 

7-6-1504. Resort tax — election required - procedure — notice. 

7-6-1505. Resort tax administration. 

7-6-1506. Use of resort community tax revenues — bond issue — pledge. 

7-6-1507. Resort community tax - property tax relief. 

7-6-1508. Estabhshment of a resort area — taxing authority — approval by electorate. 

7-6-1509. Use of resort area tax. 

7-6-1510. through reserved. 

7-6-1531. Resort area district — definitions. 

7-6-1532. Resort area district authorized. 

7-6-1533. Petition to create resort area district. 

7-6-1534. Resort area district - notice of fjetition — hearing required. 

7-6-1535. Resort area district - hearing on petition. 

7-6-1536. Resort area district - election required - notice. 

7-6-1537. Conduct of election on question of creating resort area district. 

7-6-1538. Qualifications to vote on question of creating resort area district. 

7-6-1539. Resolution creating resort area district upon favorable vote. 

7-6-1540. Resort area district - certificate of incorporation from secretary of state. 

7-6-1541. General powers of resort area district. 

7-6-1542. Resort area district board p>owers related to administration and exjjenditure of resort tax revenue. 

7-6-1543. Resort area district to be governed by board - composition ~ qualifications ~ term of office. 

7-6-1544. Resort area district board — election ~ term. 

7-6-1545. Resort area district board election - canvass of vote. 

7-6-1546. Resort area district board - vacancy. 

7-6-1547. Resort area district board - meetings. 

7-6-1548. Referendum to dissolve resort area district. 

B-6 Montana TcxTOSM AND RECREATION Strateqc Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated 



7-6-1549. Conduct of election on question of dissolving resort area disbict — qualification of electors. 
7-6-1550. Resolution dissolving resort area district upon favorable vote. 

7-6-1508. Establishment of a resort area — taxing authority - approval by electorate. (1) The establishment of a resort area for the 
purpose of imposing a resort tax may be initiated by a written petition to the board of county commissioners of the county in which the 
area is located. The petition must contain a description of the proposed resort area and must be signed by at least 15% of the electors 
residing in the projwsed area. 

(2) The petition must include a proposal to impose a resort tax within the proposed resort area, including the rate, duration, effective 
date, and purpose of the tax as provided in 7-6-1504 . 

(3) Upon receiving a petition to establish a resort area, the board of county commissioners shall present the question to the electors 
residing in the proposed resort area as provided in 7-6-1504 . 

7-6-1531. Resort area district - definitions. For the purposes of 7-6-1531 through 7-6-1550. unless the context requires otherwise, the 
following definitions apply: 

(1) "Board" means the board of directors of the resort area district. 

(2) "Resort area" means a resort area created xmder 7-6-1508 . 

(3) "Resort area district" means a district created under 7-6-1531 through 7-6-1550 that has been established as a resort area under 7-6- 
1508 . 

TITLE 7. LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
CHAPTER 16. CULTURE, SOCIAL SERVICES, AND RECREATION 

Part 1. General Provisions Affecting Local Governments 

Part 2 through 20 reserved . 

Part 21. General Provisions Affecting County Goverrunent 

Part 22. County Museums and Facilities for the Arts 

Part 23. County Board of Park Commissioners 

Part 24. County Park Dishicts 

Part 25 through 40 reserved . 

Part 41. General Provisions Affecting Municipal Government 

Part 42. Mimicipal Board of Park Commissioners 

Part 43. Municipal Winter Work Program (Repealed. Sec. 25, Ch. 543, L. 1995) 

TITLE 7. LOCAL GOVERNMENT 
CHAPTER 16. CULTURE, SOCIAL SERVICES, AND RECREATION 

Part 24. County Park Districts 

7-16-2401. Park and recreation land — definition. 
7-16-2402. Duties of county park district. 
7-16-2403. Territory of county park district. 

Montana Tourism AND RECREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated B-7 



7-16-2404. through reserved. 

7-16-2411. Creation of county park district 

7-16-2412. Election on creation of district. 

7-16-2413. Formation of county park district — appointment of initial commission. 

7-16-2414. through reserved. 

7-16-2421. Election or appointment of commissioners. 

7-16-2422. Compensation of members of county park district commission. 

7-16-2423. Powers of county park district commission. 

7-16-2424. through reserved. 

7-16-2431. District budget - property tax levy or fee cm household. 

7-16-2432. Repealed. 

7-16-2433. Park district bonds authorized. 

7-16-2434. through reserved. 

7-16-2441. Alteration of district boundaries. 

7-16-2442. Dissolution of county park district 

7-16-2443. Effect of dissolution. 

7-16-2401. Park and recreation land - definition. As used in this part, "park and recreation land" means real property, buildings, and 
fixtures on: 

(1) land designated as park land or recreational land by the grant or deed of such land to the county; 

(2) land owned, leased, or otherwise possessed by a county and which the governing body of a county has designated as park or 
recreational land; 

(3) land t>elonging to a public or private entity or person who has donated the recreational rights to such land to a county park 
district on behalf of the county; or 

(4) land which, by agreement between an owner of land and a county park district, the district may use for park or recreational 
purposes. 



B-8 Montana Tourism AND RECREATION Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix B. Montana Code Annotated 



This Resources Appendix is arranged by Federal, State, Local, and Private sources of funding 
and technical assistance for projects related to tourism, recreation, business development, economic and 
community development, transportation, conservation and historic/cultural programs. Multiple 
programs that are available from a single source are presented in sub-listings under the source. For 
more information about each of the sources, contact the organization listed. 



Federal 



A ppendix C: 

Potential Resources 
for Funding & 
Technical Assistance 



Federal Multi-Agency 



■ Challenge Cost Share Program: USDA Forest Service (USPS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), National Park 
Service (NPS) 

DESCRIPTION: The Challenge Cost Share (CCS) program provides matching funds to non-federal organizations' contributions for projects that 
provide new or enhanced opportunity for protection of luitural/cultural/historic assets, interpretation, and recreation sites management. Once 
a project is approved, a cooperative agreement is prepared between the Agency and the partnership organization. Agency funding is made 
on a reimbursement basis for actual cost. The agreement requires some level of Agency involvement in the project. 

CONTACT: Bureau of Und Management, George Petemel, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings MT 59101, (406) 896-5037, 6petemel@mt.blm.gov. 
www.blm.g ov. USDA Forest Service, PO Box 7669, Missoula, MT 59807, Fax (406) 329-3347, www.fs.fed.us . National Park Service, Richard 
Williams (402) 221-3478 or Midori Raymore, (402) 221-3471, www.nps.gov/lecl/grants 

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 

■ Rural Business Enterprise Grants (RBEG) 

DESCRIPTION: RBEG grants provide Financing and facilitate development of small and emerging private business enterprises in rural areas 
(smaller than 50,000 population). Priority is given to applications for projects in open country, rural communities, and towns of 25,000 and 
smaller, and economically distressed conununities. 

AMOUNT: Variable amount. Costs that may be paid from grant funds include the acquisition and development of land, and the construction of 
buildings, plants, equipment, access streets and roads, parking areas, utility and service extensions, refinancing, fees, technical assistance, 
marketing, startup operatii\g cost and working capital. Grants may also be made to establish or fund revolving loan programs. 

CONTACT: USDA Rural Development Office, 900 Technology Blvd, Suite B, Bozemaa MT 59717, (406) 585-2545, William W. Barr, 
bill.barreimt.usda.gov.www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs.htm 

■ Rural Business Opportunity Grants (RBOG) 

DESCRIPTION: RBOG grants provide technical assistance, traiiung and platming activities that improve economic conditions in rural areas. 
REQUIREMENTS: Applicants must be located in rural areas (cities of less than 10,000 population). Nonprofit corporatioi\s and public bodies are 

eligible. 
CONTACT: USDA Rural Development Office, 900 Technology Blvd, Suite B, Bozemaa MT 59717, (406) 585-2545, WilUam W. Barr, 

bill.barr@mt.usda.gov. www.rurdev.u sda.gov/rbs.htm 

■ Resource Conservation & Development (RC&D) 

DESCRIPTION: The Resource Conservation & Development program encourages RC&D multi-county areas to plaa develop and carry out projects 
related to land conservation, water management, econonuc development and commuiuty sustainability. RC&D assists local units of 
government and nonprofit organizations to develop programs to improve their resources, and helps to secure technical and financial 



Federal Sources 



i 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2(X)7 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-1 



Federal Sources 



=:=ra 



assistance with grants, loans, and other hinding. A strong partnership exists between the NRCS, Montana Department of Natural Resources 
and Conservation (DNRC), and local RC&D councils. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) administers the RC&D program. 
CONTACT: RC&D Area contacts are listed in county telephone books under U.S. CovemmentAJ.S. Department of Agricultxu-e/Natural Resources 
Conservation Service, or visit www.nrcs.usda.gov.programs.rcd.offices.html . Montana RC&D gerwral information: 
www.mtjtrc8.isda.gov/rcd/index.asp 

USDA Value-Added Agricultural Product Market Development 

DESCRIPTION; A division of the USDA Rural Business Cooperative Service offering assistance and possible grant funding for value-added 

agricultural product producers. 
CONTACT: USDA Rural Development Office, 900 Technology Blvd. Suite B, Bozeman, MT 59717, (406) 585-2545, WiUiam W. Barr, 

bill.barr^mt.usda.gov. www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs.htm 

USDA Forest Service 

State and Private Forestry Grant Programs 

DESCRIPTION: The goal of the State and Private Forestry grant program is to work with public and private partners to help maintain and 
improve America's forests and rural communities. It provides financial and technical assistance to state and local goverrunents, tribes, 
private orgaiuzatioiu, and other key partners. The programs average $10 non-federal for every $1 of federal investment. 

CONTACT: USDA Forest Service, Missoula, MT, Chariene Schildwachter, (406) 329-3599 

- Rural Community Assistance (RCA) Program 

DESCRIPTION: Provides assistance to rural communities dependent on natural resources to develop strategies and implentent projects 

which result in community capacity building and long-term social, environmental, and economic sustainability. 
AMOUNT: Planning grants are limited to $5,000, and project implementation grants are limited to $20,000. 
CONTACT: USDA Forest Service, www.fs.fed.us 



U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) 

■ Planning Assistance 

DESCRIPTION: The Corps of Engineers cissists states, local governments, tribes, and other non-federal entities in the preparation of 
compreher\sive plans for the development, utilization, and conservation of water and related land resources. 

CONTACT: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 215 N 17*, Omaha, NE 68102. Debra K. Brey, Business Development Director, (402) 221-7715, 

debra.k.brey®usace.army.mil; Maria Luckey, (402) 221-7269, maria.e.luckeyS^ sace.army.mil: for general questior\s regarding Lewis & Clark in 
eastern Montana, contact Carol Ryan, Omaha District L&C Coordinator, (402) 667-7873 ext 3248; for general information on the National L&C 
efforts, contact Jeannine M. Nauss, National Lewis & Qark Bicenteniual Coordinator, (402) 697-2532 

U.S. Department of Education 

■ Teaching American History Grant Program 

DESCRIPTION: Grants are awarded on a competitive basis to local educational agencies to teach traditional American history in elementary and 

secondary schools; while partnering with a college/university, a nonprofit history or humanities orgaruzatiorv or a library or museum. 
AMOUNT: Varies (Congress appropriated $100 million for Teaching American History grants for Fiscal Year 2002.) 
CONTACT: VS. Department of Education, www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/TAH 



:-2 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



U.S. Department of the Interior 

■ Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Sourcebook 

DESCRIPTION: The Department of the Interior has compiled the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Sourcebook web site to assist states, communities and 
tribes in locating sources of federal, state, philanthropic and foundation support for Bicenteni\ial projects. Topics include commuruty and 
economic development, cultural resource management/historic preservatioiv education, infrastructure/transportatioiv museum and library 
services, natural resource management and conservation, and recreation. Information in the Sourcebook has been divided into four chapters: 
Federal Assistance, National Foundations, Multi-State Foundations, and State Government Programs and State-Spedfied Foundatioiu. 

CONTACT: U.S. Department of the Interior, www.doi.g ov, or www.lewisandclark200.gov 

■ National Park Service (NFS) 

DESCRIPTION: The National Park Service was created in 1916 as a federal bureau in the Department of the Interior. . NPS currently is respoi\sible 
for protecting 378 park system areas. Park system designations include: national park, i\atioruil preserve, national monument, natiorul 
memorial, national historic site, national seashore, and national battlefield park. Montcina contains all, or part, of eight park areas: Big Hole 
National Battlefield, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Fort Union Trading Post Natioi\al Historic Site (with North Dakota), Glacier 
National Park, Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Nez Perce Nation Historical Park 
(with Idaho), and Yellowstone Natiotul Park (with Wyoming). 

CONTACT: National Park Service, www.nps.g ov. or www .nps. led/grants, for various program requirements and amounts. 

- National Heritage Area Act 

DESCRIPTION: NPS assists and encourages local, state, aiui federal goverrunents to develop heritage areas. 

Rivers and Trails Conservation Assistance Program 

DESCRIPTION: NPS offers planning and organizational assistance for local commimity projects promoting nature-based recreation and 

envirorunental, historical, and cultural conservation projects. The Program has had a long involvement in trails projects. 

- Resource Conservation and Development Funds 

DESCRIPTION: These funds are designed to encourage state and local governments and non-profit organizations to improve resource 
conservation by providing 50% matching funds for recreation, including parks and land acquisition. 

- Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Assistance Program 

DESCRIPTION: This program provides funding assistance up to $100,000 for a limited number of projects. 

U.S. Dept. of Transportation (DOT) - Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) 

DESCRIPTION: The mission of the U.S. Department of Transportation, established by Congress in 1966, is to ensure a fast, safe, efficient, accessible 
and conveiuenf transportation system that meets vital national interests and enhances quality of life, today and into the future. Various 
funding programs are available to improve rural and urban roads which are part of the National Highway System. 

CONTACT: U.S. Dept. of Transportatiorv www.dot.gov. Federal Highway Adntiiustration, vyww.fhwa.dot.g ov 

■ Transportation Equity Act for the 21*' Century (TEA-21) 

DESCRIPTION: Passed into law in 1998, TEA-21 authorizes highway, highway safety, transit and other surface transportation programs through 
FY 2003. Significant features of TEA-21 are continuation of the initiatives established in the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act 
of 1991 (ISTEA); assurance of a guaranteed level of Federal funds for surface transportation through FY 2(K)3; extension of the Disadvantaged 
Business Enterprises (DBE) program; strengthening of DOT safety programs; and investments in research to maximize the performance of the 
transportation system. 

CONTACT: Federal Highway Admiiustration, Transportation Equity Act for the 21* Century, www.(hwa.dot.gov/tea21 .htm 



Federal Sources 



} 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(K)3-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-3 



Federal Sources * 



National Scenic Byways Program 

DESCRIPTION: The National Scenic Byways Program recognizes highways that are outstanding examples of beauty, culture, and recreational 

experiences by designating them as All-American Roads, or National Scenic Byways. State and federal land management agencies submit 

nominations to the U.S. Department of Transportation for recognition. 
CONTACT: Federal Highway Administration, National Scenic Byways, Sharon Hurt Davidson, (800) 4 Byways, www.byways.org . For 

information on Montaru's byway program, contact Montana Department of Transportation, 2701 Prospect Avenue, PO Box 201001, Helena, 

MT 59620, (406) 444-3423, (800) 714-72%, www.mdt.state.mt.us 

Signing - Manual on Uniform Highway Control Devices (MUTCD) 

DESCRIPTION: The MUTCD contains standards for uniform traffic control devices that regulate, warn, and guide road users along highways and 
byways in all 50 States. An electronic version of the official FHWA publication is posted on the MUTCD web site //mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov. Part 
2 (signs) of the MUTCD Millennium Editioa and the 2002 edition of the Standard Highway Signs book, contain general and specific sign 
information for regulatory, general, warning and guide sigr\s, specific service (logo) signs, tourist-oriented directional sigt\s (TODS), 
recreational and cultural interest area signs, and emergency management signs. Symbol sign graphics also are included. 

CONTACT: US. Dept. of Transportation - Federal Highway Admirustration, //mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov 



Environmental Protection Agency 

■ SmartGrowth 

DESCRIPTION: In 19%, the VS. Environmental Protection Agency joined with several non-profit and goverrunent organizations to form the Smart 
Growth Network (SGN). The Network was formed in response to increasing community concerns about the impacts of growth on local 
economies, the environment, and community vitality. The Network's partners include envirotunental groups, historic preservation 
organizations, professional organizations, developers, real estate interests, local and state government entities. The SGN works to encourage 
development that serves the economy, community and the environment. It is a forum for raising public awareness of how growth can 
improve commuruty quality of life; developing and sharing information on smart growth best practices, irutovative policies, tools and ideas; 
and cultivating strategies to address barriers to, and advance opportuiuties, for smart growth. 

CONTACT: Smart Growth Network, c/o International City/County Management Association, 777 North Capitol Street, NE Suite 500 
Washington, DC 20002, (202) %2-3582, smartgrowthgicma.org. www.smartgrowth.org 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

■ Economic Development Administration (EDA) Loans and Grants 

DESCRIPTION: EDA provides grants for planning and implementatiorv staffing, business incubators, and other economic development programs, 
and projects. Projects can include infrastructure, rural development through tourism, technical assistance, research, marketing/promotion, etc. 

CONTACT: Economic Development Administration, PO Box 578, Helena, MT 59601, (406) 449-5380, John Rogers, edrmtedaeaol.com. 

www.doc.gov/eda . EDA Denver Region (includes Montana): 1244 Speer Blvd, Suite 670, Denver, CO 80204, 303-844-4715, Anthony Preite, 
Regional Director, apreitegeda.doc.gov 

■ U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) 

DESCRIPTION: The Small Business Administration, established in 1953, provides financial, techrucal and management support to assist 

businesses with start-up, perpetuation, and growth. SBA provides business loans, loan guarantees, disaster loans, venture capital, and is the 
nation's largest, single financial backer of small busii\esses. 

CONTACT: US. Small Business Administration, Federal Building, 10 West 15«> Street, Suite 1100, Helena, MT 5%26, (406) 441-1081, Michelle 
Johnson, District Director, www.sba.gov/mt/ * '_ 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(X)3-2(X)7 



Appendix C: Resources 



■ Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) 

DESCRIPTION: Sponsored by the Small Business Administration, SCORE comprises 13,000+ person volunteer program with over 750 locations 
nationwide. Provides technical assistance to small business owners, managers, and potential owners to solve o[>eratir\g problems through free 
one-on-one counseling and a wide variety of free or low-cost workshops. 

CONTACT: SCORE, (800) 634-0245, (202) 205-6762 

State of Montana 

Montana Department of Commerce (DOC) 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Department of Commerce is responsible for diversification and expansion of the state's economic base through 

business creation, expansion and retention, and improvement of basic community infrastructure. DOC works with economic and community 
development orgaruzations, businesses, communities, governmental entities, elected officials, and the public. DOC services and resources 
include Business Resources, Community Development, Housing, and Promotion Divisions, Board of Housing, Board of Investments, Facility 
Finance Authority, and the Board of Research & Commercialization. 

CONTACT: Montana Deparhnent of Commerce, PO Box 200501, Helena, MT 5%20, 301 S. Park Ave., Helena, MT 59601, (406) 841-2700, 
www.commerce.state.mt.us. Economic Development Programs web site: www.commerce.state.mt.us/EconDev/programs 

■ Finance Information Center 

DESCRIPTION: Hosted by the Montana Department of Commerce, www.mtfinanceonline.com is an online center for Montana business finance 
information. Detailed information about state, federal and local programs can be accessed regarding: business finance, public infrastructure, 
business tax incentives, local development, tribal resources, housing and technical assistance. 

CONTACT: DOC Finance Information Center web site, www.mtfinanceoiUir\e.com 

■ Small Business Development Center (SBDC) 

DESCRIPTION: The SBDC network consists of ten Small Business Development Centers which operate in partnership with local public or private 
economic development groups, and are funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration, the Montana Department of Commerce and local 
contributions. The statewide offices offer coui\seling, training, and technical assistance to Montana entrepreneurs. SBDC offices are located 
in Billings, Bozeman, Butte, Colstrip, Great Falls, Havre, Helena, Kalispell, Missoula, and Wolf Point. 

CONTACT: Deparhnent of Commerce, Small Business Development Center, PO Box 200533, 301 South Park, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 841-2700, 
www.commerce.state.mt.us/EconDev/SBDC 

■ MicroBusiness Finance Program 

DESCRIPTION: The MicroBusiness Finance Program finances business projects that would not odierwise be able to obtain financing from other 
sources. Montar\a's MicroBusiness Development Corporations (MBDCs) provide business loans combined with training and technical 
assistance to help business start-ups or expansion. Statewide offices are located in Billings, Bozeman, Butte, Colstrip, Great Falls, Have, 
Kalispell, Helena, Missoula, Wolf Point, Lewistown and Glendive. The Montai\a Department of Conunerce provides most of the capital for the 
revolving loan funds. 

REQUIREMENTS: Montana based business with ten or fewer employees and less than $550,000 annual revenues. 

AMOUNT: Maximum loan amount is $35,000 

CONTACT: Department of Commerce, Small Business Development Center, PO Box 200533, 301 South Park Blvd, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 841- 
2700. www.conunerce.state.mtus/Eco nDev/BusFin/Micro 

■ Special Events Grant Program (SEGP) 

DESCRIPTION: The Special Events Grant Program strives to create and sustain economic development through support of Montana communities, 
organizations and tribal goverrunents spoi\sorii\g or plaiu\ii\g special event projects. Grant funds are provided by the Lodgii^g Facility Use 



State of Montana 
Sources 






Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-5 



state of Montana 
Sources 



Tax. Eligible project types include attendance events, enrichment activities and promotional events. Events established prior to May 30, 1999 
are not eligible for hinding. 
CONTACT: Department o( Commerce Promotion Divisioa PO Box 200533, 301 South Park, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 841-2870, 
www.travelmontana.state.mt.us/OURPROGRAMS/T ourismDevEdJitm 

Tourism-Related Infrastructure Grant Programs (TIIP) 

DESCRIPTION: The Promotion Division Tourism IiA-astructure Investment Program (TIIP) provides grant funding for non-profit project sponson 
to facilitate the development of new tourism-related products, and the enhancement of existing products to encourage visitors to stay longer 
in the state of Montana. These developments and enhancements should strengthen Montana's attraction as a competitive tourism destirution. 

AMOUNT: $10,000 

CONTACT: Department of Commerce, Promotion Division, 301 South Park Blvd, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 841-2795, Fax (406) 841-2871, Victor 
Bjofnbet g, Touriam Development Coordinator, vbjombergtS>state.mt.us, 
www.tr«vdinont«n«jtrte.mt.us/OURFROGRAMSA^ourismDevEdi\tm 

Community Tourism Assessment Program (CTAP) 

DESCRIPTION: CTAP is an 8-month "self help" process offered to three commui\ities each year by the Promotion Division with facilitation 
assistance provided by MSU Extension and the University of Montana Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research. Local community 
action committees use the process and facilitation services to analyze local resident attitudes about and interest in tourism, their community's 
tourism potential, gaps in visitor services, and the identification of affordable projects or actions that could strengthen the role of tourism in 
the local economy. 

CONTACT: Department of Commerce, Promotion Division, 301 South Park Blvd, Helena, MT 5%20, (406) 841-2795, Fax (406) 841-2871, Victor 
Bjomberg, Tourism Development Coordinator, vbjomberg®state.mt.us. 
www.travelmontana.5tate.mt.us/OURPROG RAMS/TourismDevEd.htm 

Census and Economic Information Center (CEIQ 

DESCRIPTION: CEIC provides a central compreherwive economic and demographic information resource for the Department of Commerce, 
public and private agencies, and individuals. Primary focus is acquisition, storage, retrieval, and cost effective access/distribution of data. 
CEIC provides efficient access to VS. Census Bureau data, offers support for mapping (CIS), and supplies research and technical assistaiKe 
via CEICs comprehensive web site. 

CONTACT: Census and Econonuc Wormation Center, 301 South Park Blvd, Heleiui, MT 59620, web site www.ceic.commerce.state.mtus. Dave 

Martin, (406) 841-2740 

Superhost! 

DESCRIPTION: The DOC Promotion Division (Travel Montana) contracts with Flathead Valley Community College to provide a comprehensive 
customer service training/visitor information program for businesses, communities and individuals. Professional trainers conduct interactive 
workshops throughout Montana. The Superhost! program creates awareness and understanding of Montana's travel industry and enhances 
the level of customer service provided by the industry. 

CONTACT: Superhost!, Flathead Community College, 777 Grandview Drive, Kalispell, MT 59901, 406-756-3862, Jen Mae Rowley, Statewide 
Coordirutor, jrowleyOfvcc.cc.mt.u8. www.travelm ontana.stale.mt.us/OURFROGRAMS/Superhost 

Made In Montana (MIM) and Grown In Montana (GIM) 

DESCRIPTION: The Made In Montana/Grown In Montarui programs assist the marketing efforts of Montar\a residents and businesses which 
produce products within the state. The program allows usage of the MIM or GIM image/logo on goods proven to contain 50% or more of 
materiab and labor origir\ating within the state. Benefits include coordination of program promotion by the Montana Departments of 
Commerce and Agriculture, individual and company listings in the MIM/GIM Products Directory and web site, and participation at the 
aimual MIM/GIM trade show. 

CONTACT: Made In Montana, 301 South Park Blvd, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 841-2700, Rebecca Baumann, www.madeinmontanausa.com 



:-6 



Montana Tourism and Recreation SniATEac Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



Montana Historical Society 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Historical Society, organized by the territorial legislature in 1865, received state approval in 1891 and 1949. MHS is 
a state agency perpetuated for the use, learning, culture, and enjoyment of the citizer\s of the state and for the acquisition, preservation, and 
protection of historical records, art, archival and museum objects, historical places, sites, and monuments, and the custody, maintenance, and 
operation of the historical library, museums, art galleries, and historical places, sites, and monuments. 

CONTACT: MonUna Historical Society, 225 N. Roberts, PO Box 201202, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 444-7715, Arnold Olserv Director, 
vyww.his.mt.g ov. or www.montanahistoricalsociety.org 

■ Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission (MLCBC) 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission was created by the 55th Montana Legislature to aid in prep<iration for the 
Bicentennial of Lewis & Clark in Montana to be celebrated from 2003-2006. The Conunission is respoiuible for providing the overall 
leadership and coordination of Montana's Bicentennial observance. As part of their respective missions, the Montaiui Lewis & Clark 
Bicentennial Commission, the Montana Department of Commerce Promotion Division, and the Bonneville Power Admiiustration partnered 
their financial resources to offer grants to qualified communities, non-profit organizations, and tribes undertaking Lewis & Clark-related 
projects in preparation for the Bicentennial. 

AMOUNT: $25,000 maximum 

CONTACT: Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commissioa PO Box 201203, Helena, MT 5%20-1203, (406) 443-2109, Qint Blackwood, Executive 
Director, cblackwood@state.mt.us. or Rita Cortwright, Adnuiustrative Assistant, rcortwright®state.mt.us, www.montanalewisandclark.org 

Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) 

DESCRIPTION: MDTs mission is to serve the public by providing a transportation system and services that emphasize quality, safety, cost 

effectiveness, econon\ic vitality and sensitivity to the envirorunent. 
CONTACT: Montana Deparhnent of Transportation, 2701 Prospect Avenue, PO Box 201001, Helena, MT 5%20, (406) 444-3383, (800) 714-7296, 

www.mdt.s tate.mt.us 

■ Community Transportation Enhancement Program (CTEP) 

DESCRIPTION: CTEP projects are transportation related activities that are designed to strei\gti\en the cultural, aesthetic, and environmental 
aspects of Montana's intermodal transportation system. The CTEP program utilizes Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds for 
transportation projects selected by local government agencies. MDT has elected to sub-allocate the funds to the local governments for 
selection and prioritization of local CTEP projects based on population tigures provided by the U.S. Bureau of the Cei\sus. 

CONTACT: Montana Department of Transportation CTEP Program, Mike Davis, (406) 444-4383, midavis@state.mt.us. or Thomas Martin, (406) 
444-0809, tmartin@state.mt.us . For policy and procedural requirements information, visit www.mdt.state.mt.us/planning/ctep/default . 

■ Aeronautics Division 

DESCRIPTION: The MDT Aeronautics Division, respoi\sible for implementation of the Montana State Aviation System Plarv is composed of two 
bureaus: Safety and Education, and Airport/ Airways. Safety and Education is responsible for registering Montana's pilots and aircraft, air 
search and rescue training, and aviation education. Airport/Airways assists airports with technical expertise, and maintains radio beacons, 
air-to-ground commui\ication sites, and fifteen state-owned airports. The Aeroiuiutics Division manages airport loans and grant programs, 
and is advised by the Aeronautics Board which represents various facets of the industry. Airport aid information is available online, or by 
contacting the Aeronautics Division. 

CONTACT: Montana Department of Transportation, Aeronautics Division, 2701 Prospect Avenue, PO Box 201001, Helena, MT 5%20, (406) 444- 
2506, Debbie AIke, Administrator, wv>rw.mdt.state.mt.us/aeronautics 

Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation (DNRC) 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Coi^servation, established in 1995, is responsible for sustaiiurxg and 

improving the benefits derived from water, soil, forests, and rangeland. DNRC manages the state's trust land resources, protects Montana's 



State of Montana 
Sources 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(X)3-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-7 



) 



natural resources from wildland fires, promotes conservation of oil and gas. DNRC maiuges and assists with several grant and loan 
State of Montana ■ programs, including renewable resource, reclamation and development, treasure state endowment, and wastewater revolving fund programs. 

Sources P Various grants and loans are available. The Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Sourcebook (www.doi.gov or www.lewisanddark200.orgl contaii\s 

several listir\gs. 
CONTACT: Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservatioa 1625 Beventh Avenue, PO Box 201601, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 444-2070, 
Fax (406) 444-2684, www.dnrc.state.mt.us 

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) 

DESCRIPTION: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks seeks to sustain the diverse fish, wildlife and parks resources and recreational opportunities 
essential to a high quality of life for Montanans and nonresident visitors. Partnerships have been formed with other agencies, local 
govenunents, private sector businesses, non-profit organizatioru, and individuals to accomplish FWP goals. Several grant programs are 
available for funding a diversified rjmge of projects. Contact Fish, Wildlife and Parks for requirements and amounts. 

CONTACT: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 1420 East Sixth Avenue, Helena, MT 5%20, (406) 444-4585, www.fwp.state.mt.us 

■ Funding Sources for Trails 

DESCRIPTION: FWP provides funding for trail projects on routes legally desigiuted or otherwise appropriately approved by the land 

management agency. Private sources of trails funds include non-profit organizations, either directly or indirectly associated with trails, as well 
as corporate and business sponsors. The Trails Grant Program includes the promotion of responsible trail use, ethics and safety. Recreation 
rails fimds can be used for all types of trails includii\g non-motorized, motorized, multiple use, community, rural and backcountry. Private 
trail dubs and public agendes are eligible to receive money from this program. The department also provides advice and assistance with trail 
design and management. Grant Applications can be downloaded from FWP's web page www.fwp.state.mt.us/parks/default.asp. 

■ Recreational Trails Program (RTF) 

DESCRIPTION: RTP funds may be used for trail development, renovatioa mainteiumce, acquisition, safety, and interpretation. The RTP Program 
receives a share of the Federal Highway Trust Fund based on an estimate of motorized, non-highway recreational fuel consumption. At least 
30% of the RTP funds must be allocated to motorized recreation, 30% to non-motorized recreation, and the remaining 40% is discretionary for 
diversified/mixed trails use. The Recreational Trails Program allows a maximum of 7% of a state's appropriation to be used for 
administration. 

■ Off-Highway- Vehicle (OHV) Program 

DESCRIPTION: The OHV program supplies grants to maintain and renovate existing OHV trails and fadlities, and to create safety and 

educational programs. It is funded by OHV decal and registration fees, as well as a portion of the state gasoline dealers' license tax, based on 
the number of registered off-road vehicles. OHV Program grants may be approved for: trail maintenance and renovation, equipment, signs, 
labor and administrative costs, trail mapping, and spedal studies. Information about the OHV Trails program or a grant application packet 
may be obtained by calling (406) 444-7317, or e-mail rpaigefi'state.mt.us. Grant Applications can be downloaded from FWP's web page 
www.fwp.state.mt.u8/parks/default.a8p. 

■ Snowmobile Grant Program 

DESCRIPTION: The snowmobile grant program supplies funds to provide, maintain, and renovate existing snowmobile trails and fadlities on 
federal, state, county, and private land, and to create safety and educational programs. 

■ Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) 

DESCRIPTION: The Land & Water Conservation Fund is a federal grant program encouraging a full partnership between national, state, and local 
governments in planning and ftinding outdoor recreation projects. In Montana, LWCF is administered by State Parks, a division of Montana 
Fish, Wildlife k Parks, with federal oversight and assistance by the National Park Service. Grants are provided for the acquisition and 
development of public outdoor recreation areas and outdoor fadlities. Grants may be used to provide up to 50% of costs and must be 

Montana Tourism and Recreation Strateqc Plan 2(X)3-2(X)7 Appendix C: Resources 



matched with non-federal funds. LWCF is a reimbursement program. Any political subdivision of the state, or sovereign Indian Natioiv may 
sponsor a project. This includes incorporated cities/towns, counties, school districts, state agencies, and tribal govertunents. 
CONTACT: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 1420 East Sixth Avenue, Helena, MT 59620, (406) 444-4585, wv/w.fwp.state.mtus/parks/landw/ . Wall 
Timmerman, (406) 444-3818, wtimmerman@state.mt.us. or Kirsten Sheltoa (406) 444-3753, kshelton@state.mt.us 



State of Montana 
Sources 



) 



Montana Universities and Colleges 

■ Montana Business Connections: The Entrepreneurship Center (UM) 

DESCRIPTION: The Entrepreneurship Center is a central clearinghouse for resources and ir\formation on business assistaiKe and economic and 
commuiuty development available. Included on the Internet site are a resource directory database of business assistance and commuruty 
development resources, a comprehei\sive business calendar, and the Montana Manufacturers Information System (MMIS). 

CONTACT: Bob Campbell, Director, Montana Business Conneclior\s, Uiuversity of Montana, 242 Gallagher Business Bldg, Missoula, MT 59812, 
(406) 243-4009, Fax (406) 243-2086, www.mbc.umt.edu 

■ Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research (ITRR - UM) 

DESCRIPTION: ITRR, located at the University of Montana-Missoula, serves as the research arm for Montana's tourism and recreation industry. 
Fimded by the state Lodging Facility Use Tax, ITRR conducts studies on travel, recreation and tourism that are of specialized interest to 
regions, counties, agencies, businesses and other industry stakeholders. Ongoing research projects monitor resident attitudes, commuruty 
tourism assessments, and nonresident travel and visitor characteristics. Study results are available online. 

CONTACT: ITRR, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive. 11(1234, Missoula, MT 59812, (406) 243-5686, www.forestry.umt.edu. Norma 
Nickerson, Director, itrr@forestry.umt.edu 

■ Bureau of Business & Economic Research (BBER-UM) 

DESCRIPTION: BBER is the research department within the University of Montana - Missoula's School of Business Administration which 

monitors the state's economic and business conditions. BBER conducts research to determine Montanans' attitudes and opiiuons regarding 
economic and social issues, and collects and provides economic and industry data to assist businesses, government agencies and individuals. 

CONTACT: University of Montana, Missoula, wvtrw.bber.umt.edu 

■ Extension Service (MSU-Bozeman) 

DESCRIPTION: Located at Montana State Uruversity-Bozeman, the Extension Service program disseminates research-generated knowledge to 
individuals, families and communities about improving agriculture, forestry and other businesses in order to strengthen Montana's families 
and commimities. Expanded partnerships with MSU-Bozemem colleges, MSU-Northem, MSU-Billings, the MSU College of Technology, 
Rocky Mountain College, seven Montema tribal colleges, the University of Montana and other state, federal and private institutions in 
Montana and the Rocky Mountain Region provide a conduit to increase awareness of Extension Service educational and research resources. 
Programs and services are available to muiudpal and county governments, business and industry, public schools, health care providers, the 
general public, and agricultural/forestry producers. 

CONTACT: Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, (406) 994-4636, //extn.msu.montana.edu 



Nonprofit/Local 

Montana Community Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Community Foundation provides grant funds to Montana community organizations for projects related to the arts, 
economic and community development, educatioiv the environment, natural resources, and human resources. 

CONTACT: Montana Community Foundation, Sidney Armstrong, Executive Director, 101 N. Last Chance Gulch. Suite 211, Helena, MT 59601, 
(406) 443-8313, mtcf@mt.net. www.mtcf.org 




Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2(X)7 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-9 




Montana Rural Development Partners (MRDP) 

DESCRIPTION: Montana Rural Development Partners, Inc. supports locally conceived strategies to sustaitv improve, and develop vital and 
prosperous rural Montana communities by encouragiitg commtmication, coordination, and collaboration among private, public and tribal 
groups. Programs include resource team assessments of rural communities, and operation of several listservs to encourage communication 
across the state. Listservs include: MEDA Members, Certified Communities, Montana Ambassadors, Montar\a Revolving Loan Fund, 
Montana Incubator Network, Southwest Montana Technology Network, and Friends of Montana. Subscriptions to the listservs are available 
via email to MRDP. 

CONTACT: Montana Rural Development Partners, Inc, 118 E. Seventh St.; Suite 2A, Anaconda, MT 59711, (406) 563-5259, Fax: (406) 563-5476, 
gloria«mtrdp.org. www.mtrdp.or g 

Montana Economic Developers Association (MEDA) 

DESCRIPTION: The Montana Economic Developers Association (MEDA) is a non-profit association of economic development professioruds. 

MEDA is a certified commuiuty of "lead" economic developers, business specialists, govenunent employees, and staff members of affiliated 
non-profit orgaiuzations which promote or foster economic development activities in Montana. Current MEDA projects include: coordinating 
PPL-Montana Economic Development Workshops, facilitating working groups for Revolving Loan Fund and Montana Incubator Network 
interests, providing education on public policy, and fostering growth of economic development. MEDA's web site includes numy useful liiJcs 
to other state, federal, and private resources. 

CONTACT: Montana Economic Developers Association, c/o Montana Rural Development Partners, Inc, 118 E. Seventh St; Suite 2A, Anaconda, 
MT 59711, (406) 563-5259, Fax: (406) 563-5476, gloria@mtTdp.org . www.mtrdp.org 

Travel Industry Association of America (TIA) 

DESCRIPTION: TIA is an authoritative source of research, arulysis, and forecasting for the domestic and intematioruil travel industry. TIA 

provides marketing programs, forums, marketing, research, and publicatioi\s to increase understanding of tourism's impact. A subsidiary of 
TIA, the State Travel Information Center Directors' Alliance (STICDA), supplies information for state-operated visitor information centers 
about options for operations, staffing, funding, ii\formation distribution, merchandising, research, major improvements, and visitor services. 

CONTACT: Travel Indushy Association of America, 1100 New York Avenue, NW, Ste. 450, Washington, DC 20005, (202) 408-8422, www.tia.org 

National Main Street Center (NMSC) 

DESCRIPTION: The National Main Street Center helps downtowns and neighborhood commercial districts to build strong economic development 
programs through historic preservation. The Natiotul Trust for Historic Preservation, NMSC's parent orgaruzatior\, encourages preservation 
of sites, buildings and objects significant in American history and culture. NMSC provides on-site technical assistance, sponsors workshops 
and conferences, publishes trairung materials, and offers a certification program in professional downtown management The National Main 
Street Network is an orgaruzational membership program that helps communities learn from each other's revitalization experiences. 

CONTACT: National Main Shwt Center, National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036, (202) 

588-6219, wTYW-maiitftreetPfg 
American Planning Association (APA) 

DESCRIPTION: The American Planning Association is a nonprofit, public interest and research organization representing practicing planners, 
officials, and citizens involved with urban and rural planning issues. APA encourages planning that will meet the needs of people/society 
more effectively, advocating for policy changes to incorporate plaiming principles at all levels of govenunent. The Public Information Office 
of APA educates the media, public, and policy makers on land-use planning issues. Extensive research and publications on plaiming topics 
are available via audio conferences, manuals, training workshops, video/audio tape and site. 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(X)3-2(X)7 



Appendix C: Resources 



CONTACT: American Planning Assodation, 122 S. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60603, (312) 431-9100, wwrw.planning.org : Western 
Central Chapter, Ramona Mattix, President, c/o Yellowstone County Planning Department, 4''> Floor, Parmly Library, 510 North Broadway, 
billings, MT 59101, (406) 657-8289, MattixR®d.billings.mt.us 

Local Economic Development Corporations (EDO 

DESCRIPTION: Local economic and community development corporations are located in most areas of Montatu. These non-profit organizatior^s 
strive to improve the economy of their areas by providing assistance to new and expanding businesses, creating income opportunities for 
residents, and assisting with technical and grant writing. 

CONTACT: Contact information can be found on the Montana Rural Development Partners (MEDA) web site membership list, www.mtrdp.org. 
and Montana Economic Development Directory, www.ecodevdirectory.com/montana.htm 

Montana Community Development Corporation (MCDC) 

DESCRIPTION: Montana Community Development Corporation is a private, non-profit organization. MCDC's goal is to improve the economy of 
western Montaru by providing assistance to new and expanding businesses, sustain communities and create income opportunities for low 
and moderate income residents. Services are offered in the following western Montana counties: Missoula County, Ravalli County, Sanders 
County, Mineral County and South Lake County. MCDC's trained commercial loan officers are available to assist in obtairung the financii\g 
needed. Direct loans can be made from MCDC loan funds, or MCDC can assist with accessing bank loans or government-backed loan funds. 

CONTACT: Tracey Spoonemore, 103 E. Main Street, Missoula MT 59802, (406) 728-9234, www.mtcdc.org . tepoon@mtcdc.org 

Bonner Development Group, Inc. (BDG) 

DESCRIPTION: The Bonner Development Group is a proactive, grassroote organization of west Montana community residents who work 

cooperatively to promote growth that will achieve a balance between the native beauty of the community environment and the commercial, 
residential, and industrial development that brings employment, prosperity, and infrastructure support. 

CONTACT: Bruce Hall, PO Box 731, MiUtown, MT 59851, (406) 258-5268 

Glacier Action and Involvement Now (GAIN) 

DESCRIPTION: Glader Action and Involvement Now (GAIN) serves as Glader County's local economic and community development 

organization and is organized to assist, where possible, in developing a more vibrant economy for the residente and businesses of Glader 
County. GAIN provides technical and grant writing assistance to individuals, uiuts of local government and other organizations. GAIN is 
intimately involved in working in coalition v^ith others in north central Montana on the development of a comprehensive strategy to attract 
Lewis & Qark visitors and developments to their part of Montana. 

CONTACT: GAIN, Inc., Executive Director, PO Box 1329, Cut Bank, MT 59427, (406) 873-2337 

Valier Development Corporation 

DESCRIPTION: Valier Development Corporation is an organization dedicated to the general economic growth of the Valier area, indudii\g a tri- 

county Lewis & Qark Bicentennial effort in north central Montana, representing interests of Valier area. 
CONTACT: Valier Development Corporatioa Reid Shiart, Secretary, (406) 279-3331 



Nonprofit/Local 
Sources 



J 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(K)3-2(X)7 



Appendix C: Resources 



C-11 



Bear Paw Development Corporation 

DESCRIPTION: Bear Paw Development Corporation is a private, tvjn-profit organization created for the purpose of administering programs to 
help improve regional ecorramic conditions in Hill, Blaine, Liberty and Chouteau Counties and the Fort Belknap and Rocky Boy's Indian 
Reservations. Bear Paw Development Corporatiorv a certified Microbusiness Development Corporation (MBDC), provides business loans 
combined with training and techiucal assistance to local residents. 

CONTACT: Bear Paw Development Corporatioa 48 Second Ave., PO Box 170, Havre, MT 59501, (406) 265-9226, Fax (406) 265- 
5602 www.bearpaw.org 

Private 



Private Sources 



Dennis & Phyllis Washington Foundation, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: The D&PWF funds education, youth development, and programs for the economically disadvantaged, primarily in areas of 

company operations in Montana. 
CONTACT: Russell J. Ritter, President, PO Box 7067, Missoula, MT 59807-7067, (406) 523-1300. 



Montana Power Foundation, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: The MPF funds arts/cultural programs, educatioiv community development and conferences/semiiurs, primarily in areas of 

company operations in Montana. 
CONTACT: William D. Cain, Manager, 40 East Broadway, Butte, MT 59701-9394, (406) 497-2602, bcain@mtpower.com. 

www.mtpower.com/community/foundation 

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The BNSF Foundation funds literacy, education, children/youth services and arts/cultural programs, in areas of company 

operations in the midwest, north, northwest, southeast, southwest, and the west. 
CONTACT: Dick Russack, President, 5601 West 26* Stiwt, Qcero, IL 60804, (708) 222-4815. 

Northwest Area Foundation (NWAF) 

DESCRIPTION: The Northwest Area Foundation focuses on long-term poverty reduction in an eight-state region (MN, lA, ND, SD, MT, ID, WA, 
OR). NWFA works with communities to reduce poverty, providing expertise and other resources rather than supporting individual 
institutioru with grant funding, and uses three programs to help communities develop long-term solutions to poverty: 1) The Community 
Ventures program is based on need, opportunity, and potential impact of the program to reduce poverty. There are no applications for the 
Community Ventures program as communities are identified on the basis of NWAF research. 2) The Community Connections program facilitates 
access to products, services, knowledge, financial/odier resources, and information which communities need most to form partnerships and 
reduce poverty. 3) Community Horizons helps new and existing community leaders gain skills and resources to stem decline in the 
community. 

CONTACT: Northwest finea Foundation, 60 Plato Boulevard East, Suite 400, St. Paul, MN 55107, (651) 224-9635, www.nwaf.org 

The Trust for Public Land (TPL) 

DESCRIPTION: The Trust for Public Land works to protect/cot\serve land to improve the quality of life for people and communities, and to protect 
natural and historic resources for future generations. TPL offers assistance to source financing for parks and open space, helps generate 
federal, state, and local conservation funding, and promotes the importance of public lands. 

CONTACT: The Trust for Public Land, 2610 University Avenue, Suite 300, St. Paul, MN 55114, (651) 917-2240, www.tpl.org 



:-!2 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2(K)3-2007 



Appendix C: Resources 



Private Sources 



GrantStation.com 

DESCRIPTION: GrantStation.com offers a subscription-based, comprehensive, searchable orUine database for sourcing public and private funding 
and grants. GrantStation also provides comprehensive instructions for finding and developing funding leads, grant applications and 
educational tools for securing available funding. Emphasis is on customized grant searches which link nonprofit organizations to current 
sources of grant money. 

CONTACT: GrantSution.com, (877) 784-7268, www.grantstation.com 

US West Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The U.S. West Foundation funds arts/cultural programs, education, youth development and programs for the economically 

disadvantaged in states served by US West (now Qwest), including Iowa, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Oregon, South Dakota & 
Washington. 

CONTACT: Jane Prancan, Vice President and Executive Director, 1801 California Street, Suite 1360, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 89^4465, (800) 843- 
3383, www.uswf.org 

Conservation Assistance Tools (CAT ) 

DESCRIPTION: Conservation Assistance Tools (CAT) is a searchable database of grants, cost sharing, and technical assistance available for natural 
resources projects in the western United States. It is designed to help local conununities, nonprofits, and govenunent agencies reach the 
informatioa potential partners, and financial support needed to accomplish grassroots conservation projects in the West. This database has 
over 1,100 different grant and technical assistance sources for 16 western states, including all the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Region 6 States 
- the culmination of three years of effort on the part of the eight federal, state and nonprofit partners. The database resides on the server of d\e 
Sonoran Institute, a nonprofit organization in Tucson, Arizona. 

CONTACT: www.sonoran.org 

W.K. Kellogg Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The W.K. Kellog Foundation funds youth development, minorities, rural development and seed money for worthy projects. 
CONTACT: Karen E. Lake, Director of Communications and Marketing, 1 Michigan Avenue East, Battle Creek, MI 49017-4058, (616) 968-1611, 
www.wkkf.org 

The Kresge Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The Kresge Foundation funds arts/cultural programs, envirorunent, capital campaigns and land acquisition. 
CONTACT: John E. Marshall III, President and CEO, 3215 West Big Beaver Road, PO Box 3151, Troy, MI 48007-3151, (248) 643-9630, 
www.kresge.org 

J. Paul Getty Trust 

DESCRIPTION: The JPG Trust funds cultural/ethnic awareness, history and archaeology, museums, historic preservation and related program 

development. 
CONTACT: The Getty Grant Program, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 800, Los Angeles, CA 90049-1685, (310) 440-7320, www.getty.edu/gTant 

Ben & Jerry's Foundation, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: B&J Foundation funds diild development, education, natural resources conservation, community development and 

race/intergroup relations projects. 
CONTACT: Debby Kessler, Administrative Assistant, 30 Community Drive, South Burlingtoa VT 05403, (802) 846-1500, 

www.benjerrv.com/fQundation 

Montana Tourism AND Recreation Strategic Plan 2(X)3-2(X)7 Appendix C: Resources C-13 



Private Sources 



Gannett Foundation, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: The Gannett Foundation funds literacy, education, natural resource conservation, conununity development and project seed 



money in communities served by Gannett publications. 
CONTACT: Irma Simpson, Manager, 1100 Wilson Blvd., 30* Floor, Arlington, VA 22234, www .gannett.com/map/f oundatiot\. 
isimpson«»gcil.gannettcom 

Heineman Foundation for Research, Education, Charitable and Scientific Purposes, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: The Heineman Foundation funds language and linguistics, education, child development, natural resource conservatioiv 

race/intergroup relations, program development and project seed money. 
CONTACT: Brown Brothers Harnman Trust Co., 63 Wall Street, New York, NY 10005 

Lannan Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The Laniun Foundation funds literature, arts/cultural programs, rural Native American communities and land acquisition. 
CONTACT: Unda Hughes, Administrator, 313 Read Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501, (505) 986-8160 

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation 

DESCRIPTION: The JD&CTM Foundation funds commuiuty development, natural resource conservation, arts/cultural programs and related 

program development. 
CONTACT: Richard Kaplan, Director of Grants Management, Research and Infomnation, 140 South Dearborn Street, Suite 1100, Chicago, IL 60603- 

5285, (312) 726-8000, www.madfdn.org. 4answers@m acfdn.org 

The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, Inc. 

DESCRIPTION: The Rubin Foundation funds cultural/ethnic awareness, natural resource conservation, and programs for nunorities. 
CONTACT: Evelyn Jones Rich, Executive Director, 115 5* Avenue, 7* Floor, New York, NY 10003, (212) 780-2035, www.sdrubin.org 



Montana Tourism and Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 Appendix C: Resources 



This appendix lists the reference materials, web sites and other information sources used by the 
planning team during the development of the Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan document. 
For further details, contact the source agency or organization. 



Travel Industry Association of America (TIA) 

Washington, D.C. 

(202) 408-8422, www.tia.org 

U.S. Tourism 2001-2002 

TTA 2002 CXitlook on Cultural, Arts & Heritage Tourism 

TIA 2002 Outlook on Family Travel 

TIA 2001 Auto Travel 

TIA 2002 Outlook on European Travel to the U.S. 

TIA 2002 Outlook on Asian-Pacific Travel to the U.S. 

TIA 2002 Outlook on Canadian & Mexican Travel to the U.S. 

TIA Forum Notes, October 2001 

1988-2002 TIA Press Releases 

Governor's Office of Economic Opportunity 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Dave Gibson 

(406) 444-5634, www.state.mt.us/gov2/cs8 

• A Framework for Economic Development, Jan 2002 

■ Business Montana Interim Report for MT Legislature, Aug. 2000 

Dept. of Commerce Promotion Div. (Travel Montana) 

Helena, Montarui 

Contact: Betsy Baumgart 

(406) 841-2872, www.lravelmontana.state.mt.us 
www.visitmt.com 

Montana 5- Year Tourism Strategic Plans, 1998-2002, 1993-1997 
1998-2002 Tourism Strategic Plan Action Booklet 
FY03 Travel Montarui Tourism Program & Budget 
Travel Montana 5-Year Marketing Plan, July 1998-June 2003 
Tourism & Film Marketing Plan 1999-00, 1998-99, 1997-982001 
Report on the Montana Tourism Industry, Nov. 2000 
Internet Conversion Research Report, Jan 2002 
Image and Positioning Assessment, December 1999, by Strategic 
Marketing and Research 

PI/TV Travel Conversion Study, Nov. 1997, Oct. 1998 
Montana Vacation Guide 2000-2001, 2001-2002 
Montana Winter Guide 2001-2002 
Montana Travel Planner 2000-2001 
2002-2003 Meeting Planners Guide 
Montana Calendar of Events 



• FY02 Warm Season Consumer Advertising Report, Feb. 2002 

• FY02 Winter Campaign 

• FYOO Warm Season Consumer Advertising Report 

■ Travel Montai\a Grant Program Info/Application 

• CTAP Report, Kalispell Visitor Profiles 2001/2001 (1996 info) 

MTRI - Montana Tourism and Recreation Initiative 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Carol Crockett 

(406) 841-2796, www.travelmontana.org 

■ MTRI History PowerPoint Presentation, 2001 

• Memorcmdum of Understanding (MOU) 

■ MTRI Focus Team meeting notes (Oct. 1998 - Feb. 2000) 

■ MTRI 1999 Report of Activities 

■ Montana U&C Bicentennial Interpretive Sign Plan 

■ L&C Bicentennial Project Templates (Feb. 2000) 

■ Proposed L&C "91 Projects" in Montai\a, & Partnerships 

ITRR - UM Institute for Tourism & Recreation Research 

Missoula, Montana 

Contact: Norma Nickerson or Thale Dillon 

(406) 243-2328, www.forestry.umt.edu/itrr 
Publication list of available ITRR materials 
RR 2002-8 Nonresident FALL Visitor ProfUe, Aug 2002 
RR 2002-5 Nonresident SUMMER Visitor Profile, Apr. 2002 
RR 2002-2 Nonresident SPRING Visitor ProfUe, Feb. 2002 
RR 2001-7 Nonresident WINTER Visitor.Profilc Dec. 2001 
RR 2001-1 Visitors to Lewis & Qark Sites, Jan. 2001 
2002 Outlook, Feb. 2002 
ITRR Travel and Recreation Outlook 2001 
An Economic Review of the Travel Industry in Montaru 2000 Ed. 
"Issues and Aiuwers", Estimation & Awareness Study, Jan. 2000 
RR 75 Regional Nonresident Spending in Montana, Mar. 2000 
Montana Vision, 2000 and 2001 issues 
Montana Vision-Travel Research, Feb. 2000 
RR 77 Lewis & Clark Interest & Awareness Study (PLOG 
Research), May 2000 

RR 2000-2 Regional Aiudysis of Pleasure Travel by Montana 
Residents, Oct. 2000 



A ppendix D; 

Reference 
Materials 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strateqc Plan 2(X)3-2007 



Appendix D: Reference Materials 



D-1 



• RR73 Characteristics and Estimates of Visitors to Montana's 
Historic Virgirua and Nevada Cities, Feb. 2000 

■ RR 69 Montana Resident Pleasure Travel Nov. 1999 

• RR 68 Recreation Participation Patterns by Montana Residents, 
Sept. 1999 

• 1999 Montana Nonresident Travel Fact Sheet 

• 1999 Nonresident Travel Estimates ($) 

• TCR 98-6 Expenditure Profiles & Marketii\g Responsiveness of 
Nonresident Visitor Groups to Montana 9/98 

• TCR 98-1 A National Study of Domestic Travel: Results for 
Montana, Analysis of Secondary Data from 1995 American travel 
Survey, USBTS, May 1998 

• RR 51 Nonresident Summer Travelers to Montana-Profiles and 
Characteristics Sept. 1997 

■ RR 55 Nonresident Summer Travelers to Montana: Tourism 
Region Report Apr. 1998 

• Kalispell/Flathead Valley Economic Impact of Visitors - 19% 
data, Jan. 2002 

• ITRR Bicentennial Visitation Study 

Montana Historical Society 

Helena, Montana 

Contact Arnold Olsen 

(406) 444-4706, www.his.state.mt.us 

• 1999-2000 I^IHS Annual Report 

• MHS Summer 2001 Survey Results 

Montana Arts Council 

Stevensville, Montana 

Contact: Cinda Holt 

(406) 777-0090, www.arts.state.mt.us 

• Highlights of the FY 1997 Economic Activity of Montana's Non- 
profit Arts Industry 

• Building Arts Participation Handbook for Rural America 2002 

Montana Regional Marketing Plans & Tourism Info 

• Whitefish CVB, www.whitefishchamber.org 

• West Yellowstorie CVB, www.westyellowstonecvb.visitmt.com 

• Missoula CVB, www.missoulachamber.com/cvb/ 

• IHathead Valley CVB, www.fcvb.org 

• Helena CVB, www.helenacvb.visitmt.com 

• Great Falls CVB, www.greatfallscvb.visitmt.com 

• Butte CVB, www.butteinfo.org 

• Bozeman CVB, www.bozemancvb.visitmt.com 

• Billings CVB, www.billingscvb.visitmt.com 
" Russell Country, www.ru88ell.visitmf.com 

• Yellowstone Country, www.yellowstone.visitmt.com 



• Custer Country, www.custer.visitmt.com 

• Glacier Country, www.glacier.visitmt.com 

• Missouri River Country, www.missouririver.visitmt.com 

• Gold West Country, www.goldwest.visitmt.com 

Montana Department of Revenue, Lodging Tax Info 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Dept. of Revenue, Kurt Alme 

(406) 444-6900, www.state.mt.us/revenue 

■ Lodging Facility Use Tax Guide, MT Dept. of Revenue, rev. 3- 
2000 

• MCA-Lodging Fadlify Use Tax, Oct. 2001 

• TM Lodging Tax Revenue Reports: 1999-2001 State/Regi<w\/aty; 
Apr. - June 2001; Jan. - Mar. 2001 

• TM Regulations & Procedures: Use of Lodging Facility Tax 
Revenue June 2001 

" Montana Lodging Facilities, Mar.l6, 2000 

• ITRR Occupancy Statistics 1987-1999 

• Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Custer Country Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Glacier Cojintry Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Gold West Coimtry Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Missouri River Country Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Russell Country Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

• Yellowstone Country Gross Lodging Tax Revenue 3/17/00 

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Chas Van Genderen 

(406) 444-3756, www.fwp.state.mt.us 

• Mar. 7, 2002 Economic Effects of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife- 
Watching in MT, ND, & No. ID 

• 2002 Automated Licensing System 

• 2002 FWP Regulation Updates 

• 2002 Regulation Updates 

• 2001 Budget Information 

• Nino You Krano, May 2001 

• Montana Access Guide to Federal and State Lands, Aug. 2001 
" Big Game License Counts by State of Origin 

" Hunting & Fishing License Sales 1990-2000 

• 2001 Migratory Birds Montaiu Hunting Regulations 

• 2001 Webless Migratory Birds Montana Hunting Regulations 

• 2000-2001 Upland Game Birds & Falconry MT Hunting Reg'ns 

• 2000-2001 Deer & Elk Montana Hunting RegulaHons 

■ 2001 Mountain Lion Montatui Hunting Regulations 

• 2000-2001 Black Bear Montana Hunting Regulations 

• 2000-2001 Moose, Sheep, Goat, Antelope MT Hunting Reg'ns 



D-2 



Montana Toijrlsm *■ RpruPA-nnN "iTRATFnir Pi an 200.^-2007 



ApfFMnryD- Rpffrpncf Matfriai <; 



2000-2001 Furbearer Montana Trapping Regulations 
Parks/FAS Visitation Summary 1999-2000 
2000-2001 Montana Fishing Regulations 
2001 Montana Boating Laws 
Fishing Access Sites 

Montana State Trails Plan Executive Summary, April 2001 
Montana State Trails Flaa April 2001 
Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Executive 
Summary, April 2001 

Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, State Trails 
Program, April 2001 
FWP 2000 Annual Report 

Fisheries Beyond 2000: Fisheries Program Strategic Plan 1999- 
2010 

FY 2000 Snowmobile Program Report 
1995-2000 Chart of Montana Non-Resident Visitation 
1995-2000 Montana State Park Visitation Compared to Glacier & 
Yellowstone NP 

1991-2000 Lands Use Licei\se Sales Comparison 
Visitation Reports: MT State Parks & Fishing Access Sites, 1995, 
1996-1997, Calendar 1998/Fiscal 1999 

Final Programmatic Enviroiunental Impact Statement Record of 
Decision and Executive Summary, April 1999 
2020 Vision Executive Summary 1998 
2020 Visioa December 1998 
Vision for tt\e Future 

Responsive Management: Montana Residents' Opinions and 
Attitudes toward MFWP, Vol 1, Oct. 1997 
19% Montar\a National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and 
Wildlife- Associated Recreation 

19% National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife- 
Assodated Recreation 
Montana State Parks Brochure and Guides 
Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation In Southwest Montaiui 
The Montana Trail User Study, 1998 

A Contingent Valuation Assessment of Montana Deer Hunting: 
Attihides & Economic Benefit Oct. 1990 
■ The Net Economic Value of Fishing in Montana, Aug. 1987 



Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Jan Vogel or Pat Saindon 

(406) 444-3143, www.mdt.state.mt.us 

• 2001 Public Involvement Telephone Survey 

• TranPlan 21 2002 Draft Annual Report 

• TranPlan 21 2001, 2000, 1999 Annual Reports 

• 2002 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) 



2000-2002 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program Draft 

Helena Reg'l Airport Commercial Activity Statistics, Feb. 2000 

State of Montana Air Carrier/Conunuter Flights and Passengers 

Air Transportation in Montana 

Roosville Border Crossings Survey Results 

2000 Rural Traffic Flow Map 

Lewis & Clark Bicenteniual Highway Flaiming Map, Jan. 2001 

Highway Plarming Map of Lewis & Clark Marker Locations, 

Updated Feb. 1999 

Montana's Highway Rest Areas Map, Existing Sites, Nov. 2001 

Montaiu Rest Area Planning Map, November 2001 

Accident/Safety Information - areas of concern 

Congestion Management Systems (CMS) Definition (Congestion 

indices for Montana roads) 

Montana Rest Area Planning Map - Updated December 1999 

Secondary & State Hwy Level of Service-1998 Existii\g Network 

and 1998 Traffic, & 2003 Traffic Update 

Interstate, Non-Interstate & Primary Level of Service-1998 

Existing Network & 1998 Traffic, & 2003 Traffic Update 

National, Primary & Secondary Highways and Tribal 

Reservations - revised Dec. 21, 1998 

Automatic Counters 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 19%, 1997, 1998, 1999 

Traffic by Sections, Montana 1995, 1997 

Amb-ak Ridership Station Totals 1996-2000 

Amtrak schedules & stops (needed) 

Amtrak passenger info (»'s, sources, MT arrivals/boardings, etc.) 



Montana Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Commission 

Helena, Montana 

Contact: Clint Blackwood 

(406) 443-2109, www.montanaIewisandclark.org 

Legacy: Montana Lewis b Clark Bicentennial Master Plan 

Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Projects Jan. 2000 ("91 Projects") 

Montana Lewis & Clark Trail: 1805 Trail West & 1806 Trail East 

with 2005/2006 numbered sites 

Commission Overview and Resource Library 

State Agency Representatives (Commission Overview) 

Committees & Meeting Notes 

"Journal Notes" MTLCBC newsletter 

Regional & National Conferences, Workshops and Meetings 

Lewis & Clark - The Montana Journey 

Lewis & Clark Community Planning Workshop Resource 

Directory 1999 

Lewis & Clark Trail, History & Opporturuties 

List of Lewis & Qark Events in Montana 

Year 2000 Lewis and Qark Bicentermial Trainir\g Academy 

Funding Resources & Programs for L&C 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Strategic Plan 2003-2007 



Appendix D: Reference Materials 



I>3 



Montana Tribal Tourism Alliance 

Helena, Montana 
Contact: RJ Young 
(406) 768-5155 

■ Proposed Tribal L&C Projects in Montana ("91 Projects") 

■ Tribal L&C Bicentennial Plains 

■ Montaiui Indian Reservations Map 

■ Assorted Montana Tribal Travel/Tour Guides 

• Tribal Colleges Information 

Bureau of Land Management 

Lewistown, Montana 
ConUct: Clark Whitehead 
(406) 538-7461, www.mt.blm.gov 

• FY2001 Visitor Days by Activity 

• Visitation: 1995 & 2001 

■ Lemhi Resource Maiuigement Plan info 

U.S. Anny Corps of Engineers 

Fort Peck, Montana 

Contact Darrin McMurry 

(406) 526-3411, www.usace.army.mil 

■ Fort Peck Lake visitation 1990-2001 

■ Misc information on Fort Peck Interpretive Center 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 

Helena, Montana 
Contact: Shannon Heath 
(406) 449-5225, www.fws.gov 

■ USFW 1991-19% Survey Comparison: Hunting, Angling, 
WUdlife Watching 

• National 1990-2000 Hunting, Angling License Sales 

• 2001-2006 Projects from Refuge Maintenance Mgmt System 

■ Banking on Nature: The Economic Benefits to Local Communities 
of NWR Visitation, July 1997 

• USFW Region 6 Refuge System Centennial Outreach 
Implementation Plan, July 2001 

• MonUna Naf 1 Wildlife Refuge Project "Wish List" from USFW 
Refuge Operating Needs System database 

• USFW MT Naf I Wildlife Rehige System Visitation, FY 1997-2001 

• USFW LAC Bicentennial Outreach Plan Draft 



National Park Service 

Deer Lodge, Montana 
Contact: Scott Eckberg 
(406) 846-2070, www.nps.gov 

• The National Parks: Index 1999-2001 

• Visitor Satisfaction: Grant Kohrs Ranch, May 1999 

■ Big Hole/Bear Paw Battlefields, Grant-Kohrs Visitation Reports 

• 1999 Grant Kohrs Ranch Visitor Study by J. Matthew Coimer 

• Glacier Nafl Park Vehicle Movement & Traffic Study, Dec. 1997 

• Total Understanding of the Sodal-Economic Context of GNP, 
Apr. 19% 

■ GNP Visitors Services Project Mar. 1991, Univ. of Idaho study 

• Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail Administrative Update: 
Apr. 1997, Oct. 1997, Apr. 1998, Oct. 1999 

U.S. Forest Service 

Missoula, Montaru 
Contact: Keith Thurkill 
(406) 329-3602, www.fs.fed.us 

■ Issues and Concerns Related to USDA Forest Service's 
Recreational Fee Demonstration Program, 2002 

• Visitation: USPS L&C Interpretive Center, Great Falls, MT 

• Lolo Trail Plan 

• Lemhi Pass Facilities and Site Direction Initial Proposal 

■ "Getting Things Done!" State and Private Forestry Programs 

Miscellaneous 

• Surrounding States Travel Guides 

• Assorted Montana Tour Guides and Brochures 

• Assorted Lewis & Clark Bicentennial Literature 

• Article: "Gateway Communities" by Edward T. McMahon, 
Planning Commission journal. Spring 1999 

• Article: "Trends in Public Perception of Hunting: An 
Examiiution of Support for Hunting as a Tourism Attraction", 
Kelly J. MacKay, University of Manitoba, Canada 

• "America in Transition", Peter C. Yesawich, presentation at 2002 
Montana GOV's Conference 

• Montana Conservation Corps Annual Report 1997 

• Montaiu Cmte for the Humanities Speakers Bureau 1999-2000 



D-4 



Montana Tourism & Recreation Stkateqc Plan 2003-2(X)7 



Appendix D: Reference Materials 



/